Skip Navigation Bar
 
Emotions and Disease banner written in dark purple with a light blue background. On the left side of the words is a bedside scene in a traditional medical setting. On the right side is an image of a nerve cell.

Checklist

In the list that follows, call numbers in parenthesis have been provided only for items from the collections of the National Library of Medicine. All measurements, when available, are given in centimeters unless otherwise noted.

The Balance of Passions

Walter Ryff (d. 1548), Spiegel und Regiment der Gesundheyt, Frankfort, 1555. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of woodcut illustration.


A Long Tradition

Johannes de Ketham (fl. 1455-1470), Fasciculus Medicinae, Venice 1495. Book: 31 (h) x 43 (open width) (WZ 230 K43f 1495).

Description of the Humoral system. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration with English translation of the original Latin text. Based on an original illustration in Fasciculus Medicinae.

Hippocrates (ca. 460 B.C.Bca. 370 B.C.), Hippokratous . . . Iatrike, Basel, 1543. Book: 15 (h) x 21 (open width) (WZ 240 H667 1543).

Galen (131-201), Opera ex sexte Juntarum editione, 1586. Book: 36.5 (h) x 48.5 (open width) (WZ 240 G153L 1586 v. 1).

Illustrated title page in red and black ink. The title and publication information is in the center surrounded by vignettes of medical diagnosis.

Galen
Opera ex sexte Juntarum editione
Venice 1586.

Galen (131-201), Opera ex sexte Juntarum editione, 1586. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration of a lovesick maiden taken from title page illustration.

Johanna Engel (1463-1512), Astrolabium Planum in Tabulis Ascendens, 1488, copy 1. Book: 25.5 (h) x 37.5 (open width) (WZ 230 A585a 1488).

Johanna Engel's Astrolabium Planum in Tabulis opened to show two pages. Each page has four colored scences in square boxes surrounding the scences depicting the influence of the zodiac signs on everyday life.

Johanna Engel (1463-1512)
Astrolabium Planum in Tabulis
Ascendens, Augsburg, 1488

Gregor Reisch (d. 1525), Margarita Philosophica cum Additionibus Novis, Basel, 1517. Book: 21.5 (h) x 36 (open width). (WZ 240 R375m 1517).

Gregor Reisch (d. 1525), Margarita Philosophica cum Additionibus Novis, Basel, 1517. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration of profile of head.

Moses Maimonides (1135-1204), Tractatus Rabbi Moysi de Regimine Sanitatis ad Soldanum Regem, Augsburg, 1518. Book: 20 (h) x 28 (open width) (WZ 240 M911tL 1518).

Justus Cortnumm (ca. 1624-1675 m.), De Morbo Attonito Liber Unus, Leipzig, 1677. Book: 21 (h) x 33 (open width) (WZ 250 C8298dm 1677).

Ambroise Paré (1510?-1590), The Workes, London, 1649. Book: 33 (h) x 45.5 (open width) (WZ 250 P227E 1649).

Honoré Daumier (1808-1879), Bobonne, Bobonne, tu me ferais un monstre comme ça, ne le regarde pas tant!, 1860s. Lithograph: 33 (h) x 25 (w).

Robert Burton (1577-1640), The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed for Henry Cripps, 1632. Book: 29 (h) x 37.5 (open width) (WZ 250 B9745a 1632).

Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy opened to page 1.

Robert Burton (1577-1640)
The Anatomy of Melancholy
Oxford, 1632

William Falconer (1744-1824), A Dissertation on the Influence of the Passions Upon the Disorders of the Body, London, 1788. Book: 20.5 (h) x 27 (open width) (WZ 260 F179d 1788).

Bloodletting lancet, 19th century. Lancet: 1/2" (h) x 1" (w) 2" (l). Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

Scarifactor, 19th century. Scarifactor: 2" (h) x 1" (w) x 2" (l).Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

Artificial leech, 1879. Leech: 5" (h) x 1" (dia).Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

Photograph of a Bloodletting lancet, Scarifactor and Artificial leech.

These mechanical bloodletting devices were used by physicians in the nineteenth century, an indication of the long persistence of humoral theory in the seventeenth century.

Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.


Johannes de Ketham (fl. 1455-1470), Fasciculus Medicinae, Venice 1495. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration of bloodletting sites.

Page 16 of Johannes de Ketham's Fasiculo de medicina, featuring an illustration of a bloodletting man, detailing a map of the veins to be incised for bloodletting.

Johannes de Ketham (fl. 1455-1470)
Fasciculus Medicinae
Venice, 1495.


The Challenge of Anatomy

Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), De Humani Corporis Fabrica, Venice, 1568. Book: 32.5 (h) x 45 (open width) (WZ 240 V575dh 1568).

Andreas Vesalius' (1514-1564), De Humani Corporis Fabrica, Venice, 1568. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration of autopsy/dissection tools.

Thomas Willis (1621-1675), The Remaining Medical Works of Thomas Willis, London, 1679. Book: 34 (h) x 46.5 (open width) (WZ 250 fW35phE 1679a).

Rudolf Virchow (1821-1902), Die Cellularpathologie in ihrer Begründung auf Physiologische und Pathologische Gewebelehre, Berlin, 1858. Book: 22 (h) x 29.5 (open width) (QSA V813c 1858).

Rudolf L.K. Virchow. Photograph: 16.5 (h) x 11 (w).

René Théophile Hyacinthe Laënnec (1781-1826), De l'Auscultation Médiate, ou, Traité du Diagnostic des Maladies des Poumons et du Coeur (On Mediate Ascultation, or, Treatise on the Diagnosis of the Diseases of the Lungs and Heart), Paris, 1819. Book: 21 (h) x 26 (open width with illustration) (WF L158de 1819).

Postcard of Laënnec, A l'Hopital Necker, Ausculte Un Phtisique, original painting by Théobald Chartran (1849-1907). Postcard: 15.7 (h) x 12 (w).

Laënnec-style Stethoscope. Stethoscope: 10" (l) x 1.5" (dia).
Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

Microscope, 1864. 11" (h) x 16" (l) x 9.5" (d). Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

An 1864 metal microscope used by Joseph Woodward.

Joseph Woodward used this microscope in his pioneering work as a microscopist. The mirror reflected the light from a window through the microscope and onto a photoplate, thereby allowing Woodward--or other scientists --to photographically capture certain features of cells.
Courtesy Historical Collections, National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.


Alexandar Levy, Woodward Working in the Laboratory, ca. 1952. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration.

Autopsy/dissection kit, ca. 1845. 1" (h) x 3" (w) x 7" (l) closed. Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

An opened autopsy kit from ca. 1845 with the half of the instruments still in the kit and the others fanned out.

This autopsy kit from ca. 1845 shows instruments more refined than those of the sixteen century, although their basic design is not much altered.
Courtesy Historical Collections, National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.


Edouard Hamman (1819-1888), Andreas Vesalius, ca. 1848. Lithograph: 31.2 (h) 40.2 (w).


The Compromise

William Cullen (1710-1790), First Lines of the Practice of Physics,Edinburgh, 1784 (WZ 260 C967f 1784).

Robert Whytt (1714-1766), Observations on the Nature, Causes, and Cure of Those Disorders Which Have Been Commonly Called Nervous, Hypochondriac, or Hysteric, Edinburgh, 1765. Book: 20.5 (h) x 28 (open width) (WZ 260 W619on 1765).

Robert Whytt's Observations on the Nature, Causes, and Cure of Those Disorders Which Have Been Commonly Called Nervous, Hypochondriac, or Hysteric opened to display the text on pages 212 and 213.

Robert Whytt (1714-1766)
Observations on the Nature, Causes, and Cure of Those Disorders Which Have Been Commonly Called Nervous, Hypochondriac, or Hysteric
Edinburgh, 1765.


Austin Flint (1812-1886), A Treatise on the Principles and Practice of Medicine, Philadelphia, 1868. (WB F623t 1868).

Back to top with arrow pointing towards the top of the page


Psychosomatic Medicine: The "Puzzling Leap"

André Brouillet, Une Leçon Clinique à la Salpêtrière, 1887. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of painting. (B04519)

Camera, ca. 1900. Camera: 16" (h) x 16" (w) x 42" (l).
Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

Désiré-Magloire Bourneville and Paul Regnard, Iconographie Photographique de la Salpêtière, Paris, 1877-1880. Graphics: Two Photographic reproductions of two patients with hysteria.

Honoré Daumier (1808-1879), Le malade imaginaire, 1860s. Lithograph.
Courtesy Penny Herscovitch.

Joseph Breuer(1842-1925) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), Studies on Hysteria, New York 1957. (WM 173 B846s 1957)

Berggasse 19, Sigmund Freud's Home and Office, Vienna 1938, The Photographs of Edmund Engelman, Chicago, 1976. (CC2656)

Sidney Chafetz, Portrait of Sigmund Freud, 1964. Etching: 69 (h) x 56 (w).

H. Flanders Dunbar (1902-1959), Emotions and Bodily Changes: A Survey of Literature on Psychomatic Interrelationships, 1910-1933, New York, 1935. Book: 24.5 (h) x 35.5 (open width). (WM 90 D898e 1935)

Psychosomatic Medicine, September-October 1959. (W1 PS82)

Smith Ely Jelliffe (1866-1959), "Psychopathology and Organic Disease," Sketches in Psychosomatic Medicine, New York 1939. (W1 NE211 no.65 1939)

Georg Groddeck (1866-1934), The Book of the It, New York, 1928. Book: 23 (h) x 32.5 (open width). (W1 NE211 v. 49)

Franz Alexander (1891-1964), Psychosomatic Medicine, New York, 1950. Book: 22 (h) x 31.5 (open width) (WM 90 A375p 1950).

Franz Alexander (1891-1964), Psychosomatic Medicine, New York, 1950. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of schematic representation of specificity in the etiology of the peptic ulcer.

Helen Lundeberg (1908- 1999), Double Portrait of the Artist in Time, 1935. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of oil painting.

An oil painting of the artist as a child in the foreground and as an adult in a portrait on the wall. The child sits at a table with a clock and blank paper. She holds a flower bud and the adult figure holds a blooming flower. A shadow connects the young girl to the grown woman.

Double Portrait of the Artist in Time
Helen Lundeberg

Psychosomatic medicine traced the diseases suffered as an adult back to the developmental dramas and traumas of early childhood.
Courtesy National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.


Roy Grinker (1900-) and John P. Spiegel (1911-), War Neuroses in North Africa: The Tunisian Campaign (January-May, 1943). Prepared and distributed for the Air Surgeon, Army Air Forces by the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation, New York, September 1943. Book: 23 (h) x 15 (w). (WM 184 G867w 1943)

Roy Grinker (1900-) and John P. Spiegel (1911-), Men Under Stress, Philadelphia, 1945. Book: 33 (h) x 23 (w). (WM 184 G867m 1945)

Thomas W. Salmon (1876-1927), The Care and Treatment of Mental Diseases and War Neuroses ("Shell Shock") in the British Army, War Work Committee of the National Committee for Mental Hygiene, New York, 1917. Book: 24.5 (h) x 46.5 (open width with illustration). (UH 629 S172c 1917)

Frank Loesser (1910-1959), "Adelaide's Lament," Guys and Dolls, 1950. © 1950, 1978 Frank Music Corporation. Sheet music and lyrics. Donated by Lou Storey.

Back to top with arrow pointing towards the top of the page


Self-Healing, Patents, and Placebos

Pharmaceutical Era, February 1889. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration of pharmacy designed and built by C.H. Bangs.

Pharmacy Bottle. Bottle: 26" (h) x 6" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

A blue and red pharmacy bottle. The bottom of the bottle is filled with blue liquid, which the red bottle caps the bottom bottle.

Pharmacy Bottle.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.


Benjamin Rush (1746-1813), An Inquiry into the Effects of Ardent Spirits Upon the Human Body and Mind, with an Account of the Means of Preventing, and of the Remedies for Curing Them, New York, 1811. Book: 17 (h) x 21.5 (open width). (WZ 270 R952i 1811)

Albert Vernon, Correspondence Course of Instruction in the Science of Psychratism or Prowess of the Human Mind, Rochester, New York, The Vernon Academy of Mental Sciences and The Vernon Sanatorium, 1900. Book: 17.5 (h) x 53.5 (open width). (BF V539c 1900)

Albert Vernon's Course of Instruction in the Science of Psychratism or Prowess of the Human Mind opened to page 114 and 115. Page 114 begins a lesson XXXV Use in Denistry, while page 115 has an image of a man seated in a chair with his head tilted back while another man attempts to extract a tooth. The caption below the image says extracting a tooth without pain.

Albert Vernon
Correspondence Course of Instruction in the Science of Psychratism or Prowess of the Human Mind
Rochester, New York.


Julia Anderson Root, Healing Power of Mind: A Treatise on Mind-Cure, with Original Views on the Subject and Complete Instructions for Practice and Self-Treatment, Peoria, Illinois, 1886. Book: 20.5 (h) x 32.5 (w). (WM R806h 1886)

William James: Investigator of the Subliminal Consciousness. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of a photograph. (B15230)

Mirror with gilt frame (with Emile Coué quote), ca. 1920.
Courtesy Elizabeth Fee

Charles Fremont Winbigler (1857-1925), How to Help and Heal One's Self or a New Outlook on Life, Los Angeles, 1916. Book: 20 (h) x 14 (w). (QT 180 W758h 1916)

John Kearsley Mitchell (1859-1917), Self Help for Nervous Women: Familiar Talks on Economy in Nervous Expenditure, Philadelphia, 1909. Book: 20 (h) x 14 (w). (WM M675s 1909)

The covers of Charles Fremont Winbigler's How to Help and Heal One's Self or a New Outlook on Life and John Kearsley Mitchell's Self Help for Nervous Women: Familiar Talks on Economy in Nervous Expenditure.

Charles Fremont Winbigler (1857-1925)
How to Heal and Help One's Self or a New Outlook on Life, Los Angeles, 1916

John Kearsley Mitchell (1859-1917)
Self Help for Nervous Women: Familiar talks on Economy in Nervous Expenditure Philadelphia, 1909.


"Laughter is the Best Medicine," Reader's Digest, April 1958. Magazine: 7" (h) x 10" (w).
Courtesy Ghilta Sternberg.

Dale Carnegie (1888-1955), How to Stopy Worrying and Start Living, New York, © 1944. Book: 6" (h) x 4" (w).

Thomas A. Harris (1913- ), I'm Okay--You're OK, New York, 1973, ©1967. Book: 7" (h) x 4" (w).

Norman Vincent Peale (1888-1994), The Power of Positive Thinking, New York, 1992, ©1952. Book: 7"(h) x 4" (w).

Perkins Metallic Tractors, late 18th century. Tractors: 3" (l) x 1/2" (w).
Courtesy Historical Collections, The National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

John Haygarth, Of the Imagination as a Cause and as a Cure of Disorders of the Body; Exemplified by Fictitious Tractors, and Epidemical Convulsions, 1800. Book: 21.5 (h) x 27.5 (w). (WZ 260 H421o 1800)

Benjamin Douglas Perkins (1774-1810), The Family Remedy; or, Perkins's Patent Metallic Tractors, For the Relief of Topical Disease of the Human Body: And of Horses, 1800. Pamphlet: 22.5 (h) x 14.5 (w). (WZ 260 P447f 1800)

Unicorn's horn. Horn: 73" (h) x 4" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Kickapoo Oil: Relief from Aches and Pains.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Nerve & Bone Liniment.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Hood's Sarsaparilla, Gentian and Bitter Orange Compound.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Bliss Native Balsam.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Swamp Root.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Milks Emulsion Natures Remedy.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Erso Anti-Bilious Bitters.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Pastor Koenig's Nervine for Nervous Aliments.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Goldine Tonic and Nervine.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Ads Compound Syrup Hypophosphites Clear.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Powdered unicorn horn.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Four Batteries. Batteries: 1" (dia) to 1" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Humphreys' Remedies sign. Sign: 16" (h) x 12" (w).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Warner's Safe Cure Almanac and Book of Handy Information. Buffalo, New York. Book: 22 (h) x 15.5 (w). (W6 P3 no. 7475) 1895

Portrait of Sir William Osler. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of painting. (B020142)

Milk Sugar. Bottle: 5" (h) x 2" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Antilirium Placebo. Bottle: 4" (h) x 2" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Cebocap No. 1. Bottle 2" (h) x 1" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Cebocap No. 2. Bottle 2" (h) x 1" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Cebocap No. 3. Bottle 2" (h) x 1" (dia).
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Nardil Placebo.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Placebo for Elavil HC1.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Placebo for Stelazine.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Placebo for Valium.
Courtesy Elaine and Arthur Shapiro.

Jon D. Levine, Newton C. Gordon, Howard L. Fields, "The Mechanism of Placebo Analgesia," The Lancet, September 23, 1978. Book: 28 (h) x 38 (open width). (W1 LA453)

"Pain Pathways." Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration.
Courtesy Alfred Mansour, Mental Health Research Institute, University of Michigan.

Back to top with arrow pointing towards the top of the page


Stress and Deprivation

Peter Gridley, Long Island Expressway, Graphic: Photographic reproduction of photograph.
Courtesy Peter Gridley/FPG.

Chris Todd, "Noise Pollution." Audio recording.

Walter Bradford Cannon Graphic: Photographic reproduction of photograph. (B30295)

Walter Bradford Cannon (1871-1945), Bodily Changes in Pain, Hunger, Fear and Rage: An Account of Recent Researches into the Functions of Emotional Excitement, New York, 1915. (BF 511 C226b 1915)

Walter Bradford Cannon (1871-1945), The Wisdom of the Body, New York, 1939. (QT 104 C226w 1939)

Hans Selye (1907-1982), The Physiology and Pathology of Exposure to Stress, Montreal, 1950. Book: 24.8 (h) x 39.5 (open width). (QZ 140 S469p 1950).

American Journal of Nursing, March 1965. (W1 AM495)

Reader's Digest, February 1957. Magazine: 19 (h) x 27 (open width).
Courtesy Ghilta Sternberg.

Howard Taft Lorenz, Dismissal (or) Pink Slip, 1940. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of oil painting.
Courtesy National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, transfer from Museum of Modern Art.

Excerpts from Monica Study, 1950s. Video.
Courtesy Dr. George Engel.

Monica, 1950s. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of six original photographs of Monica.
Courtesy Dr. George Engel.

2/26/54 Applegate, Histamine laboratory "flowsheets." Graphic: Photographic reproduction of original laboratory notes.
Courtesy Dr. George Engel.

B. Kent Houston and C.R. Snyder, editors, Type A Behavior Pattern: Research, Theory, and Intervention, New York, 1988. Book: 24 (h) x 36 (w). (WG 300 T991 1988)

Robert Dantzer, The Psychosomatic Delusion, New York, 1993. (1993 A-261)

Defuse Stress, Health Dynamics Poster Program. © 1988 Clement Communications, Inc. Poster: 56 (h) x 43.2 (w). (A25395)

Kai T. Erickson, Everything in Its Path, New York, 1976.
Donated by Lou Storey

Barry J. Marshall, Richard W. McCallum, Richard L. Guerrant, editors, Helicobacter Pylori in Peptic Ulceration and Gastritis, Boston, 1991. (WI 310 H475 1991)

Scott Adams, Dilbert, September 15, 1996. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of cartoon. © 1996 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

Volvo Assembly Line, Sweden, ca. 1987. Graphic: Two photographic reproductions of the assembly line.
Courtesy Volvo Truck Corporation, Powertrain Division, Skövde, Sweden.

Saratoga Spa, N.Y., ca. 1950s. Postcard: 3" (h) x 5".
Courtesy Ghilta Sternberg.

Betty White with Thomas J. Watson, Betty White's Pet-Love: How Pets Take Care of Us, New York, 1983. Book: 21.5 (h) x 30 (open width). (DD8254)

Betty White's Pet-Love: How Pets Take Care of Us open to show four images of patients in hospitals, hospices, and nursing homes being visited by animals.

Some hospitals, hospices and nursing homes have discovered that patients feel calmer and less depressed in the presence of a loving, furry friend--some may even become more stable physiologically or recover more quickly from their illness as a result of their involvement in "pet therapy."
Photograph credits (l to r): Courtesy of People-Pet Partnership Program; Flossie Stowell; Courtesy of People-Pet Partnership Program; Courtesy of People-Pet Partnership Program. Used by permission of William Morrow & Co., Inc.


Cindy Ruskin, photographs of Matt Herron, The Quilt: Stories from the NAMES Project, New York, 1988.
Courtesy Nola Heffner.

Back to top with arrow pointing towards the top of the page


Frontiers of the Mind

How Emotions Matter

Position Emission Tomography (PET Scanner), Graphic: Photographic reproduction.
Courtesy GE Medical Systems.

Emotions and Disease: The Delicate Balance, 1996. Video. Produced by the National Library of Medicine with Multimedia Software, Inc. for the exhibition Emotions and Disease.

Tiger in the wild (including close-up). Graphic: Photographic reproduction from Emotions and Disease video.
Courtesy National Geographic Television.

Fear-response system. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of Emotions and Disease video illustration. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

Neurotransmitters Graphic: photographic reproduction from Emotions and Disease video. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

Optical imaging camera Camera: 14.4 (h) x 13.21 (w) x 21.9 (d).
Courtesy Photometrics, Ltd.

Image created by optical imaging camera. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of imaging camera output.
Courtesy Ehud Kaplan and Richard Everson, Mount Sinai School of Medicine New York.

PET scans of brain activity during transient sadness and happiness. Graphic: Photographic reproductions of PET scans.
Courtesy Mark S. George, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston.

PET scans of brain activity of people who have been asked to look at, listen to, think about or speak a word. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of PET scans.
Courtesy Marcus E. Raichle, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.

Functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) of brain activity of a person looking at faces. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of fMRI.
Courtesy V.P. Clark, K. Keil, J. Ma. Maisog, S. Courteny, L.G. Ungerleider, and J.V. Haxby, National Institute of Mental Health.

Activation of T-cells Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration.

Molecular structure of interleukin-1. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration.
Courtesy: Angela Gronenborn, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

The Immune System and the Nervous System. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of illustration.

Physician examing a sick child. Graphic: Photographic reproduction.
Courtesy National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.

Computerized photomicrographic microscope. Graphic: Photographic reproduction.
Courtesy Leica Inc., Deerfield, Illinois.

In situ hybridization. Graphic reproduction of imaging microscope output.
Courtesy Miles A. Herkenham, National Institute of Mental Health.

Normal circulating human blood. Graphic: Photographic reproduction.
Courtesy Bruce Wetzel and Harry Schaeffer, National Cancer Institute.

Researcher and DNA sequencing gel. Graphic: Photographic reproduction.
Courtesy National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.


A Dynamic Balance

Overactive hypothalamus. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of Emotions and Disease video illustration. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

An overactive amygdala Graphic: Photographic reproduction of Emotions and Disease video illustration. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

Interruption of the brain/immune system communication. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of Emotions and Disease video illustration. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

Immune system stuck in the on position. Graphic: Photographic reproduction of Emotions and Disease video illustration. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

Imbalance in the chemical transmission between neurons. Photographic reproduction of Emotions and Disease video illustration. Illustrated by Bob Howard Computer Graphics.

Back to top with arrow pointing towards the top of the page