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History of Medicine

| Jeffrey S. Reznick| Kenneth M. Koyle | Michael North | Michael Sappol |

Jeffrey S. Reznick, Ph.D.,

Chief of the History of Medicine Division


Head and shoulders, full face photograph of Jeffrey S. Reznick wearing glasses.

Jeffrey S. Reznick, Ph.D.,
Chief


  • Contact Details

    Building 38, Room 1E21
    National Library of Medicine
    8600 Rockville Pike
    Bethesda, MD 20894-3819

    jeffrey.reznick@nih.gov
    Office phone: (301) 496-5406
    Fax: (301) 402-0872

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  • Professional Experience


    Current Position


    Chief, History of Medicine Division 2011-

    National Library of Medicine
    Bethesda, MD


    Immediate Past Position

    Deputy Chief, History of Medicine Division 2009-2011

    National Library of Medicine
    Bethesda, MD

    Jeffrey Reznick joined the History of Medicine Division in November 2009, following his tenure as director of the Institute for the Study of Occupation and Health of the American Occupational Therapy Foundation. Previously, he served as senior curator of the National Museum of Health and Medicine of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, as Executive Director and Senior Research Fellow of the Orthotic and Prosthetic Assistance Fund, and as Assistant Director of the Institute for Comparative and International Studies at Emory University.

    Dr. Reznick's record of scholarly historical research is as extensive as his executive career in the national nonprofit sector. As a social and cultural historian of medicine and war, he is author of two books, both published by Manchester University Press in its Cultural History of Modern War series, as well as numerous book reviews, articles for the popular press, and entries in major reference works. Besides holding active membership in several professional historical associations, including the American Historical Association and American Association for the History of Medicine, Dr. Reznick is a member of the University of Birmingham’s Center for War Studies and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, which was founded in 1868 and remains the foremost society in Great Britain promoting and defending the scholarly study of the past.

    Dr. Reznick has lectured nationally and internationally on a variety of historical and contemporary health subjects. During the past decade he has offered dozens of presentations to academic and non-academic audiences alike at healthcare professional meetings and institutions including Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Center for the Intrepid at Brooke Army Medical Center of Fort Sam Houston, Harvard University, The Johns Hopkins University’s Institute of the History of Medicine, London’s Imperial War Museum, University of Barcelona, University of London’s Institute of Historical Research, Smith College, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, and Villanova University. Complementing these public presentations are Dr. Reznick’s numerous interviews with national and regional press, including CBS Sunday Morning, The Christian Science Monitor, Emory Magazine, KUNC Public Radio, The New York Times, Rochester Review, Time Magazine, Washingtonian Magazine , and WUSA Channel 9 News of Washington, DC.

    In the trajectory of his career in academe and the non-profit sector, Dr. Reznick has served as an advisor to a number organizations including the Disability and Health Workgroup of the National Association of County and City Health Officials, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Howard University Public Health Council, and The Polus Center for Social and Economic Development’s Disability Leadership Institute in Léon Nicaragua, an initiative funded by the Patrick Leahy War Victims Fund and The Pan-American Health Organization. Dr. Reznick is also a former member of the board of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine, having served that nonprofit organization for nearly seven years before joining the staff of the NLM.

    A native of Rochester, New York, Dr. Reznick lives in Rockville, Maryland, with his wife and daughters. He received his MA and PhD from Emory University and his B.A. from the University of Rochester, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa.

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  • Books


    John Galsworthy and Disabled Soldiers of the Great War: With an Illustrated Selection of His Writings, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009. (paperback edition to be published in 2014)

    Healing the Nation: Soldiers and the Culture of Caregiving in Britain during the Great War, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005. (paperback edition published in 2011)

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  • Articles and Chapters

    Selected other publications:


    "Garden Landscapes of the Great War" in Nicholas Saunders and Paul Cornish (eds.), Conflict Landscapes: Materiality and Meaning in Contested Places, New York: Routledge, Material Culture, Conflict and Modernity series, 2014.

    "Material culture and the ‘after-care’ of disabled soldiers in First World War Britain," in Nicholas Saunders and Paul Cornish (eds.), Bodies in Conflict: Corporeality, Materiality, and Transformation, New York: Routledge, Material Culture, Conflict and Modernity series, 2014.

    "Remains of War: Walt Whitman, Civil War Soldiers, and the Legacy of Medical Collections", (with Lenore Barbian and Paul Sledzik) in Museum History Journal, 5 (1) 2012. Winner of the 2013 Best Article Award from the Archivists and Librarians in the History of the Health Sciences (ALHHS)

    "The Mess Kit & The Silver Chev’: American Military Hospital Magazines of the First World War", in Michael Sappol (ed.), Hidden Treasure: 175 Years of the National Library of Medicine, 2011.

    "Walt Whitman: ‘A Feather in My Wings", (with Elizabeth Fee) in American Journal of Public Health, 101 (6) 2011.

    "Perspectives [on the Future of Medical History] from the History of Medicine Division of the United States National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health", in Medical History, 55 (3) 2011.

    "History at the Intersection of Disability and Public Health: The Case of John Galsworthy and Disabled Soldiers of the First World War", in Disability and Health Journal, 4 (1) 2011.

    "Historical Perspectives on the Care of Military Service Members with Limb Amputations", (with Jeffrey Gamble and Alan Hawk) in Paul Pasquina (ed.) Textbook of Military Medicine: Rehabilitation Medicine, Washington, DC: Borden Institute of the United States Army Medical Department Center and School, 2010.

    "Beyond 'War and Military Medicine': Social Factors in the Development of Prosthetics", in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 89 (1) January 2008.

    "Metropolitan Hospitals" (with Sophie Delaporte, Paul Lerner, Peter Leese and Jay Winter) in Jean-Louis Robert and Jay Winter (eds.), Capital Cities at War: Paris, London, Berlin 1914-1919, volume 2, Cambridge University Press, 2007.

    "Prosthetics and Propaganda in the Great War", in Nicholas Saunders (ed.), Matter of Conflict: Material Culture, Memory and the First World War, London: Routledge, 2004.

    "Work-therapy and the Disabled British Soldier in Britain in the First World War: The Case of Shepherd’s Bush Military Hospital, London", in David A. Gerber (ed.), Disabled Veterans in History, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

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  • Reviews


    Beth Linker, War’s Waste: Rehabilitation in World War I America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011, in Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 87 (4) 2013

    Ana Carden-Coyne, Reconstructing the Body: Classicism, Modernism, and the First World War. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, in The American Historical Review, 116 (2) 2011.

    David M. Turner and Kevin Stagg (eds.), Social Histories of Disability and Deformity. New York: Routledge, 2007, in Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 84 (1) 2010

    Marion Girard, A Strange and Formidable Weapon: British Responses to World War I Poison Gas, Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 2008, in Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 64 (2) 2009.

    Theresa Meade and David Serlin (eds.), Radical History Review: Disability and History (special issue) 94 (2006) in Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 82 (1) 2008.

    Fred Pelka (ed.), The Civil War Letters of Colonel Charles F. Johnson, Invalid Corps, Boston: University of Massachusetts Press, 2004, in Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 80 (3) 2006.

    Vincent Cirillo, Bullets and Bacilli: The Spanish-American War and Military Medicine, New Brunswick, NY: Rutgers University Press, 2004, in Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 60 (3) 2005.

    Peter Leese, Shell Shock: Traumatic Neurosis and the British Soldiers of the First World War, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002, in Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 79 (1) 2005.

    Eric Gruber von Arni, Justice to the Maimed Soldier: Nursing, Medical Care, and Welfare for Sick and Wounded Soldiers during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum, 1642-1660, Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2001, in Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 78 (4) 2004.

    Deborah Cohen, The War Come Home: Disabled Veterans in Britain and Germany, 1914-1939. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001, in Journal of Social History, 37 (2) 2003.

    Katherine Ott, et. al., (eds.), Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics, New York University Press, 2002, in Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 77 (3) 2003.

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  • Contributions to Reference Works


    "Medicine and Medical Instruments" in Helen Sheumaker and Shirley Teredsa Wajda (eds.), Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life, New York: ABC-CLIO, 2007.

    "Eugenics" and "Public Health" in John Merriman and Jay Winter (eds.), Encyclopedia of Europe 1914-2006 in the Scribner World History European Series, New York, NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2006.

    "John Galsworthy" in Gary L. Albrecht (ed.), Encyclopedia of Disability, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2005.

    Revisions of four-dozen biographies of medical and scientific figures in The New Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.

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  • Articles in the popular press


    "Remembering the Code Talkers", George Mason University’s History News Network, November 9, 2012.

    "Rediscovering Walt Whitman’s Soldiers" (with Lenore Barbian and Paul Sledzik), George Mason University’s History News Network, February 13, 2012.

    "This Veterans Day, Let’s Reflect on the D.C. War Memorial", George Mason University’s History News Network, November 7, 2011.

    "Remember the Army Medical Library and Discover the National Library of Medicine", George Mason University’s History News Network, October 30, 2011.

    "Preserving History at the National Library of Medicine", (with Kristi Davenport, Peter Gabriele, Stephen Greenberg, Holly Herro, Christie Moffatt, and Paul Theerman), George Mason University’s History News Network, May 30, 2011.

    "U.S. National Library of Medicine Celebrates 175 Years", George Mason University’s History News Network, March 14, 2011.

    "Remembering Frank Buckles, the Last Doughboy of World War I", George Mason University’s History News Network, February 28, 2011.

    "Remembering John Galsworthy: International Advocate for Soldiers Disabled in War", George Mason University’s History News Network, November 8, 2010.

    "The 'Convalescent Blues' in Frederick Cayley Robinson's 'Acts of Mercy'", Wellcome Library blog, June 23, 2010.

    "Serving on the Front Lines: A History of Occupational Therapy in Wartime," in Facets Magazine of the University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, November 2009.

    "Memorial Day, the Great War, and America’s Last Surviving World War I Veteran", George Mason University’s History News Network, May 26, 2008.

    "Memories of the Great War", The Washington Post, November 12, 2007, 20A; subsequently quoted in The Express Quoted: Remembering Veterans and a Memorial.

    "Honor WWI Vets Before They’re All Gone", in The Baltimore Sun, November 11, 2005, 15A.

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