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Tinidazole

pronounced as(tye ni' da zole)

IMPORTANT WARNING:

Another medication that is similar to tinidazole has caused cancer in laboratory animals. It is not known whether tinidazole increases the risk of developing cancer in laboratory animals or in humans.Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Why is this medication prescribed?

Tinidazole is used to treat trichomoniasis (a sexually transmitted disease that can affect men and women), giardiasis (an infection of the intestine that can cause diarrhea, gas, and stomach cramps), and amebiasis (an infection of the intestine that can cause diarrhea, gas, and stomach cramps and can spread to other organs such as the liver). Tinidazole is in a class of medications called antiprotozoal agents. It works by killing the organisms that can cause infection.

How should this medicine be used?

Tinidazole comes as a suspension (liquid) prepared by the pharmacist and a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken with food as a single dose or once a day for 3 to 5 days. To help you remember to take tinidazole (if you are to take it for more than one day), take it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take tinidazole exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Shake the liquid well before each use to mix the medication evenly.

Take tinidazole until you finish the prescription, even if you feel better. If you stop taking tinidazole too soon or skip doses, your infection may not be completely cured and bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics

Other uses for this medicine

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This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

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Before taking tinidazole,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to tinidazole, metronidazole (Flagyl), or any other medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking. Be sure to mention any of the following: anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin); antifungals such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), and ketoconazole (Nizoral); carbamazepine (Tegretol); cimetidine (Tagamet); clarithromycin (Biaxin); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); danazol (Danocrine); delavirdine (Rescriptor); dexamethasone (Decadron); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor; Tiazac); erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin); ethosuximide (Zarontin); fluorouracil (Adrucil ); fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem); fluvoxamine (Luvox); fosphenytoin (Cerebyx); HIV protease inhibitors such as indinavir (Crixivan) and ritonavir (Norvir); isoniazid (INH, Nydrazid); lithium (Lithobid); metronidazole (Flagyl); nefazodone (Serzone); oral contraceptives (birth control pills); oxytetracycline (Terramycin); phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); phenytoin (Dilantin); rifabutin (Mycobutin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); tacrolimus (Prograf); troglitazone (Rezulin); troleandomycin (TAO); verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); and zafirlukast (Accolate). Also tell your doctor if you are taking disulfiram (Antabuse) or have stopped taking it within the past 2 weeks. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • if you are taking cholestyramine (Questran), you should not take it at the same time that you take tinidazole. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how to space doses of these medications.
  • tell your doctor if you have a yeast infection now; if you are being treated with dialysis (mechanical removal of waste in patients with kidney failure); or if you have or have ever had seizures or nervous system, blood, or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. If you become pregnant while taking tinidazole, call your doctor. Do not breastfeed while you are taking tinidazole and for 3 days after you finish your treatment.
  • know that you should not drink alcohol while you are taking this medication and for 3 days afterwards. Alcohol may cause an upset stomach, vomiting, stomach cramps, headaches, sweating, and flushing (redness of the face).

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

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Talk to your doctor about drinking grapefruit juice while taking this medication.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

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Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

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Tinidazole may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • sharp, unpleasant metallic taste

  • upset stomach

  • vomiting

  • loss of appetite

  • constipation

  • stomach pain or cramps

  • headache

  • tiredness or weakness

  • dizziness

Some side effects can be serious. The following symptoms are uncommon, but if you experience any of them, call your doctor immediately:

  • seizures

  • numbness or tingling of hands or feet

  • rash

  • hives

  • swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs

  • hoarseness

  • difficulty swallowing or breathing

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

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Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Protect the medication from light. Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Throw away any remaining liquid after 7 days. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of emergency/overdose

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In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What other information should I know?

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Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to tinidazole. Before having any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are taking tinidazole.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Your prescription is probably not refillable. If you still have symptoms of infection after you finish the tinidazole, call your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Brand names

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  • Tindamax®

Last Reviewed - 09/01/2010

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AHFS® Consumer Medication Information. © Copyright, 2014. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland. All Rights Reserved. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized by ASHP.