Skip Navigation Bar
 

Guide to Oral Histories in Medicine and the Health Sciences

ViaHealth Archives Consortium


List of Interviewees


  • WALTER FENSTERMACHER, M.D. (Chief of Surgery, 1947-53) /Raymond Hinshaw, M.D., (2/3/1984) Recalls early years as an intern and resident at R.G.H. Started a blood bank at the Hospital in late 1930s. Describes formation of the 19th General Hospital and recounts World War II experiences, both stateside and later in England and France. After term as Chief of Surgery, became chief medical officer in the Emergency Department. Has fond memories of Howard Prince and Dr. Edward Wentworth.
  • JOHN BARNELL, M.D. (Chairman, Medical Board, 1955-57, 58-59, 66-68) /Paul Weld, M.D. and Al Davis (10/1/1984) Remembers early years of practice as a general surgeon who was an early graduate of the RGH surgical training program. Describes the surgical residency program as it was practiced during his training and discusses the beginning of the Rochester General Hospital/University of Rochester affiliation.
  • MILTON BOHROD, M.D. (Chief of Pathology and Laboratories, 1943-70) /Theodore VanZandt, M.D. (10/10/1984) Fourth pathologist at R.G.H. since 1901. Attracted to the area by Eastman School and high quality of medicine. Comments on the astronomical rise in number of "tests" and in cost of equipment between 1910 and 1970. Recalls establishment of first School of Medical Photography under J. Beiter. Remembers Dr. Leo Cravitz, first professional microbiologist. Describes strained relations with U of R until Dr. Orbison became chair of Pathology Department. Bohrod led Friday staff conferences and initiated the visiting professor program.
  • DAVID S. PARKER, M.D. (Attending Physician in Urology, 1954-84) /William Africano, M.D. (10/16/1984) Recounts education: Albany Medical School, Urology residency at U of R. Recalls activities in 19th General during WWII; duty in Louisiana, England, France. Outlines evolution of prostatectomies, from perineal to suprapubic to endoscopic, resulting in marked decrease in urethral strictures, urinary sepsis and bladder stones. Covers moral and legal considerations in vasectomy for sterilization during the fifties. Relates anecdotes about increased incidence of bladder and kidney cancers due to local spraying of orchards and their prevention by Vitamin C.
  • FREDERICK BUSH, M.D. (Chief of Pediatrics, 1947-55) /Joseph Incavo, M.D.(10/14/1984) Recalls that until sulfonamides in late 1930s there was no specific treatment for most infections, which frequently subsided spontaneously. Notes that pasteurization of milk, promoted by Dr. George Goler, curtailed infantile diarrhea, and explains Dr. Albert Kaiser's research on indications for tonsillectomy. An RGH innovation: a regional center for premature newborns started by Dr. Townsend, was the first in the area and one of the first in the country. Notes the extinction of poliomyelitis, rheumatic fever, and scarlet fever and the increase in the frequency of degenerative and genetic disorders
  • ANDRIES ROODENBERG, M.D. (Attending Physician in Medicine, 1959-85) Norman Loomis, M.D. (11/30/1984)Recounts experiences in music and medicine during childhood and youth in Holland. Reviews early training at the Mayo Clinic with Dr. M. Bohrod and their coming to RGH. Reminisces about intimacy of RGH Westside and Friday Conferences. Discusses keeping up with latest advances in immunology by auditing course at U of R. In retirement, continues playing violin, performing at several local concerts per year, and enjoys sailing and bicycling.
  • LEO CRAVITZ, Dr. P.H. (Director of Microbiology Laboratory, 1946-84) Donald Goldman, M. D. (12/14/1984) Relates reasons for coming to RGH. Traces progress of early antibiotic testing and epidemiological work. Remembers Friday Conferences. Explains his association with the U of R Medical School, his role in resident teaching, and professional work with pathologists. Talks about RGH School of Medical Technology.
  • JOHN STATES, M.D. and DAVID STATES, M.D. (Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, 1969-88 and Attending Physician in Orthopedic Surgery, 1971-96) /Paul Weld, M.D. (1 /18/1985) Brothers and colleagues in orthopedics talk about their early life with their physician father, Eugene States. Discuss the U of R orthopedic residency program, orthopedic medicine at Kodak, and John's pioneering work in automotive safety.
  • MARGUERITE KODERL, R.N., M.S.N. (Vice President for Nursing, 1957-72) Mary M. Stritzel (1/18/1985) Discusses her training and early nursing career in N.Y.C; work on M.S.N. degree at the Uof R., and cordial relations with Dr. Parnall, Jr. Describes the geographic split of the hospital into Westside and Northside and the start up of Intensive and Coronary Care Units. Covers the closing of the Registered Nurse training school and the opening of the Practical Nursing School which reflected the increasing use of LPNs and the developing role of nurses and nurse practitioners in patient education and counseling.
  • MARION WHITBECK (President, RGH Women's Board, 1958-59) /Paul Weld, M.D. (3/13/1985) Began volunteering in 1949 and served RGH as a member of two of the Hospital's women's governing bodies. Offers her impressions of various hospital administrators during her term of service. Recalls physicians who were prominent during her youth. Discusses the important contributions and activities of the Twigs and their reason for existing.
  • LOUIS SPECTOR, M.D. (Attending Physician in Family Medicine, 1968-91 Jacques Lipson, M.D. (3/1611985) Relates early life in Rochester, undergraduate education at U. of Alabama, and how his first application to U of R Medical School was denied because quota for Jews had been filled. First two years of medical school spent at U of Alabama, last 2 at U. of Chicago. Appointed resident at Genesee Hospital and then maintained general practice in home on St. Paul Street. Served in U.S. Army 1941-46, including participation in Battle of the Bulge. Retirement activities: philanthropy, playing flute and bridge, and traveling.
  • ARTHUR LOWENTHAL (Member, RGH Board of Directors, 1934-1966) Paul Weld, M.D. and Alfred L. Davis (3/13/1985) Ninety-seven years old when he was interviewed, Mr. Lowenthal recalls serving as a member of the RGH Board of Directors for many years. He remembers urging the hospital to buy its first CT scanner, his work in starting Blue Cross in this community, and his leadership in getting the Hochstein Music School started.
  • MAX PRESBERG, M.D. (Chief of Ophthalmology, 1956-68) /John Barnell, M.D. (5/4/1985) Received undergraduate degree from U of R and medical degree from Uof R School of Medicine. Describes advances in technology between 1940s and 1980s relating to ophthalmology: corneal storage, laser surgery, and electromyography. Discusses interest in music, especially the violin; serves on Board of Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. Acknowledges generosity of the Twigs who donated the Laser Ophthalmology apparatus.
  • DAVID A. SHERMAN, M.D. (Chief of Anesthesiology, 1971-84) /Kreag Donovan, Esq. (6/21/1985) Contrasts medical education in U.S. and Great Britain where he trained. Discusses activities as a member of the NYS Professional Medical Conduct Board. Covers the expansion of the Anesthesiology Department at RGH, the scheduling of operating room time, and the evolution of relations between the Medical Staff and the Board of Directors. Outlines duties of the Chief of Anesthesia. Reviews recent developments in pain medicine, acupuncture, rationing of medical care. Compares Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency with socialized medicine in England.
  • CHARLES B. F. GIBBS, M.D. (Attending Physician in Medicine, 1939-80) /Andries Roodenberg, M.D. (11/2/1985) Internist and diabetician, revered by his patients. Came to Rochester in 1921 and practiced at both RGH Westside and Strong; Discusses physicians and practices at old West Side from 1921 onward. Recalls Sunday noon medical conferences led by Dr. Mulligan in the 1920s. Describes early pioneering with insulin and discovery of glucagon.
  • MARY STRITZEL, R.N. (Director of Nursing, 1982-86) /Rev. Donald Schwab (3/18/1986) Recalls entering the Emergency Department as a new graduate after having had six children. Outlines the changes in nursing roles, beginning with Florence Nightingale, an independent practitioner, and evolving into people who carry out doctors' orders; notes the current movement towards more autonomy for nurses. Discusses the "high touch" vs. "high tech." debate in patient care. Criticizes substandard pay for nurses (because it is a female profession) and notes the need to prioritize care due to limited time.
  • CHARLES TUKE, M.D. (Attending Physician in Pediatrics, 1961 -89) /Paul Weld, M.D.(2/19/1986) Born, raised, educated in Rochester (except for Medical School at Syracuse U.). Served internship with U.S. Army where he had extensive experience with amputees and paraplegics; awarded residencies in Pathology at Cleveland City and Boston Children's Hospitals and in Pediatrics at Boston City Hospital. Remembers treating streptococcal and staphylococcal infections with penicillin early and talks about the elimination of polio, both advances reducing the need for pediatric hospital beds. Relates confrontation with Ted Townsend over Board examinations which he passed on second try.
  • J. LA RUE WILEY, M.D. (Section Chief, Neurosurgery, 1959-71) /Joshua Hollander, M.D. (6/12/1986) Mentions role of early neurosurgeons at RGH. Demand for neurosurgeons increased when herniated intervertebral disc was recognized as a clinical entity. Traces the formation of neurosurgical section as part of the Department of Surgery at RGH and the controversial affiliation with the U of R for teaching. Outlines advances in central and peripheral nervous system imaging: air studies, CT Scanning, MR Imaging, angiography, ultrasound. Cites newer neurosurgical operations: cerebrospinal fluid shunts, use of operating microscope, laser, stereotaxy.
  • LEAH GUTHRIE, R.N.; OLIVE MARCHESE, R.N.; MARGARET ROGERS, R.N. (Graduates, RGH School of Nursing, 1914; 1927; 1932) /Katherine McMahon, R.N.(6/18/1986) Graduates of the Rochester General Hospital School of Nursing review elements of training and life experienced by students in the first third of the twentieth century. Leah Guthrie reviews daily routines of nurses in training. Olive Marchese recalls unusual treatments including milk and molasses enemas. Margaret "Bucky" Rogers recounts additional anecdotes, including starting the work day in "that beautiful chapel" at 6:30
  • J. RAYMOND HINSHAW, M.D. (Chief of Surgery, 1966-88) /William Africano, M.D. (5/17/1986) Fourth generation physician, Rhodes scholar, and burn researcher at the U of R. Served as the first full-time academic surgeon at RGH. Describes early fiefdoms in general surgery at RGH. Discusses introduction of laser surgery and research in the development of CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) test. Explains how hospital financing affected efficiency and promoted ambulatory surgery. Sees the future goal for RGH as seeking the highest degree of excellence in specific rather than all fields of surgery.
  • ROBERT CLARK, M.D. (Chief of Dermatology, 1962-73) Paul Weld, M.D. (7/22/1986) Remarks about the friendliness of the old Westside Rochester General Hospital. Reminisces about some of his old friends. Discusses the changing trends in dermatology. Outlines changes in the residency program at the U of R.
  • WILLIAM MACVAY, M.D. (Attending Physician in Medicine, 1955-82) /Walter Fenstermacher, M.D. (11/29/1986) Explains why he came to RGH for 2nd year of internship in 1927. Comments on his involvement in the preparation of the Centennial History. Describes the Sunday Conferences. Reviews experiences in training for Base Hospital 19 in Louisiana and overseas.
  • ROBERT KENNEDY, M.D. (Chief of Ophthalmology, 1968-75) /Fred Bush, M.D. (11/21/1986) Early training: undergraduate education at U of R; Medical degree from Syracuse U. Medical School. Credits father's influence in his becoming a doctor. Describes invaluable experience in eye surgery at U.S. Army Brooks Center in 1951. Relates the development of the Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Ophthalmologic Society. During practice in Rochester has witnessed an amazing evolution in the treatment of cataracts and in laser surgery. Recounts experiences with the Ship Hope and with CARE in Africa and South America.
  • WILLIAM HART, M.D. (Chief of Psychiatry, 1966-87) /Arthur Liebert (6/1/1987) Discusses the formation and development of the Rochester Mental Health Center as well as alcohol and methadone detoxification services. Compares tuberculosis with mental health problems. Reviews state mental health programs and examines political and personality conflicts at the state level. Discusses the stigma of mental disease.
  • JOHN FELTNER, M.D. (Attending Physician in Orthopedics, 1956-91) /Paul Weld, M.D. (2/4/1987) Describes the practice of medicine during the Great Depression. Remembers living accommodations and house staff duties of the past. Theorizes that skiing led him into orthopedics. Reviews medicine as practiced during World War II.
  • CHARLES SAHLER, M.D. (Chief of Surgery, 1959-66) /Joseph Geary, M.D (3/7/1987) Reviews rotating internship, surgical residency, and ambulance duty for house officers. Explains how the formation of the Tissue Committee in the 1940s reduced the number of unnecessary appendectomies. Contrasts pay of young surgeons in the 1940s with fees of senior surgeons. Recalls the town-gown conflict from the 1920s to the 1960s. Describes how RGH obtained Dr. Hinshaw as the first full-time Chief of Surgery.
  • CHARLES LEWIS, M.D. (Chief of Radiation Oncology & Nuclear Medicine, 1974-83) /Paul Weld, M.D. (6/2/1987) Remembers pre-World War II events and gives observations about medical schooling during the War in England. Discusses the development of Radiation Therapy at RGH and at the U of R. as well as Nuclear Scanning and the creation of the Division of Oncology.
  • CONSTANCE LUCIA, R.N. (Supervisor/Instructor, Surgical Nursing, 1949-1953) Eileen Atwood, R.N.; M.S. (9/9/1987) Miss Lucia relates her experiences of being accepted into nursing school and her early employment during the Great Depression. Recalls that after post-graduate nursing experience in NYC, she returned to RGH. Explains that as Nursing Arts Instructor she taught students decorum; they knew her as a firm teacher, but one with a sense of humor. Before she retired, Miss Lucia worked as a consultant to the Michigan Board of Nursing.
  • AGNES BARTLETT CURTIS (Chairman, RGH Women's Board, 1945; 1952-53) William Africano, M.D. (6/26/1987) One of several generations of a family that have served Rochester General Hospital, three of whom acted as presidents of Women's Boards. Describes being associated with her stepfather's Red Cross Hospital in France during WWI when she was in her teens. From 1920 on volunteered prodigiously in Emergency Dept., clinics, Aide Service, Twigs, and on Women's Boards. Held national administrative responsibility in American Red Cross during WWII. Discusses transition from Westside to Northside division.
  • DONALD SPRATT, M.D. (Chief of Obstetrics-Gynecology, 1973-89) /Paul Weld, M.D. (2/12/1988) Reviews training: medical school at U of Buffalo and internship at RGH. Served 1st year residency in obstetrics at RGH where he was on call 24 hours per day for the entire year. Relates experiences in military as a medical officer on a transport ship during the Korean War. Reviews the development of the Ob-Gyn residency program at RGH. Recalls his years as President of the Medical Staff.
  • FRANK JEDD, M.D. (Attending Physician in Surgery, 1955-76) /Joseph Geary, M.D.(6/10/1988) Recalls internship at Westside, ambulance calls, members of his intern class. Describes tour of Pacific Theater duty in US Army during WWII. Explains post war preceptorship with Dr. Don Houghton. Discusses early health plan arrangements and notes infrequency of malpractice suits. Reviews town/gown antipathy. Reminisces about relationship with Dr. C.Sahler.
  • HELEN MERRILL, ANGELO DINI (Widow, E. Forrest Merrill, M.D. Chief of Radiology, 1925-29; 48-61) (Director of Personnel, 1967-75) /Joint Interview (3/10/1989) Mrs. Merrill relates the circumstances that led to their coming to Rochester in mid 1920s. Mr. Dini, formerly a technician under Dr. Merrill, recalls social occasions in the department and outlines new responsibilities taken on by members of the Department of Radiology as technology expanded, including EKG, the School of Radiology Technology, ortho-therapy. He also recounts an anecdote about his stint as personnel officer for the 19th General which preceded his tenure as personnel director at RGH.
  • WERNER HALPERN, M.D. (Attending Physician in Psychiatry, 1964-89) /Nelson Spies (7/7/1988) A legend in the care, diagnosis and treatment of disturbed children. Describes the broad development of community health agencies and centers. In the 1920s efforts by the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children led to the creation of the Rochester Guidance Center which in turn evolved into Rochester General Hospital Mental Health Center, a much larger treatment facility. Describes the complexities of modern day psychological cases and family problems.
  • SHARON McHUGH (Administrative Coordinator, Physical Medicine, 1971-89) Paul Weld, M.D. (2/10/1989) Reviews her early experience as a student physical therapist at RGH. Recollects subsequent leadership in the Inhalation Therapy Section, work as head physical therapist, U of R Medical School teaching affiliation, involvement with the Heart Association's stroke program, and the swallowing program in speech therapy. Discusses her important contributions to the RGH employee exercise programs, including the colorful wheelchair basketball games.
  • DONALD RAINES, M.D. (Chief of Otolaryngology, 1967-90) /Self-Interviewed (1/8/1990) Reviews challenges in starting solo practice in the 1950s; wholesale tonsillectomies performed at both Westside and Northside divisions from 1956-66. Discusses the patient care gains with high technology, but increase in potential risks because patients are more critical. Reviews opposition to opening of the Wilson Center during his term as president of the Medical Staff. Discusses the chaotic and controversial formation of the Monroe Plan and its evolution into respected managed care Medicaid program. Reviews development of Ambulatory Surgical Care Center with D. Sherman and ROM's cooperation with the U of R in ENT residency program.
  • MARGARET (Mickey) BERGE (Widow of Wilfred Berge, Attending Physician in Surgery, 1956-82) /David Berge, P.A.(3/5/1990) Memories of the friendly atmosphere at RGH in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Remembers how she met her future husband, Dr. Wilfred Berge, who came to RGH as an intern while she was working in the X-ray Department. Describes experiences during World War II when Dr. Berge was a surgeon at Walter Reed Hospital. Presents a lovely tribute to the life and work of Dr. Wilfred Berge.
  • M. LAURENS ROWE, M.D. (Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, 1956-62) /David States, M.D. (2/26/1990) Reviews medical discharge from the Navy, residency at Mayo Clinic and Cincinnati General. Remembers intimacy of RGH; everyone on staff knew each other. Recalls Dr. Bohrod's beautiful color slides. Covers his term as President of the Medical Staff when RGH affiliated with the U of R and Strong Memorial. Describes 20-year study of low back problems in conjunction with industrial medicine at Kodak. Discusses the formation of a retired physicians group at the Academy of Medicine. Retirement activities: water color painting and building ship models.
  • SYDNEY ROY CABLE, M.D. (Chief of Family Medicine, 1960-62) /Joseph Geary, M.D. (4/23/1990) Reviews joining Dr. Libby Pulsifer at the outset of his practice. After serving in Doctor's Draft, returned to intern at RGH Westside. Explains rotating internship. Describes ambulance service and living accommodations at the Hospital. Remembers starting own practice by taking over Dr. Matt Fairbanks' patients. Compares era when hospitals were less in competition with each other and physicians were more autonomous, when malpractice suits were rare and the physician negotiated fees with the patient with practicing medicine today. Reviews how he met Mrs. Cable, mentions their children, and details retirement activities.
  • GERALD STONE, M.D. (Attending Physician in Medicine, 1970-) /Paul Weld, M.D. (4/30/1990) Discusses his medical training at Vanderbilt University and Strong Memorial Hospital. Reviews the inception of renal dialysis at RGH, including the problems that arose. Part of the interview is a beautiful tribute to Dr. Ed Chappelle, a close friend and colleague.
  • ROBERT PEARTREE, M.D. (Section Chief, Urology, 1971-80) /Gerald Stone, M.D. (5/17/1990) Attended Syracuse University Medical School and served residency in Syracuse. Established Rochester practice in 1963 with Dr. David Parker. Served as president of the RGH Medical Staff from 1978-80 and of Monroe County Medical Society in 1982-83; recalls 25 years of combined Urology residency with the U of R. Recalls that percutaneous nephrolithotripsy reduced the need for major surgery for kidney stones, but equipment is very costly. Notes that early renal dialysis of a patient took all day. Explains how Strong became center for renal transplantation, while RGH became the home for dialysis.
  • ROBERT CARRIER, M.D. (Chief of Orthopedics, 1988-95) /David States, M.D. (4/30/1990) Relates early life in New Jersey, Uof R Medical School interview with Dean Whipple, Army service as a proctologist, and early emergency department experience at three hospitals. Notes surgical procedures which are no longer done today. Recalls advent of arthroscopy and joint replacement, and increase of internal fixation of fractures. Focuses on socioeconomic aspects of medicine. Reviews professional group involvement: president of Rochester and NYS Orthopedic Societies, member of Monroe County Medical Society and Rochester Academy of Medicine. Observes that the RGH Orthopedics Department’s focus is clinical more than it is research oriented.
  • PRIMITIVO ROCA, M.D. (Chief of Ophthalmology, 1975-95) /Joseph Geary, M.D. (5/24/1990) Summary: Reviews his medical education in Cuba, his post graduate training in New York City, and his association with John Gipner at the University of Rochester at Strong Memorial Hospital where he received ophthalmological training. Discusses modern techniques including use of laser and microscope in ophthalmology and lens implant surgery. Relates the accomplishments of members of his family, particularly his daughter Renee's successes in figure skating
  • SISTER ANN VINCENT DIRITIS & REV. KENNETH VEAZEY (Chaplain, Pastoral Care, 1983-90) & (Director of Pastoral Care) /Joint interview (6/14/1990) Traces the development of Pastoral Care at RGH from a single Catholic chaplain to a full department. Explains the Eucharistic Ministry. Discusses the Pastoral Visitor Program, the Ecumenical Call System, and staff retreats.
  • MARY TILBURY, R.N., Ph.D. (Vice President, Nursing, 1987-90) Nancy McGinn, R.N. (12/14/1984) Attracted to RGH by the Hospital's reputation for teaching. Left position as Director of Nursing at Alexandria (Virginia) Hospital. Arrived during a severe nursing shortage. Instituted programs to modernize the Nursing Department at RGH, improving information services and offering an RN/LPN sabbatical program which encouraged LPNs to upgrade to RN status. Discusses the strategies used to mediate the tensions between LPNs and RNs.
  • GEORGIANNA BECKER, R.N. & EILEEN ATWOOD, R.N., M.S. (Operating Room Instructor, 1974-90) & (Student Education Coordinator, 1958-62) /Joint Interview (10/18/1990) Recall years in School of Nursing, 1958-61, tuition and fees for three-year course, uniform regulations, pride in cap and pin. Discuss era when two hospitals operated simultaneously and transport problems ensued. Recount psychiatric training at Marcy State and Rochester State Hospitals. Discuss changes in technology and analyze how nursing education has evolved since 1950s, especially professionalism. Note current challenges in nursing care associated with shorter hospital stays.
  • DAVID THURBER, M.D. (Attending Physician in Medicine, 1955-86) /Paul Weld, M.D. (1/24/1991) A member of the first accelerated class to graduate from the U of R during World War II. Recalls house staff duties at RGH during the 1940s. Gives rare insight into the contributions of many of the personalities who made RGH a warm, but also a superior, institution. Mentions several people who contributed in significant ways to the friendly and cooperative atmosphere in the Hospital. Recounts how he got involved in the Archives.
  • PAUL WELD, M.D. (Chief of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 1966-91) /J. La Rue Wiley, M.D.(4/5/1991) Reviews early career: Medical School at Yale, residency in medicine and hematology at Buffalo General, Army service during the Korean War. Served as Director of Medical Education at two hospitals in Connecticut. Beginning in 1958 recruited and taught house staff at RGH and worked with the Hemophilia Center; also involved in respiratory therapy and phlebotomy service and in introduction of occupational and speech therapy. Pioneered use of ultrasound at RGH. Founder of and advocate for RGH Archives. Avocations: Adirondack mountain climbing, ornithology, the history of medicine, book collecting.
  • NURSES in the MILITARY LPN Theresa Marsden; RNs Phyllis Hines, Barbara Skromak, Linda Dietsche (Audio only) /Nancy Noonan (1991) Four separate interviews of nurse veterans from the Vietnam War and Desert Storm. Interviewees explore social atmosphere of the U.S. at the outset of each conflict. Analyze reasons why nurses and medical personnel joined in the conflicts. Examine the role of women in men's endeavors. Describe responsibilities during and reactions to combat. Recall activities engaged in and locales visited while on leaves. Assess media coverage of women's activities during the conflicts in contrast to men's exploits.
  • MARION CRAIG POTTER, M.D. (Attending Physician in Obstetrics-Gynecology, 1968-85) /Self Interviewed (6/6/1991) Member of a five-generation line of Rochester physicians that includes her father, James Craig Potter, and grandmother (also named Marion Craig Potter) who practiced in a Strathallen Park home/office. Describes medical practice in the 1920s and recalls that her family installed the first x-ray machine in an office locally. Remembers her 1954 internship at RGH and her residency in Ob-Gyn ending in 1957.
  • ELI LEVEN, M.D. (Attending Physician in Medicine, 1955-89) /Joseph Geary, M.D. (11/7/1991) Describes medical staff life during the 1930s. Discusses nursing homes and death and dying. Remembers early house calls and illegal abortions. Outlines the work and influence of Marion Folsom. Interview gives insight into Dr. Leven's empathy for humanity.
  • HELEN SMITH, R.N. (Director of Housekeeping, 1955-76) /Katherine McMahon, R.N. (6/17/1992) Recalls changing career plans from teaching to nursing because of the Great Depression. A 1934 graduate of the RGH School of Nursing, she rose through the ranks from student to staff nurse to head nurse to supervisor. George Cederberg's urging and an offer of a $50/month raise prompted her to accept position as Director of Housekeeping. Recalls common treatments of the pre-antibiotic period: flaxseed poultices and hot packs, subcutaneous fluids (hypodermoclysis); early ambulation of surgical patients initiated when 19th General surgeons returned from WWII.
  • H. LEON TAYLOR, M.D. & L. HOLLAND TAYLOR, M.D. (Attending Physicians in Medicine, 1964-92 & 1978-91) /Joint interview (6/18/1992) Dr. L. H. Taylor reviews early life, military service, and training at U of R, establishing practice in Greece. Notes that close relationships between physician and patients developed in practice have endured for several years after retirement. Dr. H. Leon Taylor tells of a long family tradition with RGH; mother graduated from the School of Nursing. Recalls the Army, training at U of R, internship at Philadelphia General, and setting up practice in Rochester. Cites recent changes in medical practice, increased paper work and frequent rule changes.
  • MARGARET RATHBUN, M.D. (Consultant in Pediatrics, 1955-76) /Paul Weld, M.D. (6/17/1992) Describes the U of R Medical School during World War II. Remembers the last years of the Rochester Health Bureau and the founding of its successor, the Monroe County Health Department. Relates her experiences as an early woman graduate of the U of R Medical School and her work as a pediatrician and public health physician.
  • ELEANOR WOODBURY, M.D. (Attending Physician in Medicine, 1978-85) /David Thurber, M.D. (6/19/1992) Recounts undergraduate background in New Hampshire, training at the U of R Medical School; her internship and her appointment as the first female resident at RGH. Focuses on conditions she experienced while working and recounts anecdotes about fellow interns and residents. Outlines the obstacles she needed to overcome in establishing a practice locally. Recalls the era when Westside and Northside operated simultaneously.
  • HARRY PHILLIPS, M.D. (Attending Physician in Surgery, 1978-95) /Self interviewed (6/25/1992) Identifies three generations of physicians in the Phillips family; attracted to medicine when he made house calls with his grandfather. Recalls attending the U of R during the Depression and U of R Medical School during WWII. Describes internship and surgical residency at RGH: riding ambulance, early use of penicillin, emergency caused by 1945 train wreck. Reviews surgical service statistics for 1948.
  • WILLIAM KERN, M.D. (President, Medical Staff, 1984-86) /Joseph Geary, M.D. (11/10/1992) Describes the Kern family practice in Greece; sharing home/office with wife who is a physician. Discusses how practice evolved from seeing very ill patients at the outset to seeing long-term patients with the goal of keeping them out of the hospital. Health care insurance led patients to be more demanding and increased paper work. Explains reasons for becoming politically active in Medical and Internists' Society, president of County Medical Society, and president of the Medical Staff. Notes complexities generated by increasingly expensive technologies. Mentions current membership on BC/BS Board and activities with State Legislature with regard to medical practice.
  • EDMUND CLEMENT, M.D. (Chief of Dermatology, 1973-82) /Paul Weld, M.D. (8/13/1992) Reviews early life: childhood in Adirondacks, undergraduate studies at Syracuse U.; graduate work at Albany Med. School, internship at RGH 1961-62. After internship, served in the US Navy for two years followed by a three-year dermatology residency at the U. of Buffalo. Discusses modern changes in dermatology, which is now divided between medically and surgically oriented specialists, and notes the rise in cosmetic treatments. Reveals retirement plans.
  • ONOLEE AUSTIN SERLES (Assistant Financial Secretary, 1936-42) /Margaret Berge (11/10/1992) Describes layout of offices at Westside in late '30s and early '40s. Recalls light-hearted personalities and frequent practical jokes. Notes family atmosphere, especially the social relationships among professional and clerical staffs. Remembers Sophie Alsop, house mother for the house staff. Describes local transportation, and hospital menus. One anecdote illustrates the change in attitudes toward abortion. Touches on community send-off for the 19th General in 1942.
  • NICHOLAS USTICK (Vice President for Personnel, 1973-89) /Paul Weld, M.D. (5/13/1993) Reviews early life: BA and MBA after WWII followed by 20 years in business. Recalls in early 1970s formulating list of 400 issues in human relations; low salaries made it difficult to attract and retain competent people. Initiated improvements in pay and benefits, neutralizing union-organizing activities and helped establish Kinder-Care. Relates how leasing of stretch limousines to shuttle employees to and from off-campus parking drew complaints, but was actually cheaper than using buses. Discusses close monitoring of pension fund by investment advisors.
  • STANLEY TROUP, M.D. (Chief of Medicine, 1965-74) /Richard Gangemi, M.D. (5/14/1993) Describes his internship at U of R and praises Dr. Whipple's welcoming remarks to first year medical students. Reviews the hematology group at the U of R. Recalls his years as the first, full-time faculty Chief of Medicine at RGH. Interview includes tributes to RGH, the staff, and the Board of Trustees.
  • SIDNEY GOLDSTEIN, M.D. (Chief, Cardiology Unit, 1962-74) /Robert Easley, M.D. (5/13/1993) Recounts events that led him to specialize in cardiology and his first experience in practice. Traces developments in cardiology, especially open heart procedures. Because of high mortality rates in the early years, scrutiny of the program and participants was very close. Sees the technological explosion in cardiology as double-edged—beneficial in many ways, but drawing cardiologists' attention away from the patient, focusing it on the machines. The pendulum appears to be adjusting now.
  • CHARLES HOLLANDER, M.D. (Chief of Endocrinology, 1966-69) /His brother, Joshua Hollander, M.D. (5/14/1994) Reviews Dr. Charles Hollander's education - medical school at Columbia, internship at Bellevue, fellowship in endocrinology & residency at Hopkins and Brigham. Served his first academic position at RGH, researching thyroid, pituitary and hypothalamic hormones, as well as serving an active clinical practice. Authored more than 25 papers on T-3 and protein-binding abnormalities. Left RGH to become head of endocrinology division at NYU.
  • ALBERTA COOK, R.N. & KATHERINE McMAHON, R.N. (Surgical Nursing Supervisor, 1972-86) & (Nursing Supervisor, 1955-85) /Joint Interview (4/27/1994) A detailed description of a student nurse's training, duties and social life at Westside RGH during the early 1940s, which ended in her graduation as a registered nurse. Describes nurses' quarters, social lounge, teas and dances. Explains affiliations and instruction at Trudeau, the TB sanitarium, and at the Hudson River State Mental Hospital. Recalls excellent training on the floors, strict but fair supervisors, valued relationships with classmates, leisure time activities. Notes changes in medicine and medical treatment since 1940.
  • JOHN OLSON, M.D. (Section Chief, Hematology, 1979-95) /Paul Weld, M.D.(9/28/1994) Reviews life in rural Wisconsin where his father was the only physician. Medical School and medical residency at U of R. Served on staff of Henry Ford Hospital (Detroit), 1965-74; returned to Rochester as Chief of Hematology at St. Mary's. Involved in pure hematology at RGH; notes that Hemophilia Center at RGH is one of the oldest in the country.Late 1970s, plasma concentrates created for home use and special orthopedic and dental care revolutionized care of hemophiliacs. Recalls tragic contamination of blood supply by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV); nearly half of the hemophiliacs in US were infected.
  • LUCILLE GIGLIA (Director of Volunteers, 1971-94) /Helen Dowdell, R.N. (7/26/1994) Recalls first job at RGH as a part-time secretary in Employee Health Service. In 1971, named Director of Volunteers where she instituted cost savings. Notes the modern need for diversity in gender, age, and ability among volunteers; for example, males, skilled retirees, and physically challenged people are currently serving in volunteer positions. Recognizes an increasing need for ethnically diverse volunteers. Currently 350 volunteers serve a variety of roles, 200 are present in the Hospital on any given day.
  • JOSEPH GEARY, M.D. (Section Chief, Vascular Surgery, 1973-90 /J. LaRue Wiley, M.D. (10/12/1994) Recalls career change to medicine and medical training at Georgetown in 1954. Early training received at St. Mary's, Rochester, Boston City, and Mass. General Hospitals. In 1960 started vascular service at St. Mary's and moved to RGH, spending 30 years here. Mentions new procedures: endovascular aneurysm repair, ultrasonic diagnosis, thrombolytic treatment of clots. Explains how physician-patient communication can reduce malpractice suits. Served active duty in US Navy, 1990-91, at National Naval Medical Center.
  • ARTHUR LIEBERT (President, Chief Executive Officer, RGH, 1972-96) /William Hart, M.D.(12/8/1994) Reviews educational background and internship at RGH. Recounts aborted plans for merger of RGH and Park Ave. Hospitals into North Park. Analyzes the influence of Medicare and Medicaid on healthcare. Discusses financing and construction of Northside. Acknowledges contributions of a very active and cordial RGH Board of Directors. Speculates on future trends in health care: rationing of some procedures based on age, increasing outpatient care, additional costs and accountability, development of comprehensive health systems.
  • RALPH PENNINO, M.D. & KAREN REMINDER, R.N. (Dir., INTERVOL; Dir., Cosmetic Surgery Center, 1996-) & (Nurse, Emergency Dept., 1980-) /Joint Interview (4/13/1995) Dr. Pennino and Ms. Reminder tell about the work of INTERVOL (headed by Pennino) in RUMS (Recycling of Unused Medical Supplies). They note the incredible waste of medical supplies in the U.S. and explain how simple supplies are desperately needed by third world countries. Haiti receives not only recycled supplies, but also tremendous humanitarian assistance from INTERVOL volunteers. This is an incredible tale of selfless humanitarianism by an RGH nurse and a plastic surgeon.
  • RABBI HENRY HYMAN (Hospital Chaplain, 1983-) /Sharon Cerasoli (12/14/1994) A beautiful statement about the importance of pastoral and social work in the total care for sick patients. A point is made that in the hospital setting a chaplain of one denomination can often be of help to those of other faiths. Discusses the special needs of the surviving Holocaust victims when they become hospitalized. Outlines the routines followed by members of the pastoral staff.
  • HOWARD N. HARRISON, Ph.D. (Director of Research & Surgical Education, 1972-94) /Paul Weld, M.D. (1/20/1995) Recruited from the Institute for Surgical Research, San Antonio by Dr. Hinshaw. Details primary duties in surgical research and education; recalls town-gown conflict in 1969. Explains how new training experiences at all Rochester hospitals improved quantity and quality of the residents. Credits Dr. Africano with gaining Board support for the education program. Relates the establishment of the teaching excellence award. Recalls the addition of Physician Assistants to the House Staff, and how State regulations affected working conditions of House Staff.
  • WILLIAM AFRICANO, M.D., PAUL LORTIE, M.D. & EDWARD FLICKINGER, M.D. (President, Medical Staff, 1980-82), (President, Medical Staff, 1986-88) & (Chief of Surgery, 1988-) /Joint Interview (10/26/1995) An informal interchange among three surgeons on the changing status of surgery at Rochester General Hospital. Traces the evolution of surgical education, leadership, and practice at RGH from mid 1950s to the present. Acknowledges the guidance of Raymond Hinshaw, M.D. under whose leadership the Department made significant advances. Reviews events that led to the affiliation of the Hospital with the U of R and notes steady increases in cardiothoracic surgeries.
  • RAYMOND GRAMIAK, M.D. (Consulting Physician in Diagnostic Ultrasound, 1979-91) /Rob Lerner, M.D.(5/23/1996) Recounts early life and family influences growing up in Philadelphia. Tells how, after attending the University of Rochester Medical School, he decided to become a radiologist. Discusses the evolution of radiology as a specialty. Describes his early work in special techniques, especially in diagnostic ultrasound, an area in which he was a pioneer. Explains some of his contributions to diagnostic ultrasound.
  • JACK LYDA, Ph.D. & URSULA WINTERFELDT (Head of Respiratory Therapy, 1983-) & (Respiratory Therapist, 1965-85) /Joint Interview (12/14/1995) Reviews transformation of Physical Therapy in the 1960s to Respiratory Therapy in the 1990s. Contrasts present with the past in the areas of therapist education, technology, medications, causes and severity of diseases treated, outpatient services, and staffing requirements of the department.
  • WILLIAM HALL, M.D. & DONALD BORDLEY, M.D. (Chief of Medicine, 1985-) & (Medical Director, Emergency Department, 1989-) /Joint Interview (5/23/1996) Two physicians who directed the medical education program for the Department of Medicine for much of the decade of the 1980s discuss the difficulties they encountered during the last years of the independent residency program at RGH and its transition to the University of Rochester Associated Hospitals Program. Includes a nice tribute to L. Spector and humorous anecdotes about resident life.
  • ZYGMUNT TOMKIEWICZ, M.D. (Chief of Pathology and Clinical Laboratories, 1970-) /Paul Weld, M.D. (7/25/1996) Recalls early medical training, especially reasons for changing career plans from obstetrics and gynecology to pathology. Explains in detail influence of Milton Bohrod. Discusses the importance of laboratories in hospitals and reviews the changes which have occurred over the years. Remembers George Bodon with great fondness.
  • THEODORE VAN ZANDT, M.D. (Chief of Radiology, 1961 -1990) /Paul Weld, M.D. (10/10/1996) Details the early history of Radiology, Diagnostic & Nuclear Imaging Department at RGH. Offers a nice tribute to Dr. E. Forrest Merrill, long time chair of the department. Discusses Radiology residency in detail. Reviews his teaching methodology and his many awards. Notes the explosion in technological techniques in recent times.
  • MICHAEL BRANDRISS, M.D. (Section Chief, Infections Diseases, 1974-96) /Paul Weld, M.D. (7/25/1996) Reviews early years doing basic research at the National Institutes of Health. Describes in detail the old Rochester General Hospital, Westside. Recounts the interesting events that led to his appointment as Acting Chief of Medicine three times. Presents a tribute to Dr. Lawrence Young, who started the Affiliated Hospitals Training Program. Discusses clinical research at R.G.H.
  • GORDON POTTER, M.D. (Prosthetist) /Dr. Joseph Geary (1/27/1998) Remembers his youth in Syracuse, including being in a traumatic accident that resulted in a leg amputation. Enrolled in a New York State program in prosthetics. Describes changes and improvements in prostheses over the years. Notes close relationship of orthotics or braces to prosthetics, which his business deals with. Discusses importance of physical therapists.
  • HASSAN RAMANATH, M.D. (Attending in Surgery) /Dr. Paul Weld (3/13/1998) Reviews medical education in India and acceptance as a surgical intern at RGH. Remembers several senior surgeons and staff members. Describes training at Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute and later practice with Dr. John Barnell. Became chair of the Medical Care Evaluation Committee at RGH. Discusses obesity and other health problems.
  • NORMAN LOOMIS, M. D. (Chief RGH Family Practice 1986 -) /Dr. Leo Stornelli (4/30/98) After residency in Brooklyn opened practice in Western NY. Became attending at RGH and Myers Hospital, Sodus. Appreciates camaraderie among all attending physicians at RGH. Traces changes for general practitioners – establishment of residency program at RGH and decline. Discusses effects of HMOs, formation of ViaHealth, and beginning of Family Practice residency program at RGH.
  • LUCILLE HEGGENESS, M.D. & EILEEN PATERSON, M.D. (Attending in Pathology) & (Attending in Radiation Oncology) /Dr. Paul Weld (4/6/1998) Interviewees agree that their specialties were more adaptable for women physicians wishing to combine career with family and other pursuits. Being a woman in medicine is both challenging and an advantage. Credit Dr. Charles Lewis for beginning RGH Cancer Center and the rise of the Department of Radiation Oncology and Diagnostic Radiology. Consultation on unusual and interesting cases is important.
  • BETSY MORSE (Twigs, Association, B-CMA, Volunteer 1948 - ) /Terry Lehr (6/11/1998) After WW II, began volunteering in Premature Baby Nursery. Became active in Ivy Twig. Describes Westside Twig sales and expansion of small Twig shop and addition of Twig café at RGH Northside. Twig projects helped finance the development of the Birthing Center, Senior programs, the Twig Auditorium and the Twig Family Center. Long-term leader of the RGH Women’s Board, RGH Association, and in B-CMA.
  • SUSAN ROSENTHAL, M.D. (Chief of Medical Oncology) /Dr. John Olson (6/11/1998) Education: MD at Harvard Medical School; Medical residency at Beth Israel Hospital; NIH Fellowship in Oncology. Became Chief of RGH Oncology Dept. Witnessed increase in women physicians after 1970s which paralleled increase in female oncology patients. Established close relationship with hematology, radiology under Dr. Van Zandt, radiation therapy under Dr. Lewis, and pathology. Saw growth of MRI and CAT scan technologies. 1980s became Assoc. Dir. U of R oncology training program. Knowledge of chemistry contributed to understanding of anti cancer drugs. Writes and edits in retirement.
  • EDWARD WENTWORTH Jr. (Dentist)
  • FREDERICK HALIK, D.D.S. (Attending in Dentistry) /Dr. Edward Wentworth Jr. (7/2/1998 (a); 8/25/1999 (b)) #86a: Reviews education, especially at Harvard where he majored in biochemistry. Dental practice followed service in World War II. Practiced at RGH; elected president of the Monroe County Dental Society and chairman of the 7th District Ethics Committee. #86b: Reviews life in the Armed Services. Graduated from U of R with post-doctoral study at Columbia U. to train as a periodontist. Practiced at Strong and RGH. Served as an early chief of Dental Service at Strong and forensic odontologist.
  • PHIL MAPLES, B.S., M.A., F.C.M.H. (Archivist, Baker-Cederberg Museum & Archives, 1983 -) /Betsy Morse and Dr. Paul Weld (8/23/1999) Introduced to health care as a child: grandmother was a nurse and mother was an invalid. Earned Bachelors and Masters degrees in history at SUNY Brockport. Served in Air Force during Viet Name era. Joined RGH as member of the Security Department. After serving on Archives Committee 1977 – 83 became part-time archivist. Involved in museum in Arcade, Wyoming County from 1982 to 1992. In 1996 became full-time archivist of B-CMA. Increased regular volunteers to current total of ten. Established historical exhibits and Archives’ awards program. Has gained awards and grants for the archives. Interests: military history, esp. conflicts among recruits.
  • WILLIAM COTANCH, M.D. (Chief, Neurosurgery) /Dr. J. LaRue Wiley (10/18/1999) Describes early life in Fond du Lac, WI, medical school and residency at U of WI., Madison. Spent 2.5 years in U. S. Navy; came to RGH in 1967. Reviews changes in neurosurgery in the past 30 years: quantum leaps in diagnostic imaging – ultrasound, CT scans, MRI. Notes changes in local practice: increased neurologists; Physician’s Assistants replacing medical residents on RGH neurosurgical service. Lumbar disc surgery is presently most common neurosurgical operation. Decries management of medical care by non medical personnel.
  • ANTHONY PIZZARELLI, M.D. (Attending in OBGYN) /Dr. Donald Spratt (1/20/2000) Native of Rochester. Pre med studies at Notre Dame followed by M. D. at R of r. Remembers ambulance duty as an extern and learning about anesthesia. Completed internship and 3-year surgical residency at Ply Clinic Hospital in NYC. Recruited by Dr. Gene Duggan for OB residency at RGH. Networking helped his practice grow; joined practice of Drs. Lange and Durfee. Recalls moving bunk beds and mattress in move from Westside to Norhtside. Discusses use of forceps in obstretrics.
  • SAM TUMINELLI, M.D. (Attending Physician Internal Medicine) /Dr. J. Larue Wiley (10/18/1999) Tenth child of immigrant parents, attended schools in Rochester. Entered Georgetown University Medical School. Served in US Army Air Force. Joined RGH as an intern and resident in internal medicine. Valued colleagues with expertise in immunology, infectious medicine, endocrinology and development of Dept. of Neurology. Challenges in early career included limited armamentarium, few antibiotics and medicines to treat infection and heart disease. Mentions onset of wide scope of the Framingham study. Proud of RGH’s quality of care and its place of respect in the community. Stresses importance of continuing education. Father of five children; in leisure pursues study of history, particularly WWII, astronomy, and cosmology
  • BERNIE TODD-SMITH (Director, ViaHealth Libraries) /Anne Fenstermacher (3/8/2000) Master’s degree in Information Science from North Carolina University. 1974-76 librarian in Miner Library, U of Rochester Medical School. Appointed assistant librarian at RGH. Undertook supervision of Werner Library, enlarged under Gannett grant. Established Circuit Librarian Program in 1982, which brought books, journals, and audiovisual materials to regional hospitals. Named Hospital Librarian of the Year by Medical Library Association in 1995. Surveyed 250 area physicians involved with patient care about their valued resources. Developed Wellness Information Center which has fielded 1600 questions from urban and rural health care consumers.
  • ANNE FENSTERMACHER (Director Volunteer Department) /Betsy Morse (9/18/2000) Born at RGH West Main Street. Father Walter was surgeon associated with Dr. Howard Prince; mother Dorothy was a member of Nightingale Twig. After high school, Anne worked in RGH Medical Records Dept. Graduated U of Wisconsin in 1964. Worked in Consumer Affairs Department, RG & E for 28 years, retiring as its head. Named head of RGH Volunteer Dept. Expanded volunteer recruitment programs to include retired men. Used videotapes of volunteer activities in Cancer, Visitor’s Service, Emergency Dept. Pastoral Care, Wheelchair transport, etc. for recruitment. Concerned with volunteer satisfaction. Developed Surgical Host and Hostess Service for serving families of surgical patients. Established Patient Representatives program, which connects retired nurses with patients. Recognizes need to relieve congestion at patient discharge.
  • ROBERT DALE, M.D. (Pulmonologist) /Dr. David Lee (11/10/2000) Attended medical school at Syracuse. Had two pulmonary fellowships and served two years as Chief of Medicine U. S. Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, NH. From 1975 to 1977 was the only pulmonologist at RGH. Since 1975, intensive or semi-intensive care beds have increased from 10 to 100; inpatients are severely ill. Has noted changes in pulmonary medicine including flexible bronchoscopes and more sophisticated ventilators. Nurses are now trained in ventilator management
  • RICHARD BAYER, M.D. (Director, Chemistry Lab) /Dr. J. LaRue Wiley (9/18/2000) Native of New Jersey; PhD. From Rutgers. Came to RGH as Dir. Of Clinical Biochemistry Lab. in 1972. Lab. Measures components of body fluids and tissues. In 1972 about 600,000 biochemical tests were performed annually; now over 3 million from RGH alone and 6 to 7 million from all ViaHealth organizations. Notes recent progress in speed and accuracy of myocardial infarction diagnoses which give promise of earlier diagnosis of more diseases in the future. Regrets that third party reimbursement led to hospital mergers and closings. Hopes that situation will improve shortly.
  • HARRY METZ, M.D. (Attending in Ophthalmology) /Dr. Gwen Sterns (10/10/2000) Recalls studies at Columbia and medical training at SUNY Downstate. Served residency in ophthalmology at U of R. Became chief of ophthalmology for US Health Service in Norfolk, VA and New Orleans. Returned to U of R as chief of ophthalmology and later entered private practice. Discusses growth of department at U of R at RGH. Joined RGH’s ophthalmology department, specializing in pediatric and strabismus ophthalmology. MBA studies led to involvement on General, Genesee, and ViaHealth Boards.
  • GWEN STERNS, M.D. (Chief, Dept. of Ophthalmology) /Dr. Henry Metz (10/10/2000) Remembers M. D. training at Women’s Medical College and interning at Presbyterian Hospital, U of Pennsylvania. Served residency in ophthalmology at Columbia Presbyterian Eye Institute and later specialized in ultrasonography of the eye and orbit. Has a special interest in Lighthouse program in Rochester. Discusses growth of the adult and pediatric ophthalmology department at RGH. Technical and surgical advancements have created a need for subspecialties like glaucoma. Notes the advantage of having a hospital-based specialty that allows consultation on patients who have other medical problems.
  • MEHDI SHEMERANI, M.D. & PAUL LORTIE, M. D. (Attendings in Surgery) /William Africano, M. D. (11/30/2000)Dr. Shemirani describes his early life in Tehran, Iran. Dr. Lortie tells about his youth in Ontario, Canada. Both discuss their medical school experiences. They remember their early experiences at RGH and St. Mary’s Hospitals, especially relating to emergency cases. The affiliation with Strong Memorial Hospital is discussed.
  • JOHN CONDEMI, M.D. (Attending, Internal Medicine) /Dr. William Africano (10/30/2000)Recalls early life in NYC and studies at Albany Medical College. Interned at RGH under tutelage of Drs. Weld and Lipman. Specialty training at Lahey Clinic led to specialization in allergies, asthma, and immunology. Involved in grant-funded drug research at U of R where he became director of the department. Despite entering private practice, still has extensive publications, conference presentations, and lectures that attest to his expertise in the field.
  • EARL LIPMAN, M.D. (Attending in Medicine) /Joseph Geary, M. D. (1/16/2001) Remembers early years as a student in Rochester. Describes premedical and medical education. Describes his internship at The Genesee Hospital. Reminisces about the library at Westside. Details his work as Director of Medical Education. Discusses RGH’s affiliation with the U of R.
  • AUSTIN LEVE, M.D. (Attending, Orthopedics) /J. LaRue Wiley, M. D. (1/24/2001)Reminisces about Harold Leve, his father, and Plato Schwarz, who was chair of orthopedics at RGH. Mentions early chiefs of orthopedic surgery. Discusses early treatment of hip fractures. Refers to Lou Goldstein, a specialist in triple arthrodeses. Relates how arthroscopic exams were performed. Reviews rising medical costs and changing methods of payment.
  • JOSEPH PLUKAS, M.D. (Attending in OB/GYN) /J. LaRue Wiley, M. D. (2/23/2001) Recalls early life as son of a physician. Did undergraduate studies at Fordham. Attended medical school at NYU, interned at Hartford Hospital. Served in U. S. Navy 1955-1957 followed by residency in OB/GYN at RGH. Reviews changes in obstetrics since 1957: light sedation during labor and delivery with increased participation of mother, shorter hospital stays, forceps deliveries fewer but more Caesarean sections to avoid malpractice suits.
  • LINDA FITZ (Administrator, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ViaHealth) Video /Joshua Hollander, MD (1/31/2001) Reviews choice of career – between pharmacy and physical therapy. After high school at Newark-Wayne, came to RGH in 1979. Worked under Dr. Paul Weld and Sharon McHugh. Remembers weekly visits, 1979 to 1987, of Drs. Ellis and Cyriax to promote manipulative treatment similar to chiropractic. Describes massive expansion of Physical Medicine program in the 1990s and division into in- and outpatient areas, and institution of work hardening program for workers comp cases. Became de facto director of the department. Assumed the position at General and The Genesee Hospitals along with 3 satellite units in 1999.
  • ERIC NIELSEN, M.D. (Executive Director of GRIPA) /J. LaRue Wiley, M. D. (2/28/2001) Recounts early life. Received undergraduate and medical education at U of R. Served 3rd year training at RGH and continued on in internship and residency. Describes cordial relationships between full-time faculty, private physicians, and house staff. Recalls changes in medicine over the past 30 years: medical treatment for peptic ulcers, early mobilization of heart patients, coronary artery bypass surgery, angioplasty, improved renal dialysis, introduction of diagnostic ultrasound, and other advances. Discusses unfavorable economic changes – emphasis now on economic issues.
  • FLORENCE DOYLE (Head of Purchasing) /Deb Zimmerman (4/5/2001) Began association with RGH as a secretary while attending college. After graduation advanced through purchasing agent, manager in Central Stores, Director of Perioperative Finance. 1995 became Director of Materials Management and Associate Director of Materials Management for ViaHealth. Credited with smooth transition from hand count/paper-pencil management to computerized ordering. Teamed with clinicians and physicians. Left ViaHealth in 2001 to become Director of Materials Management at Mayo Clinic.
  • EASTER TUCKER, R.N. (Vice President, Nursing) /Nina Morris (6/5/2001) Received high school and community college education in Western New York; went on to Albany Medical Center for R. N. graduate degree. Worked first in Strong’s emergency department where she made technical improvements for nurses. Rose to Assistant Director of Nursing at RGH in 1981 after earning a B. S. in Education at U of R. Developed Quarterly Assurance Report at RGH. Cites severe nursing shortage in 1980s when the new medical wing was added; able to obtain 40 LPNs with administrative assistance. Discusses problems of African-American nurses and patients; advocates gradual promotion of diversity.
  • ROBERT LERNER, M. D. (Attending in Radiology) /Dan Jacobson (10/29/2002) A native of Ohio, began as an electrical engineer, researching for General Motors. Entered PhD program in electrical engineering at U of R where he was exposed to radiology, graduated and became a resident in radiology at RGH. Became Director of MRI Department at Strong. Moved to private practice at RGH in 1990. Pioneered renal artery doppler and prostate ultrasounds, transrectal ultrasound for cancer staging; collaborated in development of sonelasticity, remote palpitation. Praises RGHs leadership in bringing CAT scan to Rochester.
  • LINDA MCKENNA, R.N. (Nursing Education) /Diane Huss, R. N. (1/16/2002) Began nursing practice in rural hospitals in surgery, medicine, and maternity. Moved to Rochester in 1965 and worked part time in OR. Became Clinical Instructor at TGH School of Nursing, then returned to RGH as educator. Chaired Procedures Committee, instituted programs, including “Yes You,” to enable nurses to meet all requirements. Established Orientations for nursing assistants, unit techs and secretaries could gain competencies. Chaired Protocol Committee and oversaw placement of protocols on the CCS system.
  • LORRAINE CLARK (Former President RGH Association) /Betsy Morse (1/16/2002)Began volunteering in RGH coffee shop in 1960. Moved to X-Ray Department. Has acted as Surgical Hostess, which involves acting as liaison between Operating Room and Recovery Room and families, since 1964. Found first two volunteer buyers for Twig Gift Shop. Elected to RGH Association Board in 1974 and served as president in 1985 and 1986. Served as chair of Twig Shop, and Allocations, Volunteer Services, and Interior Design committees. Organizes Christmas delivery of poinsettia plants to all patients on Christmas Eve.
  • JOSHUA HOLLANDER, M.D.(Chief, Neurology) /Jerry Honch (3/14/2002) Medical training at Columbia University; residency at Vanderbuilt Hospital where he worked under national figures in neurology. Continued working with neurology scientists at Mass. General. After a short term with U. S. Public Health Service and another in Michigan, came to RGH in 1969 as a neurologist. During his tenure the Neurology Department became very active in training medical students. Developed a vascular diagnostic lab and an active stroke unit, obtained apnea monitors, CT scans and MRI.
  • BARB COSTELLO (Physical Therapist) /Bonnie Servas (1/30/2002) Began work at RGH in Physical Medicine, rehabilitation. Received training in ultrasound, including reading echoencephalograms and obstetrical, abdominal , eye, and cardiac echoes. As RGH’s first sonographer, a pioneer in the technology, she trained many medical residents. Discusses many changes in technology in her 38 years at RGH and establishment of the Ultrasound Department.
  • STAN DOUGLAS (President, RGH Foundation) /Christine DiVeronica (3/18/2002) Native of PA. After service in Korean War attended radio broadcasting school in Boston. Began as staff announcer in Vermont and later in Elmira. Changed careers to PR at St. Joseph’s Hospital where he learned how to get foundation grants to rebuild after flood caused by hurricane Agnes. At daughters’ urging applied for position as Foundation Director at RGH. Garnered funding from large local industries; led drive for the Hinshaw Education Center. Continues to volunteer at RGH after retirement in 1996.
  • RICHARD STERNS, M.D. (Chief of Medicine) /Richard Gangemi (3/26/2002) Trained at U of Pennsylvania. Began internship and residency at U California, San Francisco, and completed it at Einstein in New York City. Focused on hyponatremia on arrival at RGH. Accepted chair of department at the beginning of tumultuous period for health care in Rochester. Has grown to like the challenges and politics of administrative and academic medicine. Proud of his contributions toward keeping together fulltime academic medical group through rift with U of R, merger and closing of The Genesee Hospital. Wants to be remembered as a good teacher and acting as a role model for his students.
  • PATRICIA BOMBA, M.D. (Attending in Medicine) /Dr. Linda Rice (1/30/04) Recalls early life as first in family to attend college, in home state of Pennsylvania; medical school at U of Virginia. Residency experience - rotated through all city hospitals in Rochester in “associated hospital program.” Discusses Rochester Area Hospital Corp. (RAHC) which grew out of a conference on geriatrics. Drs. Bomba and Rice established the first all-women practice in Rochester and were the first women to be invited to the RGH Medical Board. Reviews evolution of RGH into ViaHealth. Emphasizes need for senior health services and palliative care and combating abuse of the elderly. Mentions challenge of balancing career and family.
  • MARY GOOLEY, R.N. (Head, Hemophelia Center) /Dr. John Olson (1/30/2003) Early studies in medical technology at U Michigan. Recalls helping establish Hemophilia Center at Westside in 1959 which evolved into the National Hemophilia Foundation. Reviews changing treatments that have improved lifestyle of patients. Recalls 1984 crisis when blood supplies tainted by HIV/Aids virus. Continues service on the N H F Board, traveling to develop new chapters. Describes new diseases affecting hemophiliacs.
  • JERRY INTERLICCHIA, R.N. (Administrative Clinical Leader) /Phil Maples (3/17/2003) Recounts early service as technician followed by R. N. degree at MCC and board certification in nephrology. Discusses changes dialysis, nursing, and medical care during the last 30 years, particularly technological advances in dialysis machine allowing move of treatment from hospital to home. Reviews recent nursing shortages and problems of nursing specialization, including attempts to unionize nurses.
  • KEN DAVIDSON, M.D. (Attending in Cardiology) /Anthony Fedullo (5/21/2003) Description of early life includes inspiration for medical interest. Discusses educational background as well as medical internship at Roosevelt Hospital and residencies at Boston City Hospital and Tufts New England Medical Center. Was drafted into military service and stationed at Ft. McPherson Army Hospital (Atlanta, Ga.) during Vietnam War. Joined RGH cardiology staff in 1976. Started performing angioplasties in 1982 in order to prevent bypass surgeries and prolong patients’ lives. Notes increase in nurse practitioners as well as advances in echocardiograms. Has a strong interest in education and has worked a great deal with residents.
  • ROBERT EASLEY, M.D. (Attending in Cardiology) /Richard Gangem (5/21/2003) Discussed undergrad education at U of R, medical school in Albany and medical internship and residency at TGH. Founder of Rochester Cardiopulmonary Group with Prakash Pande and two others ca. 1976. Reviews changes in medicine over past thirty-five years including high-tech diagnostic procedures, refinement of surgical treatment of heart disease and diminished skills of physicians in physical diagnosis. Involved in critical care nursing education in early 1970s, cardiac rehabilitation and cardiac catheterization labs and associated interventional cardiology in the late 1980s.
  • JOHN BOSCO, M.D. (Associate Chief of Pediatrics) /Dr. Dalberth (5/21/2003) Early life and education discussed. Military service in an Army hospital in Germany during the Korean War spurred his interest in medicine. Began practice at RGH in 1966 with Dr. Joe Incavo and later with Drs. Branch, Holmes and Davis. Worked in pediatric clinics at both locations of Rochester General and was Associate Chief of Pediatrics at one time. Very active in the community, is a member and past President of the Rochester Pediatrics Society; is currently a member of the Utility Management Committee at RGH. Family has been active as volunteers at RGH and in the Medical Society and Twigs.
  • THELMA & GEORGE HAIZLIP (RGH Association Board/RGH Board of Directors) Betsy Morse (12/10/2003) Thelma Haizlip elected to Association Board in 1993. Served as Corresponding Secretary, Chair of the Nursing Committee; member of the Social Work Committee. Volunteers as Surgical Hostess, acting as liaison between surgical staff and families of patients. Monitors proceeds from vending machines which help support hospital projects. George Haizlip joined RGH Board of Directors in 1975. Acted as Secretary of the Board and Chair of House and Grounds Committee, working with contractors on new construction. Served on several committees. Together the Haizlips are members of the Patient/Staff/Physician Satisfaction Committee and interview patients in the MICU. Both have high praise for RGHA and its contributions to the hospital.
  • MARIE HANSON MILLER (Former President RGHA) /Betsy Morse (12/10/2003) Joined RGHA Board in 1960, when it was still known as the Women’s Board. Served on several committees and elected President of RGHA Board. In late 1960s was invited to join the hospital’s Board of Directors and served for many years. Always interested in volunteers visiting patients and in improving patient life. Acted as head of volunteers at the Mental Health Center. A member of her family carries on her interest in hospitals by testing newborns for hearing problems.
  • LAURA VON DOENHOFF (Attending Physician – Medicine) /William Henion Laura’s early life and family reviewed. Her interest and training in cardiology and especially ultrasound reviewed. Her interest in the library explained. Reviewed her graduate work in chemistry.