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NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine, Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health

Helping the Library Reach Out to the Future

Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg500 New York City science students.NLM Deputy Director Dr. Donald West King and Dr. Henry W. Foster

Encouraging future medical researchers: (l-r) NLM Director Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg explaining a medical exhibit; some of the 500 New York City science students attending the NLM outreach day; NLM Deputy Director Dr. Donald West King and Dr. Henry W. Foster discussing the day's activities.
Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NLM


On behalf of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM), welcome to the Fall 2007 issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine. We take pride in bringing you the most up-to-date and trustworthy information you need to keep you and your family healthy. In the pages that follow, you'll find the latest advice and research findings direct from the scientists and medical experts who work for you at the world's leading medical and health research organization, the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The FNLM is also working to promote and expand the availability of other terrific work carried out by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to improve the health of Americans. One such program is helping to recruit the next generation of top medical researchers.

Earlier this year, thanks to the Library, 500 New York City high school science students spent the day with some of the nation's top scientists and medical doctors, learning about the latest advances in research on organ transplants. Afterwards, the students asked questions and explored exhibits featuring artificial body parts and recent examples of medical breakthroughs. They saw and touched heart stents, pacemakers, oxygenators (old and new), a coronary artery bypass graft, and hearing aids (old and new). For these kids, it was an experience they won't soon forget. This session at New York University School of Medicine was part of a series of presentations sponsored by the Library across the nation. They are aimed at getting young people excited about careers in medical research.

One of these school children could be the one to find a cure for cancer or make a similar contribution to our nation's health. That is why we need your help to bring programs like this to thousands of additional school children across America. To join us in this effort, contact FNLM at the address below—and help the Friends support the greatest medical library in the world.

Sincerely,
Paul G. Rogers, Chairman
Friends of the National Library of Medicine

Fall 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 4 Page Inside Cover