Skip Navigation Bar

Education

Higher Education Modules

  • Patient Zero and the Early North American HIV/AIDS Epidemic

    Chart depicting sexual contacts among homosexual men with AIDS in a study.

    Patient Zero and the Early North American HIV/AIDS Epidemic , developed by Richard A. McKay, is a module for college and university undergraduates and their instructors that incorporates readings, audio-visual materials, and discussion questions. The module blends the histories of medicine, public health, and sexuality in an exploration of a particular set of social, cultural, and medical responses to the emergence of the human immunodeficiency virus in North America in the 1980s. These coalesced around the idea that AIDS in North America could be traced to a single, identifiable individual. Designed to complement general survey courses in the history of public health and history of medicine, the module can also be used to enrich courses in sexuality studies, cultural studies, and a variety of social science programs.

  • Responding to Aids: History, Politics and Visual Culture

    Black and white photograph of a pair of hands holding up a sign on a city street.

    Responding to AIDS: History, Politics and Visual Culture is a module developed by Eric W. Boyle. The module offers college and university students and professors ways to explore the history of AIDS in the United States by examining how public health authorities, politicians, scientists, activists, and patients responded to the epidemic. It provides readings and discussion questions designed to develop students’ understanding of the relationship between politics and scientific practice, the role of visual culture in our understanding of health and illness, and how health activism and advocacy shape public policy.

  • Society at Odds: the Evolution of AIDS Outreach and Education in America

    Color photograph of a safety pin on a red sweater. The pin has a yellow roadside on it.

    Society at Odds: the Evolution of AIDS Outreach and Education in America is a module developed for undergraduate courses by Emily W. Easton, MA. The module offers college and university students, instructors, and professors a cultural-history perspective on AIDS education and outreach in the 1980s, emphasizing the differences and similarities between local activist efforts, and more nationally focused government campaigns that aimed to educate and inform the public as AIDS became a growing health issue for Americans.