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Feature:
Understanding ADHD

Causes of ADHD

Scientists are not sure what causes ADHD, although many studies suggest that genes play a large role. Like many other illnesses, ADHD probably results from a combination of factors. In addition to genetics, researchers are looking at possible environmental factors. They are also studying how brain injuries, nutrition, and the social environment might contribute to ADHD.

Genes.

Inherited from our parents, genes are the "blueprints" for who we are. Results from several international studies of twins show that ADHD often runs in families. Researchers are looking at several genes that may make people more likely to develop the disorder.

Environmental factors.

Studies suggest a potential link between a pregnant woman's cigarette smoking and alcohol use during pregnancy and ADHD in children. In addition, preschoolers who are exposed to high levels of lead, which can sometimes be found in plumbing fixtures or paint in old buildings, have a higher risk of developing ADHD.

Brain injuries.

Children who have suffered a brain injury may show some behaviors similar to those of ADHD. However, only a small percentage of children with ADHD have suffered a traumatic brain injury.

Sugar.

The idea that refined sugar causes ADHD or makes symptoms worse is popular, but more research discounts this theory than supports it.



Diagnosing ADHD

Children mature at different rates and have different personalities, temperaments, and energy levels. Most children get distracted, act impulsively, and struggle to concentrate at one time or another. Sometimes, these normal factors may be mistaken for ADHD.

ADHD symptoms usually appear early in life, often between the ages of 3 and 6. Since symptoms vary from person to person, the disorder can be hard to diagnose. Parents may first notice that their child loses interest in things sooner than other children, or seems constantly "unfocused" or "out of control." Often, teachers notice the symptoms first, when a child has trouble following rules, or frequently "spaces out" in the classroom or on the playground.

No single test can diagnose a child as having ADHD. Instead, a licensed health professional needs to gather information about the child and his or her behavior and environment.



Brain Imaging Studies Reveal Clues to ADHD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood brain disorders and can continue through adolescence and adulthood. Symptoms include difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and hyperactivity (over-activity). These symptoms can make it difficult for a child with ADHD to succeed in school, get along with other children or adults, or finish tasks at home.

Brain imaging studies have revealed that, in youths with ADHD, the brain matures in a normal pattern but is delayed, on average, by about three years. The delay is most pronounced in brain regions involved in thinking, paying attention, and planning. More recent studies have found that the outermost layer of the brain, the cortex, shows delayed maturity overall. Studies also reveal that brain structure important for proper communications between the two halves of the brain shows an abnormal growth pattern. These delays and abnormalities may underlie the hallmark symptoms of ADHD and help to explain how the disorder may develop.

Treatments can relieve many symptoms of ADHD, but there is currently no cure for the disorder. With treatment, most people with ADHD can be successful in school and lead productive lives. Researchers are developing more effective treatments and interventions, and using new tools such as brain imaging, to better understand ADHD and to find more effective ways to treat and prevent it.

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) lead agency in the research on ADHD.

fastfacts
1
Treatments include medication, various types of psychotherapy, education and training, or a combination of treatments.
2
ADHD currently has no cure, but there are effective treatments for both children and adults with ADHD.
3
Costs associated with childhood ADHD have been conservatively estimated at $38 billion or more, annually, states the CDC.
4
About 1 in 10 children in the United States, 4-17 years of age, have been diagnosed with ADHD, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Read More "Understanding ADHD" Articles

Causes of ADHD / Symptoms In Children / Treating ADHD / Adults with ADHD

Spring 2014 Issue: Volume 9 Number 1 Page 15-16