Skip Navigation Bar
 

Harry Potter -  Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine. See our Traveling Exhibition & Resources banner.

Do Mandrakes Really Scream? Magic and Medicine in Harry Potter banner image map.

Introduction page featuring a red background, introduction written in a white lettering script.  In the center is an image of an interior view of alchemy workshop showing the alchemist and many symbols important to alchemy, such as the rising sun, the moon, a lion and a serpent, a scale, a square, plants, a cross/caduceus, and most importantly, fire. A blue background with Who is Nicholas Flamel? written in white lettering script at the bottom. In the center is a head and shoulders, full face illustration of Nicholas Flamel. A green background with Magical Creatures and Magical Plants written in white lettering script at the bottom. In the center is a white unicorn A purple background with Classes at Hogwarts written in white lettering script at the bottom. In the center is an interior view of a pharmacy; showing the master, standing and pointing to shelves of apothecary jars, instructing the novice who is sitting at a table with an open book. Do Mandrakes Really Scream? Magic and Medicine in written in blue lettering with Harry Potter written in red lettering.

Who is Nicholas Flamel? And other historical figures written in white script letters with a red background.

There have been many reports of the Philosopher's Stone over the centuries, but the only Stone currently in existence belongs to Mr. Nicholas Flamel, the noted alchemist and opera lover. From a historical book found in Hogwart's library, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J.K. Rowling written in black lettering.

La Metalllique Transformation by Nicolas Flamel open to show the title page.Head and shoulders, full face illustration of Nicholas Flamel.In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Nicholas Flamel is featured as the creator of the "Philosopher's Stone." Because this stone allows its owner to live forever, it must be protected from falling into the hands of the evil Lord Voldemort.

Although Harry Potter is fictional, Frenchman Nicolas Flamel lived during the late 14th and early 15th centuries. A scholar and scribe, Flamel devoted his life to understanding the text of a mysterious book filled with encoded alchemical symbols that some believed held the secrets of the Philosopher's Stone.

Many myths surround Flamel, including the belief that he successfully created the Stone. His death in 1417 didn’t hurt that myth, and his quest for the Philosopher's Stone lives on in his writings. Although modern scholarship has cast doubt on the authenticity of alchemical texts ascribed to him, he remains an important figure in the alchemical world.

Ron was more interested in eating the frogs than looking at the Famous Witches and Wizards cards, but Harry couldn't keep his eyes off them. Soon he not only had Dumbledore and Morgana… but Paracelsus and Merlin. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J.K. Rowling written in black lettering.

Aurei velleris oder der Guldin Schatz und Kunstkammer by Paracelsus open to show his portrait on the left page and beginning of the book on the right page.Half length, standing portrait of Paracelsus with his hand on sword; coat-of-arms and other detail. Latin text around square.In Harry Potter, Paracelsus is identified as one of the famous wizards featured on the collectible wizard cards found in packets of Chocolate Frog candy.

A 16th century Swiss alchemist, physician, astrologer and occultist, Paracelsus is an historical figure as well. Best known as a medical radical, Paracelsus attacked what he saw as outdated Classical medicine. Paracelsus was also fascinated with alchemy — a medieval pseudo-science and philosophy focused on the transmutation of base metals into gold, a universal cure for disease, and a means of indefinitely prolonging life. The Swiss alchemist is usually depicted with his sword, which many believed stored the elixir of life in the pommel.

Chocolate Frogs have cards inside them, you know, to collect-famous witches or wizards. I've got five hundred, but I haven't got Agrippa or Ptolemy. Ron Weasley on the train to Hogwart's School, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J.K. Rowling written black lettering.

Head and shoulders, left side view of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa in an arch surrounded by butterflies.Although Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa is mentioned in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone only in passing, the 16th century alchemist, astrologer, and writer authored one of the most influential books on the occult during his lifetime.

De occulta philosophia libri tres by Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim open to page CXL and CXL1.Agrippa's De occulta philosophia libri tres is a study of elemental, celestial, and intellectual magic. The book discusses the four classical elements (earth, air, fire, and water), astrology, numbers, angels, gods, mystical names and virtues, and how they relate to medicine and alchemy.