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NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine, Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health

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Your P.A.D. Checklist

Together, you and your health care professional can form a plan to keep your cholesterol within limits and reduce your risk of peripheral arterial disease (P.A.D.). That can start by making sure you "know your numbers" related to cholesterol, blood glucose, and blood pressure. Your health care professional will help with that and can use the ankle-bracial index (ABI) test to assist, as well.

TOTAL CHOLESTEROL

Desirable: less than 200 mg/dL
Borderline High: 200 – 239 mg/dL
High: 240 mg/dL and above

TOTAL CHOLESTEROL Date

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HDL CHOLESTEROL

HDL cholesterol less than 40 mg/dL is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

HDL CHOLESTEROL Date

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LDL CHOLESTEROL

Optimal: less than 100 mg/dL
Near Optimal: 100 –129 mg/dL
Borderline High: 130 –159 mg/dL
High: 160 –189 mg/dL
Very High: 190 mg/dL and above

LDL CHOLESTEROL Date

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BLOOD GLUCOSE (fasting)

Normal: 99 mg/dL and below
Prediabetes: 100 –125 mg/dL
Diabetes: 126 mg/dL and above

BLOOD GLUCOSE Date

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BLOOD PRESSURE

Normal: less than 120/80 mmHg
Prehypertension: 120/80 to 139/89 mmHg
Hypertension: 140/90 mmHg or higher

BLOOD PRESSURE Date

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ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX (ABI)

A test that compares the blood pressure readings in your ankles and arms to help determine whether you have P.A.D.
Normal: 1.0 –1.3
Possible P.A.D.: 0.91 –.99 or greater than 1.3
P.A.D.: 0.90 or less

ABI                            Date

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Read More "Could Peripheral Arterial Disease Be Your Problem?" Articles
It Hurts When I Walk! / Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer / Treating P.A.D. / Other Causes of Leg Pain / Prevent P.A.D.: Know Your Numbers / Your P.A.D. Checklist

Summer 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 3 Page 23