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Breathing Easier

Tips to Help Parents Manage Their Child's Asthma Every Day

Asthma Action Plan

Asthma Action Plan

Use this plan, together with your doctor, to write down how to manage your child's asthma, routinely on a daily basis and during an attack. This Asthma Action Plan can also be ordered from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: http://catalog.nhlbi.nih.gov/catalog/facet/Diseases-and-Conditions/term/Asthma

There are six steps that can help control asthma:

  • Use inhaled corticosteroids if your child has persistent asthma (for example, symptoms more than 2 days a week). Your health provider will help you choose the best treatment for your child's asthma.
  • Use a written action plan to tell your child and your child's caregivers two things: 1) what to do daily to control your asthma, and 2) how to handle symptoms or asthma attacks and when to get medical attention
  • Work with your doctor to assess asthma severity during the first visit to determine what treatment is needed to get your child's asthma under control
  • Assess and monitor how well your child's asthma is controlled at all follow-up visits. The doctor may need to increase your child's medicine to keep his or her asthma under control, or may be able to decrease his or her medicine.
  • Schedule follow-up visits ("asthma check-ups") with your child's doctor at regular times, at least every 6 months.
  • Work with your healthcare provider to identify allergens or irritants that make your child's asthma worse, and learn how to avoid them. If needed, use a treatment plan that helps your child participate actively in physical activities and exercise.
Read More "Breathing Easier" Articles

Breathing Easier / What is Asthma? / Asthma and Schools / Asthma and Health Disparities / Tips to Help Parents Manage Their Child's Asthma Every Day

Fall 2013 Issue: Volume 8 Number 3 Page 16