Skip Navigation Bar
 

Education: Higher Education

The Healing Elements: A Native Hawaiian Perspective


Class 2. Natural Elements: Healing Places

Introduction

This is the first class of the four case studies that explore the natural, physical and spiritual elements of Hawaiian health and well-being. Students shall discuss and analyze types of natural resources and places of healing which play a role in the health of Native Hawaiians. They will also be asked to identify resources and places of healing in their own community. The objective is for students to gain an insight into the importance of natural resources and places of healing in the health and well-being of Native Hawaiian and other communities. Students will also discuss the challenges of protecting resources and places of healing.


Resources

  • Aluli, Noa Emmett, and Davianna McGregor. “‘Āina: Ke Ola O Na Kanaka ‘Ōiwi, Land: The Health of Native Hawaiians.” 2007.
  • “Place Names of Hawaii” option under Customized Search box on http://www.wehewehe.org/ (accessed on 5/24/2011). [Note: For English text, click on “ENGLISH TEXT” on upper right corner then use the drop-down menu under “Customized Search” section and select “Place names of Hawaii.” Afterwards type in the name of a place in the “ENTER WORD” search box on the left.]

Pre-class Assignment

Prior to class, students shall read the article by Aluli and McGregor and investigate natural resources and places of healing in their own community. Students should prepare to respond to the Discussion Questions below.

Students also complete the following assignment prior to Class 2:
Select one of the following sites and look up images and information about this site using the “Place Names of Hawaii” search option at http://www.wehewehe.org/. For English text, click on “ENGLISH TEXT” on upper right corner then use the drop-down menu under “Customized Search” section and select “Place names of Hawaii.” Afterwards type in the name of a place in the “ENTER WORD” search box on the left. Prepare to share the information you found at the end of the class.

  • Healing Stones of Wahiawā, Waikīkī, and Hauola
  • Birthing Stones of Kūkaniloko, Holoholokū Heiau and birthing stone
  • Kauleonānāhoa Phallic Rock
  • Pu‘u Loa Piko Stone
  • Keaīwa Healing Heiau
  • Black Rock Kā‘anapali, Ka‘ena Point O‘ahu, Polihale Kaua‘i - Leina or where spirits pass into the next world

class activity

Teachers look up the following healing places discussed in the article by Aluli and McGregor and show online images of these sites to the class, then lead students to discuss the questions below.

  • Healing Stones of Wahiawā, Waikīkī, and Hauola
  • Birthing Stones of Kūkaniloko, Holoholokū Heiau and birthing stone
  • Kauleonānāhoa Phallic Rock
  • Pu‘u Loa Piko Stone
  • Keaīwa Healing Heiau
  • Black Rock Kā‘anapali, Ka‘ena Point O‘ahu, Polihale Kaua‘i - Leina or where spirits pass into the next world

Discussion Questions

  1. What are the various categories of Hawaiian healing resources and places described in the article by Aluli and McGregor?
  2. According to Aluli and McGregor, how do healing resources and places contribute to the well-being of the Native Hawaiian community?
  3. What are resources and places of healing in your community?
  4. What are the challenges in protecting resources and places of healing in Hawai‘i and in your community?

Back to top