Skip Navigation Bar
NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine, Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health

Healthlines

EatPlayGrow™

EatPlayGrow™: Creative Activities for a Healthy Start is a health curriculum for families with children 2 to 5 years old. It was developed through a partnership between the National Institutes of Health and the Children's Museum of Manhattan.
Photo courtesy of Children's Museum of Manhattan

EatPlayGrow™: Helping Families Create Healthier Futures

A new, science-based health education program offers fun and easy ways to teach young children healthy habits.

EatPlayGrow™: Creative Activities for a Healthy Start is a health curriculum for families with children 2 to 5 years old. Lessons use art, storytelling, music, and dance to teach kids about healthy eating and getting enough physical activity and sleep. Childcare providers, community and faith-based leaders, librarians, etc.—anyone interested in working with young children—can teach parents, caregivers, and children using the lessons.

EatPlayGrow was developed through a partnership between the National Institutes of Health and the Children's Museum of Manhattan.

EatPlayGrow was adapted from NIH's We Can!® Energize Our Families curriculum, which was originally designed to teach parents/caregivers of children ages 8 to 13 years old how to help their children stay at a healthy weight. EatPlayGrow and We Can! materials are available for free at www.nih.gov/wecan.

NIH Diets Get High Marks

Two NIH diets top the 2014 Best Diets Best Diets Overall list produced by U.S. News and World Report. The news organization enlisted the help of health experts to evaluate 32 diets. DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) earned best overall diet for the fourth straight year. The TLC (Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes) diet captured the number two spot, for the second year. To be top-rated, according to U.S News,"a diet had to be relatively easy to follow, nutritious, safe and effective for weight loss and against diabetes and heart disease." Both diets can result in weight loss if calories are reduced.

DASH is a flexible and balanced eating plan that's shown to lower blood pressure and blood cholesterol. TLC is designed to reduce blood cholesterol by combining diet, physical activity, and weight management. In addition to best overall, DASH and TLC also ranked first and second as the "Best Diets For Healthy Eating" and DASH tied for first among Best Diabetes Diets.

NIH's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute developed both DASH and TLC. To learn more about the plans visit: DASH Health Topic: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/dash/ and Your Guide to Lowering Cholesterol with Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC): www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/chol/chol_tlc.htm

Keep Your Eyes on the Road: The Dangers of Distracted Driving

Drivers are doing something else—like eating or texting—about 10 percent of the time they're behind the wheel. The distractions are particularly dangerous for new, teenaged drivers. That's according to a recent study in which participants agreed to have cameras and sensors installed in their cars for observation.

Compared to when they were focused solely on the road, new drivers were eight times more likely to crash or nearly crash while dialing a cell phone; almost four times more likely when texting; and three times more likely when eating. For experienced drivers, only dialing a cell phone was associated with an increased risk.

"Anything that takes a driver's eyes off the road can be dangerous," says Bruce Simons-Morton, EdD, MPH, a study co-author. "But our study shows these distracting practices are especially risky for novice drivers, who haven't developed sound safety judgment behind the wheel." Simons-Morton is a researcher with NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He collaborated with researchers from Virginia Tech.

Spring 2014 Issue: Volume 9 Number 1 Page 28