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1.
Title: A storm, a strife
Date: 1969
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Department of Medicine and Religion, American Medical Association; Centron Corporation
Abstract: This film dramatizes marital, health, and childrearing challenges in a mid-century American family. The father, Richard, works long hours and has recently remarried after his first wife's death. His teenage daughter has a contentious relationship with her stepmother, Trish, who is having symptoms of illness and is diagnosed with Addison's disease, which she prefers to keep from the family. Trish sees her minister to discuss family problems, and also mentions her health issues. Eventually the minister and family doctor meet with one another in order to discuss the situation and attempt to treat the whole person, and whole family. The film emphasizes connections between emotional and physical well-being.
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2.
Title: Abortive behavior as an alternative for the neurotic attack in the rat
Date: 1939
Run Time: 14 min.
Names: Maier, Norman R. F.; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows experiments on rats demonstrating that a lack of an alternative response when facing a negative situation causes neurotic behavior, and that given an alternative in a negative situation, rats choose the alternative rather than exhibiting neurotic behavior. Testing apparati include an enclosed jumping box in front of a screen containing stimulus cards, a cold air hose, and an enclosed net.
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3.
Title: Activity for schizophrenia
Date: 1951
Run Time: 24 min.
Names: U.S. Veterans Administration, Dept. of Medicine and Surgery; United World Films
Abstract: The film shows concepts of activity applicable to needs of schizophrenic patients, including how therapists, guided by psychiatrists, are able to establish interpersonal relationships through physical activities. The patient's symptoms are refusal to eat, suicide attempts, violence against his father, and peculiar mannerisms. Treatment includes: electroshock, light-to-complex physical therapy, psychotherapy treatment, and occupational therapy. Shots include: mental hospital patient lounge, exercise rooms, oil painting and occupational therapy classes; outdoor exercises such as basketball, swimming, boxing, rowing, and cycling machines; staff meetings, close-up shots of electronarcosis electroshock machine, and a patient trying to ram his head against wall.
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4.
Title: Acute schizophrenic episode
Date: 1969
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample," or televised segment, consists of excerpts from two psychiatric interviews, held within a period of five days between a psychiatrist and a patient in an acute schizophrenic episode. The case illustrated in this segment is a young married female who demonstrates regressive behavior, feelings of rejection, and unmet dependency needs. In the first interview session, she describes the confusion of her home life, mentioning disagreements with her parents. In the second interview, there is considerable improvement in her appearance and behavior. She describes her understanding of her problems, stating that a "door has opened."
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5.
Title: Acute schizophrenic episode: differential diagnosis: migraine, neutropenia, secondary to unknown drugs
Date: 1969
Run Time: 15 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This program contains televised excerpts or "telexamples" of several psychiatric interview sessions over a period of two months. The patient is a young male who is a professional musician. In the initial interview he shows thinking patterns typical of schizophrenia, as seen by his ambivalence and misinterpretation of reality. The patient also describes a continual state of depression. In the second interview, four days later, the patient states that he is insecure and has "no confidence." In the interview session eight days later, he shows some improvement by expressing that he has gained confidence in his profession to the extent that now he would like to "head his own music shop." In the final interview session one month later, the patient again shows schizophrenic behavior manifested by his expressions of insecurity and descriptions of anger followed by depression without guilt.
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6.
Title: Acute undifferentiated schizophrenia
Date: 1969
Run Time: 16 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" or televised interview consists of excerpts from two interviews between a psychiatrist and a schizophrenic patient. The patient shown in these excerpts is an acutely disturbed young male who expresses extreme anger and suspiciousness both verbally and physically. In the first segment, he describes suicide attempts and his confused feelings about his behavior. In the second interview, the patient admits that he might be mentally ill, but states that "everyone is mentally ill to some degree." There is no noticeable improvement in behavior during the second interview.
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7.
Title: Adjustment reaction of adolescence
Date: 1969
Run Time: 58 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This tape is a series of live interviews with seven patients before and after undergoing psychiatric treatment. The first patient, a middle-aged white woman, is being treated for addiction to barbiturates. The second patient, a young white woman, is being treated for suicide and depression. The third patient, a middle-aged white woman, is being treated for hysterical neurosis. The fourth patient, a white male teenager, is being treated for psychotic depressive reaction, and for suicide and anger. The fifth patient, a white male teenager, is suffering from schizophrenic reaction to homosexuality. The sixth patient, a young African-American woman, is suffering from acute schizophrenic reaction and nervousness. The seventh patient, a young white male, is suffering from acute, undifferentiated schizophrenia. He believes he is damned from an unknown disease, wants to annihilate the world, and does not want to stay for treatment.
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8.
Title: Adjustment reaction of adolescence
Date: 1969
Run Time: 9 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" consists of excerpts from a fifteen-minute intake interview with a patient displaying an adjustment reaction to adolescence. The case presented is that of a depressed young woman with somatic symptoms due to a stressful situation with her family and boyfriend. She illustrates depressive behavior, mentioning frequent headaches as a result of the emotional strain. The girl had been having these feelings for approximately one year and was brought to the psychiatric hospital as a result of an hysterical reaction.
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9.
Title: Adjustment reaction of adolescence
Date: 1969
Run Time: 4 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" or televised interview consists of excerpts from an intake interview with a hospitalized psychiatric patient. The case shown is an adolescent girl with depression due to family conflicts over her social activities. She exhibits anger and some acting-out behavior during the course of the interview. Through this session, the young girl is able to verbalize her anxieties and frustration with home and school difficulties.
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10.
Title: Adjustment reaction of adolescence: differential diagnosis: psychotic depressive reaction
Date: 1969
Run Time: 6 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation consists of "telexample" excerpts from a nine-minute psychiatric interview session with a patient displaying an adjustment reaction to adolescence. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the characteristic behavior found in an adjustment reaction. The patient is an angry teenager who shows an inability to express this anger except through acting-out behavior. He describes frustrations with his parents and girlfriend as part of the problem in his adjustment. During the discussion, he explains his suicide attempt as a solution to depression and anger. The differential diagnosis for this case includes a psychotic depressive reaction.
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11.
Title: Age of anxiety
Date: 1962
Run Time: 26 min.
Names: Menninger, Karl A.; Menninger, William Claire; Columbia Broadcasting System
Abstract: This film describes changes that have occurred in the past 100 years in the care and treatment of the mentally ill in the United States. It includes interviews with Drs. Karl and William Menninger and Walter Cronkite, photographs, scenes at the Menninger Clinic and Kansas State Hospital, and simulated dramatizations to illustrate various aspects of the treatment program at the Foundation and Clinic. In part one, the old methods of isolating and punishing mentally ill patients in overcrowded, understaffed institutions are described. The efforts of physicians prominent in the early field of psychiatry are briefly reviewed. Drs. Karl and William Menninger then describe their more progressive approach. At present they have obtained a release rate of 70 percent of patients within 90 days, and an overall release rate of 85 percent. They discuss mental health, mental illness, juvenile delinquency, and criminal justice. In part two, Drs. Karl and William Menninger describe their treatment program for the mentally ill and a training program for psychiatrists and parapsychiatric staff members. A clinical conference is presented and milieu therapy is described.
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12.
Title: Alcohol as a preventative of experimental neuroses
Date: 1945
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: Masserman, Jules Hymen; Jacques, Mary Grier; University of Chicago, Division of Psychiatry; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: In a study designed to investigate whether alcoholic intoxication can protect normal animals from developing neuroses as a result of conflict-causing experiences, cats are trained to open a food box at a bell and light signal. Then they are trained to operate an electric switch to get their own signals and food rewards and to pass barriers and work the switch in any position. Normal animals readily enter the box and show no fear of the switch, signals, food, or barriers. However, feeding inhibitions are immediately induced if the animal receives a shock or an air-blast at the moment it takes the food. To ascertain whether mild alcoholic intoxication during the experimental conflict can protect a normal animal from developing a neurosis, cats were deprived of water for 48 to 96 hours, then given milk containing 5 percent ethyl spirit. Upon exposure to the previously fear-producing stimuli, their reactions to the milder shocks and blasts showed more curiosity than fear. With stronger shocks and blasts, mild phobic reactions lasting only several hours were noted. However, control animals retained their neurotic symptoms. When subjected to corresponding traumata when they were sober, the experimental "drunk" cats developed the same kinds of phobic reactions as the control animals. The film concludes that alcohol acts as a partial protection against experimentally-induced motivational conflicts. Shots include: cats in glass-sided experiment boxes responding to light and bell stimuli, opening food boxes, tripping an electric switch, finding the switch behind a barrier, exhibiting restlessness and fear as they are shocked and air-blasted, and exhibiting inhibited reactions to food and mice.
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13.
Title: Alcoholic addiction: differential diagnosis: passive-aggressive personality
Date: 1969
Run Time: 6 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: The purpose of this "telexample" program is to present a passive-aggressive condition accompanied by alcoholism. The case illustrated is a middle-aged male who has a twelve-year history of drinking. During the interview, the patient expresses his concern about the effect of drinking on his life. The discussion includes his description of why he drinks -- as a method of escape and because of nervousness. The interview continues with the patient realizing that he has not only a drinking problem, but a mental illness as well.
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14.
Title: Alcoholic patient and his physician
Date: 1964
Run Time: 35 min.
Names: University of Iowa, Motion Picture Unit; University of Iowa, Dept. of Psychiatry; State Psychopathic Hospital (Iowa City, Iowa)
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to differentiate between addictive and nonaddictive alcoholism, emphasizing treatment for each type. Mock interviews with alcoholics are presented, illustrating distinguishing features of the two types, special problems resulting from alcoholism, and the physician's role in a total treatment program. Descriptions of six major steps in the treatment of alcoholism are detailed. The key idea conveyed is the importance of the relationship between patient and physician; if not a strong one, it is unlikely that patients will heed the treatment recommendations. At the conclusion of the program a summary of each step of treatment is given. Statistics are included.
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15.
Title: American alcoholic, part 1
Date: 1968
Run Time: 31 min.
Names: National Broadcasting Company, Inc.
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to depict the plight of the American alcoholic. He lives in the richest and most technically skilled country in the world and yet he is ignored, ridiculed, and neglected. The film includes interviews with alcoholic patients and footage of alcoholics lying in streets and doorways and being arrested and sent to jail. Patients describe their lifestyles prior to and since becoming alcoholics. The program notes that authorities repeatedly jail the alcoholic for lack of detoxification centers, despite a recent Supreme Court ruling that chronic alcoholism is a valid defense against the charge of drunkenness. It also stresses that there are very few areas in the United States in which a derelict alcoholic is treated as any other sick person and hospitalized for treatment. According to this presentation, there are an estimated six million alcoholics in the United States. All of them drink excessively to make some life situation more tolerable. Many die in the streets or in jail and some are institutionalized for life in mental hospitals. At present there is no known cure for the disease.
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16.
Title: American alcoholic, part 2
Date: 1968
Run Time: 24 min.
Names: National Broadcasting Company, Inc.; Len Giovannitti
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to present different forms of treatment for the rehabilitation of alcoholics. Three alcoholics undergoing therapy sessions at different treatment centers are profiled. The first case presented is a man undergoing treatment at an alcoholic rehabilitation center in Avon Park, Florida. In this case, a family session with a counselor is shown, and members discuss their feelings and problems with alcoholism. Another form of rehabilitation illustrated in this program is a group therapy session with female alcoholics at Central Islip State Hospital. Through these sessions, the patients gain reassurance by relating similar experiences and feelings about alcoholism. The last type of treatment shown is a one-to-one patient/doctor consultation. In this example, the doctor helps a 24-year-old woman verbalize the feelings of isolation, emotional pain, and fear she has experienced during her six years of alcoholism. The presentation concludes by stating that although there are no cures for alcoholism, the methods illustrated in this film are helpful in controlling the disease. The program emphasizes that rehabilitation is not only the responsibility of the patient himself, but of everyone.
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17.
Title: Angry boy
Date: 1951
Run Time: 31 min.
Names: Appel, Kenneth E.; Rennie, Thomas A. C.; National Association for Mental Health
Abstract: A nine-year-old was caught stealing in school. Instead of treating the child as a criminal, the court referred his parents to a child guidance clinic for treatment of the child. This film is a presentation of modern child psychiatry in action. It is also the story of a troubled child who is helped by changed parental attitudes brought about by professional help.
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18.
Title: Anxiety neurosis with phobic features
Date: 1969
Run Time: 14 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" or televised segment, consists of excerpts from three psychiatric interviews with a patient displaying an anxiety neurosis with phobic features. The case shown in this segment is a young man who shows multiple phobic symptoms, marked tension, and anxiety. The main phobic feature found in this patient is a fear of hospital situations, which he expresses by fainting. The patient also describes other phobias including a fear of meeting new people and a fear of his boss. The anxiety features illustrated by this patient are shown by his inappropriate expression of anger, e.g. laughter, and his dependency needs for acceptance from other people.
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19.
Title: Anxiety neurosis, chronic
Date: 1969
Run Time: 7 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation consists of televised excerpts or "telexamples" from a ten-minute psychiatric interview session. The patient shown in this presentation is a middle-aged man who is plagued by feelings of self-doubt and inadequacy, which he expresses as "worrying over simple things." The patient also worries excessively about his health in general, with special concern expressed about his epididymitis. Throughout the interview he discusses his multiple somatic complaints including "stomach troubles" and vomiting. Additional anxiety symptoms shown by this patient include his inability to hold a job, suspiciousness regarding his wife's faithfulness, and a fear of large crowds.
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20.
Title: Appraisal of competency
Date: 1956
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Davidson, Henry A.; Nebraska Psychiatric Institute, Community Services Division
Abstract: This film details the criteria physicians should use to make legal decisions regarding a patient's competency. The live narrator explains each criterion and then a humorous animation follows to further illustrate the narrator's point.
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21.
Title: Approach to objects by psychotic children
Date: 1957
Run Time: 10 min.
Names: Anthony, E. James; Institute of Psychiatry, the Maudsley Hospital (London, UK); New York University Film Library
Abstract: This silent film was shot in Maudsley Hospital, London, and shows children handling various types of objects, placing them in their mouths, and looking around for the objects when they are removed. Apparently in contrast to non-psychotic children, these subjects search for a missing object only in the place where it was located immediately prior to removal -- the child's left hand, for example.
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22.
Title: Aspects of childhood psychosis
Date: 1957
Run Time: 33 min.
Names: Anthony, E. James; Institute of Psychiatry, the Maudsley Hospital (London, UK); New York University Film Library
Abstract: This film presents four cases of childhood psychosis: footage of a boy shying away from others, a boy slapping himself while another boy bangs his head against the wall, and a young girl in an uncontrollable temper tantrum. Many young children are shown who are destined to have childhood psychoses resulting from genetic inheritance, cerebral syphilis, or endocrine troubles. In one instance, a child will not let go of his father; this is a case of Mahler’s symbiotic psychosis. One boy displays a repetitive chopping motion with hands while another boy rocks back and forth, both considered autoerotic behavior. Another boy slaps himself constantly after being released from a straitjacket; this is diagnosed as auto-aggressive behavior. Finally, a child no longer runs away from people but towards them, symbolizing a gradual progression from psychosis to health.
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23.
Title: Assignment home
Date: 1945
Run Time: 26 min.
Names: U.S. Navy
Abstract: This film follows three sailors who have been discharged from the Navy after being hospitalized for "nerves" as they face the uncertainties of civilian life. The first, a farmer, returns home to face the frustrations of rebuilding his farm after several years of neglect. The second sailor deals with an overprotective mother and the search for a job. The third enters college but feels like a misfit because he is older than the other students. Before they left the hospital they were told four basic rules to help them adjust to civilian life. The rules were: stand on your own feet, get to work right away, mix with other people, and learn to solve your own problems. Each man finds encouragement in the people he meets. The men are shown as they gradually adjust to civilian life.
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24.
Title: Athetoid gestures in a deteriorating parergasic
Date: 1938
Run Time: 5 min.
Names: Leighton, Alexander H.; Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic (Baltimore, Md.); Spring Grove State Hospital (Catonsville, Md.); Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film demonstrates the ritualistic, stereotypic hand gestures of a 22-year-old schizophrenic patient. The gestures have a pattern suggesting symbolic meaning, and the same patterns are repeated in various combinations. While superficially the gestures suggest athetosis, the patterns make it evident that the condition really is quite different. Shot at Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic and Spring Grove State Hospital.
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25.
Title: Attitudes and health
Date: 1949
Run Time: 10 min.
Names: Smiley, Dean Franklin; Hein, Fred V.; Coronet Instructional Films (Glenview, Ill.)
Abstract: A physician explains how negative attitudes invite failure and how to build attitudes to achieve desired goals.
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26.
Title: Battered child
Date: 1969
Run Time: 58 min.
Names: WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.); National Educational Television; University of Colorado; Kempe, C. Henry; Helfer, Ray E.; Wille, Lois
Abstract: This title aims to provide an overview of battered-child syndrome using photographs of abused children, actual and simulated interviews with nurses, physicians, children and parents, and scenes from meetings of the Battered Child Team at the University of Colorado Medical Center. This program stresses the importance of recognizing that there are two victims - the child and the parent. Emphasis is placed on the importance of prompt reporting of any suspected case of child abuse. Several children are presented, and their injuries and home conditions described. The future placement of these children is also explored, as are the legal implications of child abuse. Colorado's role in developing legislation in child abuse and in trying to amend the current laws is discussed. The program stresses the importance of developing legislation that will not only protect the child but also protect the rights of the parents while preventing them from harming their children.
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27.
Title: Behavior disturbances after bilateral removal of the frontal areas of the cortex in cats
Date: 1938
Run Time: 13 min.
Names: Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows behavioral experiences in cats after either removal of the entire frontal cortex or removal of only the cortex anterior to motor regions. Experimental results include: abolishment of placing and hopping reactions, defects in posture and locomotion, mastication defects, compulsive pursuit behavior, general hyperactivity, and impairment in ability to acquire complex skill. Film includes close-ups of stabilimeter in use.
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28.
Title: Behavior therapy with an autistic child
Date: 1965
Run Time: 42 min.
Names: Stanford University, Department of Psychology; Davison, Gerald C.; Krasner, Leonard
Abstract: This program presents a session of behavior therapy with a six-year-old male child who is considered autistic. Initially, a very brief description of behavior therapy is presented by two psychologists. Scenes from an actual session are then presented. Prior to the filming, the child and the therapist had had no contact with each other. During the first fifteen minutes of the session, the child's behavior is guided and controlled by means of social reinforcement. During this time the child is whiny, unruly, and uncooperative. The therapist then uses the systematic application of reinforcement in the form of small chocolate candies to encourage obedience and responsive behavior. Changes in the child's behavior are observed. He doesn't appear whiny, and responds more appropriately and cooperatively to the therapist. The two psychologists then briefly summarize the use of behavior therapy with this child. The benefits of this type of therapy on a long-range basis are noted.
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29.
Title: Blocks to therapeutic communication
Date: 1970
Run Time: 23 min.
Names: Concept Media (Costa Mesa, Ca.)
Abstract: This program identifies blocks to therapeutic communication. Dramatized interviews with four different patients and nurses are employed to help define and illustrate these ineffective communication techniques. Such techniques include using reassuring clichés, giving advice, giving approval, requesting an explanation, agreeing with the patient, expressing disapproval, belittling the patient's feelings, disagreeing with the patient, defending making stereotyped comments, and changing the subject.
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30.
Title: Bold new approach
Date: 1965
Run Time: 27 min.
Names: Yolles, Stanley F.; Kaufman, M. Ralph; Mental Health Film Board (New York, N.Y.); National Institute of Mental Health
Abstract: In an attempt to interpret for an architect the basic concept of a comprehensive community mental health center, a psychiatrist presents several case histories. We see how troubled men, women, and children can be helped by inpatient and outpatient treatment, day and night hospitals, emergency service, rehabilitation services, special services for children, referral to and consultation with other community agencies, preventive programs, and diagnostic and evaluation services. This film also emphasizes that the concept of the comprehensive center is a flexible one that can be molded to meet the needs of different kinds of communities. Seven different locations were photographed to show the various services in action--what they look like, whom they serve, how they function. The film makes the point that these services must mesh to provide comprehensive, continuous care.
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31.
Title: Booked for safekeeping
Date: 1959
Run Time: 32 min.
Names: Matthews, Robert A.; Louisiana Association for Mental Health; National Institute of Mental Health; Stoney Associates
Abstract: This film was made to show policemen proper procedures for handling mentally disturbed citizens who are causing harm to themselves or others in public. Demonstrations include work with the mentally challenged, spousal abusers, suicidal citizens, and those with senile dementia. The film stresses working with partners or teams to subdue a volatile situation.
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32.
Title: Brain damaged child
Date: 1968
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: "Prall, Robert C.; Griffel, Margaret Dealy; Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute; Pennsylvania State Univ. Psychological Cinema Register
Abstract: The case of a seven-year-old child with a diagnosis of chronic organic brain syndrome is presented, with a focus on communication deficits related to the disorder. The child, Bobby, and the psychiatrist, Dr. Margaret Dealy Griffel, are interviewed. The program notes that Bobby is one of four boys to be filmed under similar circumstances to differentiate certain psychiatric syndromes seen in childhood. The physical manifestations of organic brain syndrome are observed to result from disruption of perceptual thought organization and spatial arranging, seen not only in body activity but also in the organization of the ego. Bobby's appearance, speech, intelligence, affect, motor behavior, capacity to relate, reality-testing and thought-life are discussed as he plays with toys and clay and attempts to assemble a toy figure of some sort. According to Dr. Griffel, Bobby demonstrates mild to moderate hypermobility, distractibility, hyperreactiveness, disinhibition, awkwardness of body movement, toe-walking, and difficulties with visual-motor coordination. At times he recognizes his difficulties and either denies or responds to them with regressiveness and resentment. Sibling rivalry and castration anxiety present in all children of this age are heightened by the brain damage.
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33.
Title: Breakdown
Date: 1951
Run Time: 40 min.
Names: Lehmann, Heinz E.; Mental Health Division, National Film Board of Canada
Abstract: Using the case history approach, this film depicts the onset of a schizophrenic breakdown in a 23-year-old woman, her treatment, and her eventual release from a well-equipped mental hospital. Subordinate themes urge that mental illness be recognized and diagnosed in a timely fashion and that it be accepted as fully as is physical illness.
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34.
Title: Carol & Dr. Fischer: model for a psychiatric interview
Date: 1967
Run Time: 49 min.
Names: Brown Camps Residential Treatment Centre; Allan King Associates; Canadian Educational Programs; Adler, Terry; Brown, John; Fischer, Martin
Abstract: This program presents an interview between 16-year-old Carol and Dr. Fischer. The interview takes place in what appears to be the day room of a psychiatric treatment center. One female staff member and a young boy join in the interview during the last few minutes. The interview begins with a discussion of Carol's current activity, writing a letter to her parents in response to a letter she has received from her mother. In this letter her mother expresses a desire for Carol to win a swimming meet. Dr. Fischer encourages Carol to talk about her feelings regarding her inability to live up to her parents' expectations and their seeming lack of concern for her. Later on in the interview Carol further explores her feelings toward her parents. Dr. Fischer discusses two of Carol's dreams. In both dreams, Carol reveals fears regarding loved ones leaving her. Carol also is led to describe her feelings and experiences during previous hospitalizations. Near the end of the interview Carol sits on Dr. Fischer's lap and with encouragement writes a letter to her parents in which she expresses her real feelings towards them. She then crumples up the letter and throws it away. Dr. Fischer notes that feelings should not be thrown away.
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35.
Title: Case of aphasia: showing difficulty in word-finding, in comprehension, and in handling complex ideas
Date: 1939
Run Time: 18 min.
Names: Leighton, Alexander H.; Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic (Baltimore, Md.); Spring Grove State Hospital (Catonsville, Md.); Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows a psychiatric examination of a 53-year-old male nurse, who, seven months before the film was made, suffered slight hemiplegia and aphasia. The paralysis largely cleared but aphasia persisted. The film demonstrates general narrowing of mental activity, specific difficulties in finding words, and moderate disturbances in comprehension. The case shows amnestic or nominal aphasia, the most apparent defect lying in evocation of nouns. Shot at Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic and Spring Grove State Hospital of Maryland.
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36.
Title: Case study of multiple personality
Date: 1923
Run Time: 14 min.
Names: Wholey, C. C.; Carroll, Edward J.
Abstract: This film records a case of multiple personality. A woman (Mrs. X) regresses to a childhood state (Susie). She also has another, less well-developed secondary personality (Jack). Later, in response to the death of her parish priest, Mrs. X goes into a trance state for 24 hours and emerges as a baby with a mental age of about one year. The patient is seen at a family picnic, and later, as Susie, writing down answers to questions. There appears to be a struggle between Susie and Jack, and when Jack appears, he exhibits male posture and handshake. Mrs. X hides from the camera, while Susie enjoys the spotlight. Mrs. X is also seen emerging from a trance state as a baby, exhibiting the behavior of a one-year-old. She plays with a ball and a doll, claps her hands, and puts things into her mouth. The last shots of the film are of the family 15 years later, outside their home. There are an adult male (Mr. X?), Mrs. X. and four children.
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37.
Title: Catatonia cases after IV sodium amytal injection
Date: 1936
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: Bleckwenn, William J.
Abstract: This film demonstrates the first use of an intravenous barbiturate for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Three catatonic patients are shown before and after treatment of sodium amytal ("truth serum"). Before, one patient is a rigid catatonic, another is catatonic with muscular movements, and the last is catatonic with negativism. Three to four hours after injection, each patient is eating, walking, and smiling. In addition, the film shows the third case being injected and the immediate response in her muscles. The film includes a shot of a mother, father, and baby with a revived catatonic patient.
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38.
Title: Catatonic behavior in a deteriorated parergasic
Date: 1938
Run Time: 7 min.
Names: Leighton, Alexander H.; Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic (Baltimore, Md.); Spring Grove State Hospital (Catonsville, Md.); Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows the posture, hypertrophied neck muscles, and ritualistic and stereotypic method of eating of a patient, age 45, who lay in bed for a year and a half with his head held unsupported above the pillows during all waking hours. Shot at the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic and Spring Grove State Hospital.
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39.
Title: Chemistry of behavior
Date: 1962
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Darley, John; Grossman, Sebastian; Russell, Roger; Weitz, Joseph; American Psychological Association; Mayer-Sklar; National Educational Television
Abstract: This program provides a broad overview of the use of psychoactive drugs in research to determine the biochemical aspects of behavior. During the program, two scientists explore, in general terms, the use of drugs in basic psychology. The first is the chairman of the department of psychology at the University of Indiana, Dr. Roger Russell. He discusses the effect of drugs on behavior and describes measurement techniques. For example, rats and barriers are arranged in a field in such a way as to evaluate the rat's ability to solve problems in order to reach food. The influence of drugs on this behavior is described, as are experiments using a rat and a tank of water to test the animal’s escape behavior. Tests to evaluate how drugs affect behavior over a period of time in both monkeys and humans are detailed. Dr. Sebastian Grossman of the University of Iowa describes studies designed to determine where in the brain these behavior-influencing biochemical events occur. Dr. Grossman mentions experiments in which a cannula is placed directly into a specific area of the brain to evaluate the effects of drugs on hunger or thirst in rats. Studies on human clinical subjects to evaluate the biochemical effects of stress on the gastrointestinal system are briefly described. Double-blind studies are used to evaluate the effects of tranquilizers on behavior.
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40.
Title: Child analyses, Psychoanalytic Sanatorium, Stamford, Connecticut
Date: 1930?
Run Time: 25 min.
Names: Clark, L. Pierce
Abstract: This film represents the first use of a motion picture in child analysis. The film was used to study the play activities of children with psychiatric problems. The first case is a white female, eight years old, with petit mal seizures. She demonstrates tantrums and rebelliousness. She shows oral sadism and cannibalism toward the analyst. When the analyst acts out a seizure, the child holds on to her. The child shoots an imaginary policeman. The second case is a white male, age 19, with epilepsy, who plays both female and male roles.
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41.
Title: Childhood schizophrenia
Date: 196-?
Run Time: 42 min.
Names: Finch, Stuart M.; University of Michigan School of Medicine, Dept. of Psychiatry; Sandoz Pharmaceuticals, Medical Film Library
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to illustrate several types of childhood schizophrenia and the forms of treatment used for them. This objective is achieved through a presentation of actual therapy sessions in a children's psychiatric hospital. The three types of childhood schizophrenia illustrated are early infantile autism, symbiotic psychotic, and borderline psychotic. A brief portrayal of the conditions for each type is given. This program proposes three phases of treatment, consisting of breaking through the autistic barrier, helping to develop new ego skills, and resolution of intropsychic and interpersonal conflicts. The methods of treatment illustrated in this film include individual, group, recreational, and occupational therapy. The presentation concludes with a summary of the phases of treatment. Emphasis is placed on the assumption of both biological and psychological factors in the basic etiology.
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42.
Title: Chronic epidemic encephalitis
Date: 1945
Run Time: 4 min.
Names: Bellevue Hospital (New York, N.Y.); Shiras, Sarah P.
Abstract: Patients suffering from chronic epidemic encephalitis are shown catching and throwing a soft object; walking and running; having a wrist bent; sitting and standing; smiling and laughing. One patient tries to take off his trousers and tries to tie a cord belt. The involuntary movement of the tongue is demonstrated. A patient and attendants are seen walking and running on a hospital porch with a city scene in the background. The patient demonstrates his ability to walk backward.
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43.
Title: Combat exhaustion
Date: 1943
Run Time: 50 min
Names: U.S. Army Pictorial Service, Signal Corps
Abstract: This is a training film for World War II military physicians. Early recognition and treatment of neuropsychiatric conditions in the combat zone, the need to understand the exhausted soldier, and treatment by narcosis therapy and chemical hypnosis are presented. In a neuropsychiatric hospital, the chief physician interviews a number of patients, one by one, and then explains their neuroses to the medical officers accompanying him. The three major sections of the facility are shown and explained: admission, treatment, and rehabilitation. Treatment may consist of sleep therapy, appetite stimulation by insulin, electro-shock therapy, exercise, and re-education. For combat zone exhaustion, recommended treatments include separation of exhausted from physically wounded soldiers, calming the hysterical patient, reassurance, food, rest, and tranquilizing agents. The prodromal signs of exhaustion are discussed - poor physical coordination, slowing of mental processes, excessive reaction to noise, inability to relax and rest, and outbursts of temper. Shots include: a "shell-shocked" soldier being seen in a combat-zone clearing station, an army physician lecturing to other physicians on combat exhaustion, and patients being treated at a large treatment facility.
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44.
Title: Combat fatigue irritability
Date: 1945
Run Time: 36 min.
Names: U.S. Navy, Bureau of Aeronautics; Kelly, Gene
Abstract: This film presents the case of a Navy seaman suffering from combat fatigue. He is first shown at his duty station in the engine room of a ship, manipulating water pipe valves. The scene then shifts to a hospital ward; the sailor’s ship has been torpedoed and sunk. The patient has not suffered any physical wounds, but he is jumpy, nervous, combative, and short-tempered. He goes home on a 30-day leave, thinking all will be well once he is away from the hospital and the military. But he blows up at his family, walks the streets, gets drunk, and fights with his girlfriend. The only people he feels comfortable with are other servicemen home on leave. He becomes so distraught when hunting in the woods with his father that he is taken to a doctor and then sent back to the Navy hospital. He is aware now that he is ill and cannot cope with civilian or military life. Talking about his deep feelings and fears in individual and group therapy sessions helps the sailor recognize and deal with his problems. This film acquaints the patient suffering from combat exhaustion with the nature of his illness and the therapy necessary for recovery. Stars Gene Kelly.
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45.
Title: Combat fatigue: psychosomatic disorders
Date: 1946
Run Time: 23 min
Names: Pathescope Company of America; U.S. Navy
Abstract: This film uses cartoon animation and simple language to explain the nature and causes of combat fatigue and to outline how to recover from it. Over fluoroscopic views of the heart, head, back, and stomach, the narrator begins to describe combat fatigue. Although tests show these structures are normal, the patients, who all had seen combat, complain of pain in the indicated areas. A medical officer is shown speaking to a group, explaining that these pains are caused by fear. Animated cartoons are used to explain the effect of fear on the body. Civilian situations which may produce fear, such as a classroom test, seeing a street accident, having to speak in public, and a domestic dispute, are shown. The lecturing officer recommends accepting one's symptoms, then finding the real cause of the symptoms, which will lead to a cure. He performs a shadow show to illustrate his points. Shots include: patients demonstrating their symptoms in a doctor's office; men in various areas aboard a ship.
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46.
Title: Combat psychiatry: the battalion medical officer
Date: 1954
Run Time: 36 min.
Names: Cascade Pictures of California, Inc.; U.S. Navy
Abstract: This film is an introduction to combat psychiatry for medical officers, line officers, and corpsmen. At sick call the night before a battle, men present with physical symptoms such as upset stomach and headache that signal their mental distress. The medical officer decides, based on his own examination and on information gathered from officers or men in the patient's unit, whether the patient should be sent back to his unit or evacuated. The importance of emotional support is shown. The second reel of this film shows the medical officers and corpsmen dealing with after-action combat fatigue and other casualties. In examining and interviewing the combat fatigue casualties, the medical officers identify those who simply need rest and reassurance versus those having a serious reaction that may require removal from active combat. The implications of this are addressed -- if sent to the rear, a soldier may lose his identification with his own fighting group and develop symptoms that will unconsciously justify his escape from combat. The types of breakdowns that signal that a man should never again be sent to a frontline unit are shown and discussed. The basic principle of combat psychiatry is to treat as far forward as reasonable and return to duty as quickly as possible. Shots include: activity in and around a very small U.S. Marine encampment in barren, rocky terrain; medical officers treating Marines at this same camp.
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47.
Title: Combat psychiatry: the division psychiatrist
Date: 1954
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Cascade Pictures of California Inc.; U.S. Navy
Abstract: This film depicts the handling of neuropsychiatric (NP) casualties by a military psychiatrist. The importance of rest, food, drink, and, if necessary, sedation, is emphasized. This is handled as far forward as possible. After the first 24 hours, the man is evaluated. He may be kept another 24 hours, then sent back to combat, or he may need further care. The psychiatrist's assessment of the NP patient takes into account not only his present condition, but his past service record and the position he currently holds. The psychiatrist conducts individual interviews with patients in which the patients can express terror, resentment, and grief. He sees to it that the men engage in sports and games. The psychiatrist also must establish and maintain good relations with the rest of the medical service in his division. The film notes that generally, the chances of returning a man to effective duty diminish with each successive rearward evacuation. The importance of the corpsman in the recovery process is outlined. Shots include scenes of military camps and of casualties being cared for in the admissions tent of an aid station, as well as soldiers suffering from a variety of NP illnesses.
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48.
Title: Community health in action
Date: 1954
Run Time: 22 min.
Names: Orleans, Sam
Abstract: This film shows the benefit of coordination and collaboration among health departments, volunteer organizations, doctors, nurses, dentists, and other citizens to deliver health services, including mental health, in the community. The film notes that psychiatric therapy has less of a stigma than it once did, and families are more willing to seek help for children with behavior and other difficulties. A psychologist is shown observing a little girl at play and painting and drawing, to help him better understand issues her mother says she is having at home.
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49.
Title: Conversion reaction
Date: 1962
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Cohen, Sheldon B.; U.S. Communicable Disease Center
Abstract: This program presents an interview between a psychiatrist and a 19-year-old woman with three children, illustrating a conversion reaction. In the initial part of the interview the patient describes her difficulties with headaches, blackout spells, and paralysis of her right arm and leg, which began during her third pregnancy. She states that she was happy about her pregnancy. Although she says she gets angry with her husband, she denies it is a serious problem. The patient is hypnotized during the interview. Afterward she describes her intense feelings of anger toward her husband and expresses her desire to leave him. During this part of the interview her right arm and leg appear to be paralyzed. At the end of the interview the psychiatrist states that the hypnotism was used primarily for the purpose of exploration. He also says that the girl is a dependent person who can't admit to angry feelings. Her paralysis seems to result from the conversion of these angry feelings.
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50.
Title: Convulsive and allied conditions
Date: 1944
Run Time: 13 min.
Names: Balser, Benjamin H.; Goodhart, Simon P.; Montefiore Hospital, Neuropsychiatric Division
Abstract: This film shows 11 cases of convulsive and allied conditions. An analysis of each type is made to clarify the points of differentiation between them with special reference to their etiology. Included are: generalized tic or maladie des tics, generalized myoclonic movements following acute epidemic encephalitis, myoclonus epilepsy, Unverricht, palatal myoclonus, catalepsy, narcolepsy associated with cataplexy, convulsive state in hypoglycemia, Jacksonian seizures, and convulsions of psychogenic origin. Some scenes were shot in 1922.
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51.
Title: Convulsive shock therapy in affective psychoses
Date: 1943
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital (Omaha, Neb.); Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College; Bennett, Abram E.
Abstract: This film shows cases in support of the thesis that convulsive shock therapy can terminate severe depressions and most manic states within a few weeks. This film presents four cases to demonstrate behavior before and after treatment. Patients range in age from 42 to 58 and are all in depression states, some suicidal, some with self-mutilating tendencies. The "after" scenes include patients playing cards, doing woodwork, etc. This film also shows metrazol and electroshock convulsions in curarized patients. One such patient is seen immediately after her admission to the hospital screaming, pleading, and praying to die. The film ends with her as a recovered patient leaving the hospital and waving goodbye.
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52.
Title: Cry for help
Date: 1962
Run Time: 32 min.
Names: Rowland, Loyd W.; Stoney, George C.; Farberow, Norman L.; Shneidman, Edwin S.
Abstract: This film depicts several situations in which police must content with suicides or suicide attempts. The situations include those who attempt suicide while in jail, a young man in college who uses a rifle, a young woman living at home using pills, a middle-aged man who contemplates using a handgun when he finds out he has a severe health problem, and another woman who slashes her wrists.
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53.
Title: Cryptic automatic writing by a multiple personality
Date: 1941
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: Bucknell University, Dept. of Psychology; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College; Harriman, Philip L.
Abstract: This film shows an average college student being hypnotized to spur emergence of three different personalities. While presenting two of the personalities, the subject handwrites something and the writings are evaluated. An interesting note is that the turning of a pencil is the stimulus to change to a different personality.
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54.
Title: Current trends in the therapy for narcotic addiction
Date: 1969
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Casriel, Daniel H.; Jaffe, Jerome H.; Gearing, Frances; Daytop Village (New York, N.Y.); U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare
Abstract: Narcotics addiction, as seen by Dr. Daniel H. Casriel, is basically withdrawal behind a chemical as a response to stress -- a condition requiring intensive psychotherapy. This method of treatment is used at Daytop Village, New York, where patients live in a therapeutic community for approximately one and a half years. Dr. Jerome H. Jaffe, Director, Drug Abuse Program, State of Illinois, Department of Mental Health, questions the psychiatric approach and discusses methadone treatment of addicts in Chicago. He reports that this method allows the addict to return to the community promptly; that 75 percent of those treated are working; and that rate of return to narcotic use has been very low.
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55.
Title: Day hospital
Date: 1940
Run Time: 21 min.
Names: Bierer, Joshua; Television Reporters International
Abstract: This film profiles a London day hospital for people with "emotional illness." Located in a converted house, the place is on an ordinary street and is not a permanent residence, but provides daily assistance, including social interaction, meals, security, and "therapy in a controlled democracy." The concept was introduced before World War II as mental health treatment moved away from restraints and punishment and towards more humane approaches. A "therapeutic social club" is depicted, in which patients appear to be mixing with staff, dancing, and socializing.
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56.
Title: Dealing with problem people: a four part workshop
Date: 1969
Run Time: 27 min.
Names: National Safety Council; Gilbert Altschul Productions, Inc.
Abstract: This series of four short tapes illustrates how to deal with four types of employees: the disorderly worker, the forgetter, the hothead, and the scoffer. Industrial settings involving supervisor and peer relationships are used.
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57.
Title: Delirium tremens
Date: 1969
Run Time: 13 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This program contains televised excerpts or "telexamples" from a half-hour psychiatric interview session. The patient shown in this film is a middle-aged man with vivid hallucinations resulting from delirium tremens. He describes such hallucinations as animals, snakes, and other reptiles. The patient describes his drinking problem as a mild one, stating that he has "about got drinking whipped." Throughout most of the interview, this patient is totally out of contact with reality as shown by his lack of appropriate responses to the questions directed to him by the psychiatrist.
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58.
Title: Depressive neurosis
Date: 1969
Run Time: 3 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This program is a "telexample" or televised interview of a patient with a depressive neurosis. This presentation involves an interview with a psychiatrist and a middle-aged male displaying mild depression due to feelings of inadequacy and job stress. The patient feels that he is "living comfortably, but not making any progress." The interviewer conducts the session mainly by urging the patient to elaborate on his feelings concerning success in his job. Through this coaxing, the patient is able to verbalize his anxieties and frustration.
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59.
Title: Depressive neurosis: differential diagnosis: alcoholism
Date: 1969
Run Time: 6 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation contains televised excerpts or "telexamples" from two psychiatric interview sessions in which the patient illustrates characteristics of depressive neurosis. The patient shown is a middle-aged lady attempting to cope with marital difficulties through reliance on alcohol. In the first interview, she describes her husband's "inconsiderate" actions, specifically his neglect in visiting her when she previously was admitted to the hospital. In the following session, one week later, the patient describes her marital relationship as being improved. She states that all she needed was to "face up to reality." The differential diagnosis includes alcoholism.
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60.
Title: Depressive neurosis: differential diagnosis: schizoid personality
Date: 1969
Run Time: 5 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation consists of a "telexample" or televised excerpt of an interview between a psychiatrist and a psychiatric patient. It illustrates behaviors that accompany depressive neurosis in a schizoid personality. The case presented is a single young female who displays depression, feelings of rejection, and exaggerated dependency needs. This is shown by the patient's description of her relationship with her mother. The patient verbalizes her dependency needs by stating that she would like reassurance from the doctor that "these feelings are all right."
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61.
Title: Development of an infantile psychosis
Date: 1963
Run Time: 15 min.
Names: Jensen, Gordon D.; University of Washington, School of Medicine
Abstract: This film shows the various stages of development in an infantile psychosis, the results, and the improvements accomplished in nursery school, in the case of this male child.
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62.
Title: Diagnosis of childhood schizophrenia
Date: 1957
Run Time: 36 min.
Names: Affiliated Film; New York State Mental Health Authority
Abstract: This film traces the step-by-step procedure of screening clinical data in order to establish a diagnosis of childhood schizophrenia. The process involves a review of the pertinent historical material, psychological test findings, and clinical observations, while noting the absence of significant medical, neurological, and laboratory-positive test results. Differential diagnosis follows to rule out clinical syndromes with which childhood schizophrenia is commonly confused. The teamwork involved in the diagnostic effort is emphasized throughout. The film concludes with a therapeutic sequence which, in addition to pointing up some of the pathognomonic features present, also demonstrates the clinical approach to the schizophrenic child.
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63.
Title: Differential diagnosis: drug dependency, barbiturates
Date: 1969
Run Time: 9 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" depicts a psychiatric interview session with a patient, a middle-aged white woman, who is undergoing psychiatric treatment for addiction to barbiturates.
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64.
Title: Differential diagnosis: hysterical neurosis, conversion type
Date: 1969
Run Time: 8 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation consists of televised segments or "telexamples" from a fifteen-minute psychiatric interview session. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the behavior of a patient with a hypochondriacal neurosis as well as to demonstrate "confrontation questioning" used by the psychiatrist. The patient is a middle-aged woman whose conversation focuses almost exclusively on her somatic complaints, which include high blood pressure, nausea, and kidney dysfunction. In this program, the interviewer uses reality confrontation by questioning the patient's decision to visit a psychiatric hospital instead of a physician. The patient responds by stating that she is upset and figures "it must be emotional."
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65.
Title: Distant drummer: bridge from no place
Date: 1969?
Run Time: 23 min.
Names: Bazelon, David; Dole, Vincent; Head, Murdock; Yolles, Stanley; Airlie Productions; Daytop Village (New York, N.Y.); George Washington University, Dept. of Medical and Public Affairs; National Institute of Mental Health; Medical Society of the District of Columbia; American Academy of General Practice; Synanon House (Calif.)
Abstract: This videotape describes the 1960s drug culture. Addicts discuss their experiences in the United States and in Vietnam. Dr. Stanley Yolles, director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), talks about the drug culture and NIMH's role in prevention and treatment. The tape describes growth in the use of marijuana and heroin. David Bazelon, chief judge, U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., clarifies the narcotics laws. The state of California's attempts to develop a civil commitment program focused on treatment rather than punishment are described. In 1966, the Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act is the first law to give the addict a choice of treatment or jail. Synanon in California is a private, self-help, residential community that helps people deal with their addictions. New York's Daytop Village works not only with addicts on addictions, but on developing a new lifestyle. Methadone, though still experimental, has proved to be an effective treatment for heroin addiction. Dr. Vincent Dole, of New York’s Rockefeller University, justifies the program.
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66.
Title: Dominance, neurosis, and aggression in cats
Date: 1944
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College; Division of Psychiatry, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago; Otho S.A. Sprague Institute, University of Chicago
Abstract: This film shows experiments that are designed to investigate the behavioral dynamics of group dominance and aggression in normal and neurotic animals placed in situations of competition and motivational conflict. After individual conditioning, cats are trained in groups of four to compete for food after a bell-light signal. Together, they form a stable dominance hierarchy, and individuals secure food repeatedly without fighting. Aggressive fighting appears in animals either when displaced by a more dominant animal or when made experimentally neurotic. Goal-directed behavior then deviates into aggression mainly directed against animals higher in hierarchy. Amytal temporarily mitigates neurosis, and restores nonaggressive dominancy. Filmed at the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
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67.
Title: Drinking American
Date: 1968
Run Time: 31 min.
Names: Albertson, Eric; Gordon, Barbara; Perlmutter, A. H.; Indiana University Audio-visual Center; National Educational Television and Radio Center; WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.)
Abstract: This program provides an overview of the problem of alcohol abuse in the United States. It presents comments from teenage and adult male and female clinical subjects and various scenes from homes, bars, and schools. People describe why they drink alcoholic beverages and the effects of drinking upon their jobs, homes, and social life. The views of the Women's Christian Temperance Union are presented and the conflicting "unrealistic" laws of various states in regard to alcohol consumption are discussed. Two noted physicians present their views on alcohol and possible remedies to the current situation. According to this program, the two main reasons for the increase in alcohol abuse are loneliness and escape. While no remedies are presented, the program does explore measures to enact realistic legislation, educate people, change attitudes, and address the hypocrisy in liquor advertising. The problem of the teenage alcoholic is discussed and current measures taken by the public education system are explored and evaluated.
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68.
Title: Dynamics of an experimental neurosis: its development and techniques for its alleviation
Date: 1944
Run Time: 56 min.
Names: Masserman, Jules Hymen; Neurophysiological Laboratories of the Division of Psychiatry and of the Otho S.A. Sprague Memorial Institute, University of Chicago; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: Part 1 shows experiments demonstrating that conditioned responses can be established in cats and that these responses give way to neurotic behavior under certain circumstances. It shows conditioned training apparatus for releasing food pellets into a box, and cats being trained to respond to a light or bell signal by going to the food box, lifting the lid, and obtaining the food. Results of the experiment include inhibition of feeding, sensory hyperaesthesias, phobias, motor disturbances, recurrent physiological signs of anxiety, etc. Part 3 demonstrates that experimentally-induced neuroses in cats can be alleviated. This film demonstrates four therapeutic techniques: 1) diminution of one of the conflicting drives (animal is fed before being put in a cage), 2) retraining in a problem situation (petting, gentle hand-feeding, and reassurance), 3) environmental press (animal with maximally-reinforced hunger drive is brought toward food by a movable barrier), and 4) social example (a normal cat which has learned to feed at a signal is placed in the cage with a neurotic animal). Film shows feed box, with light-flash food signal and air blast.
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69.
Title: Early recognition of learning disability
Date: 1969
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke; Churchill Films
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to provide information on detecting minimal brain dysfunction at an early age, so that learning problems later in life are less likely. The film presents comparisons between normally-developing children and children with learning disabilities in an elementary school environment. The program illustrates common characteristics of children with possible brain dysfunction. These include hyperactive behavior, erratic body coordination, incorrect spatial relationships, and difficulties in abstract (conceptual) thinking. Activities are presented in which these problems are apparent, such as children attempting to draw and learning to write. The program concludes that if teachers and parents are familiar with the signs of minimal brain damage, they can prevent a disabled child from the confusion and frustration of falling behind. The methods suggested for helping these students include special teachers, resource rooms, and learning booths to protect against distraction.
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70.
Title: Effects of electroshock therapy on experimental neuroses
Date: 1945
Run Time: 19 min.
Names: Masserman, Jules Hymen; Jacques, Mary Grier; University of Chicago, Division of Psychiatry; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows the effects of electro-shock on normal and neurotic cats' behavior, in relation to possible histologic changes in the brain. Normal cats subjected to cerebral electroshock show impairment of complex and recently learned response patterns, as compared with relative persistence of simpler forms of adaptive behavior. Cats made experimentally "neurotic” by motivational conflicts, then subjected to electro-shock, show similar disorganization of complex inhibitions, compulsions, and phobias, thus releasing more nearly "normal" goal-directed behavior. Alterations of conduct cannot be correlated with pathologic changes in the brain detectable by standard histologic techniques.
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71.
Title: Effects of morphine on learned adaptive behavior and experimental neuroses in cats
Date: 1942
Run Time: 11 min.
Names: Masserman, Jules Hymen; Wikler, Abraham; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College; Neurophysiological Laboratories of the Division of Psychiatry and of the Otho S.A. Sprague Memorial Institute, University of Chicago
Abstract: Normal cats are trained to depress a platform switch that activates a feeding signal, and then to squeeze past a barrier to the feeding box. When morphine is administered, more complex and recently acquired behavior disappears, and the cats finally ignore food entirely. In three to four hours, learned behavior reappears but in the reverse order of its disappearance. In cats made neurotic, an injection of morphine produces a temporary abolition of neurotic behavior and the appearance of previously learned adaptive patterns. As the effects wear off, the neurotic behavior tends to reappear.
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72.
Title: Electroencephalogram
Date: 1941
Run Time: 10 min.
Names: Bennett, Abram E.; Cash, Paul T.; University of Nebraska at Omaha, Dept. of Neurology and Psychiatry; Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital, Psychiatric Dept. (Omaha, Neb.)
Abstract: This film demonstrates use of the electroencephalogram in research on human illness and behavior. The tracings demonstrate alpha and beta rhythms as well as patterns in epilepsy, brain tumors, schizophrenia, behavior problems, paresis, and paresis after fever therapy.
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73.
Title: Emotional health
Date: 1947
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Diehl, Howard S.; Dillenberg, Stanley M.; McGraw-Hill
Abstract: A youth consults a general practitioner for "heart trouble" and is told that he is in normal physical condition but may be experiencing cardiac symptoms due to functional disturbances arising from emotional stresses. Excerpts from several of the patient’s subsequent interviews with the psychiatrist are then recorded and the patient’s anxieties are traced to conflicting familial, sexual, and social attitudes.
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74.
Title: Epidemic encephalitis
Date: 1944
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Goodhart, Simon P.; Balser, Benjamin Harris; Montefiore Hospital for Chronic Diseases, Neuropsychiatric Division; Neurological Cinematographic Atlas
Abstract: This is a collection of 22 filmed cases taken from 1920-1926 in the Neuropsychiatric Division of Montefiore Hospital. Some cases show motor and other disturbances following acute epidemic encephalitis: champing movements, Parkinsonian posture, psychosis with delusional trends, tremors, rigidity, thalamic syndrome, Magnus de Kleijn postural design, dyssynergia, myoclonic movements, encephalo-oculogyric crisis, and self-mutilation with both eyes enucleated and all teeth removed by the patient. It shows some cases over a period of years.
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75.
Title: Experimental "neurosis" in a dog
Date: 1939
Run Time: 9 min.
Names: Gantt, W. Horsley; Leighton, Alexander H.; Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Pavlovian Laboratory (Baltimore, Md.)
Abstract: This film depicts lab experiments and observations of two dogs. A two-year-old male dog, Nick, is required to discriminate between a tone of 1012 frequency and one of 1024 frequency for six months. He fails and does not form a new conditioned food reflex in the laboratory. A "normal" dog, Billy, is trained and conditioned on and off-leash and demonstrates "normal" responses. Nick, the "neurotic" dog, is restless and ill at ease. He is given food but will not eat it; he lets it fall out of his mouth. When a leash is attached, Nick will not even put food in his mouth. Nick is taken outside the lab and fed. He eats, but stops and becomes restless as soon as the stimulus is sounded.
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76.
Title: Experimental compound MER-17 (Frenquel): new blocking agent against the development of LSD-25 psychosis
Date: 1955
Run Time: 32 min.
Names: Fabing, Howard D.; Hillard, William E.
Abstract: The following experiments are designed to assess the value of MER-17 in preventing and alleviating LSD-25 psychoses. The subject, a healthy 22-year-old male volunteer, is given 100 gamma of LSD-25 orally in distilled water. The investigator interviews the subject periodically over the next nine hours. The subject reports physical restlessness and mental apprehension, depression, confusion, sadness, loss of time perception, and nervousness. Nine hours after taking the drug, as its effects are wearing off, the subject reports feeling confused while under its influence. A day later, the subject reports that his feelings while under the influence of the drug were dissociated; he felt plagued, pounded. The following week, the subject is given a 5 mg. tablet of MER-17 twice a day for six days and one tablet on the seventh day. In interviews over the subsequent six hours, the subject reports feeling physically restless, but has none of the unpleasant mental reaction he had when he first took LSD alone. In the final experiment, the subject is shown under the influence of LSD. He is then given MER-17 intravenously, and his mental state begins to return to normal within minutes.
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77.
Title: Experimentally produced neurotic behavior in the rat
Date: 1938
Run Time: 16 min.
Names: Maier, Norman R. F.; Glaser, Nathan M.; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film is a pictorial presentation of neurotic behavior in rats, with an attempt at diagnosis. Rats are trained using the Lashley jumping apparatus to react in a certain manner. Afterwards, the stimulus is removed, and a situation is structured in which the only learned responses available are negative ones. The results are either new adaptations to old learned behavior, or neurotic behavior. Neurotic behavior begins with a violent outburst but is followed by passive behavior, even when the rat is returned to his cage with other rats.
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78.
Title: Faces of depression
Date: 1960
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Robert Anderson Associates; Montréal General Hospital; Jewish Hospital of Hope; Verdun Protestant Hospital
Abstract: This film includes an image of a 16th-century artist's sketch of depression, as well as physician interviews with many men and women who suffer from depression. Interviews include: an elderly woman who is soft-spoken and agitated, a young woman who tried to commit suicide and is reticent in answering questions, a female schizophrenic who consistently looks down and is unable to say "no," an elderly man who admits that he drinks heavily in response to depression, and a middle-aged business man who feels hopeless. The doctors stress that depression is an illness that can be treated and relieved.
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79.
Title: Fantasies and children
Date: 1966
Run Time: 57 min.
Names: Moses, Campbell; Ross, Helen; Greco, Ray S. (Ray Silvio); Kenna, Marita D.; University of Pittsburgh
Abstract: Originally shown on closed-circuit TV as part of the postgraduate program of the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, this film features Helen Ross, educator, psychoanalyst, and expert on children. On the panel with her are Marita Kenna, M.D., child psychiatrist, and Ray Greco, M.D., general practitioner. The discussion is on the fantasy world of small children, mostly of pre-school age, concerning their own body image, the meaning of illness, what going to the hospital or doctor's office means, etc. Emphasis is placed on the need for the adults (parents, physicians, nurses, etc.) to realize the existence of the fantasy world and the need to understand it.
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80.
Title: Fears of children
Date: 1952
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Bryan, Julien Hequembourg; Hellams, Alfred A.; Senn, Milton J. E.; Ridenour, Nina; International Film Foundation; National Association for Mental Health
Abstract: A series of episodes typical of those arising in families with small children shows how the fears of a normal five-year-old named Paul are related to feelings about parents. His fears--of the dark, of being alone, of new situations--not only prevent him from enjoying experiences that other boys enjoy, but tend to widen the gap of misunderstanding between him and his parents. The film points out that Paul's feelings are common to children of his age and may be accentuated when parents become either unduly protective or over-severe.
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81.
Title: Feeling of hostility
Date: 1948
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: Prados, Miguel; Allan Memorial Institute, McGill University; Royal Victoria Hospital (Montréal, Québec); Mental Health Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada; National Film Board of Canada
Abstract: This films covers the case history of a young woman who is outwardly successful, but has an inadequate personality. The cause of her feelings of resentment toward others and the resulting failure in personal relationships are traced in detail through her early childhood, until we see her in a responsible editorial job in a publishing firm, her hostility directed into constructive effort. A trailer is attached to the film, in which a psychiatrist sums up several factors that have contributed to the development of her particular personality, her emotional inadequacy, and her feelings of hostility in personal relationships. He suggests some ways parents can avoid similar patterns of development in their children.
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82.
Title: Feeling of rejection: its development and growth
Date: 1947
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Ruddick, Bruce; Allan Memorial Institute, McGill University; Royal Victoria Hospital (Montréal, Québec); Mental Health Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada; National Film Board of Canada
Abstract: This is the dramatization of the case history of Margaret, a 23-year-old girl who has physical disorders with no clear cause. A psychiatrist, probing Margaret’s past, shows her the root of her troubles--childhood overprotection and discouragement of her efforts to express herself, resulting in a crippling fear of failure and a complete inability to assert herself. When Margaret understands her problem, she begins to handle it, starting new and healthier habits of behavior.
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83.
Title: Feelings of depression
Date: 1950
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: Prados, Miguel; Ruddick, Bruce; Cameron, Ewen; Stogdill, Charles G.; Mental Health Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada; National Film Board of Canada
Abstract: This is the case history of John Murray, in his early thirties, ordinarily a conscientious, hard-working businessman, who suddenly suffers periods of great despondency. The film shows how the use of resources in psychiatry can help him better understand himself and his history.
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84.
Title: Feelings of overdependency
Date: 1949
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: National Film Board of Canada
Abstract: This film tells the story of a young married man who is unable to face the ordinary problems of life. The cause stems from a childhood too dependent on his mother and sister. This leads to multiple vague physical complaints in addition to an inability to maintain an adequate vocational adjustment. Treatment results in the elimination of physical complaints and helps him acquire greater stability in his vocation.
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85.
Title: Field psychiatry for the general medical officer
Date: 1950
Run Time: 45 min.
Names: U.S. Army
Abstract: The purpose of this film is to acquaint the field medical officer with the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of combat exhaustion. The battlefield conditions that lead to acute anxiety neurosis in a British soldier, his evacuation from the front to an aid station, and his sympathetic treatment by the medical officer there are presented in story form. The medical officer discusses combat exhaustion with his sergeant. Footage is shown of soldiers suffering from confusion, anxiety, hysterical conversion, and dissociation. Basic initial treatment consists of hot food and drink and a sedative. Severe cases are sent to the rear to the corps exhaustion center. Usually, a six-day stay is sufficient for recovery. For the first 48 hours in the center, the patient is allowed plenty of hot food and sedated sleep. For the second 48 hours, he socializes, plays games, and does light work like mending and repairing his gear. During this period, he is interviewed by a psychiatrist. During the third 48-hour period, he returns to normal garrison life. At the end of six days, if he is considered fit, he returns to his unit. A medical officer explains the nature of combat exhaustion to a skeptical line officer.
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86.
Title: Fountain House
Date: 1969
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Fountain House; Beard, John; WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.)
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the work done by the staff and residents of Fountain House, a mental health community facility in New York City. The history of Fountain House is traced from its beginning in 1948 as a club for women recently discharged from private and public mental health hospitals, through the present day. The old facility is shown first, then the new building that was constructed and opened 18 months before the filming of this program. The residents are shown involved in arts and crafts, social functions, and various jobs such as typing, messenger services, etc. Members operate the switchboard, the canteen, and a thrift shop. Other residents purchase food and operate the lunchroom at the House, serving about 200 lunches per day. The program stresses the importance of determining areas in which a patient can be productive and use his capabilities. The program then focuses on the importance of the community in helping to plan and meet the needs of the residents. A local fast food chain is asked to allow residents to come in and learn the assistant manager's job for several hours each day. This effort led to the employment of other residents on a full and part-time basis. Fountain House also rented 26 apartments in various neighborhoods, in which several members can pool their resources, live within their means, and avoid loneliness.
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87.
Title: Free-expression painting in child psychiatry
Date: 1966
Run Time: 17 min.
Names: Geigy Pharmaceuticals; Condor-Films Ltd.; Edelmann, Claude; Amado, Georges.; Genti, R.; Lebovici, L.
Abstract: This program shows the use of free-expression painting in child psychiatry, which is portrayed as both an educational and a therapeutic technique. Disturbed children are often more dominated by fantasies than normal children and their paintings can aid in establishing a diagnosis. For the paintings to have therapeutic value, they must be related to the patient’s other paintings, to the medical history, and to clinical findings. Overall, symbols in the paintings are less important than the relationships they represent. Various paintings done by different children are presented and discussed. The paintings are at times discussed as points of reference that represent certain stages of the therapeutic relationship. The program discusses and illustrates pictorially how children represent their own bodies, and their relationships with their mothers, with others, and with the outside world. The program discusses the use of free-expression painting with the following children: an eight-year-old boy who has morbid fears and anxieties about being abandoned; a seven-and-a-half-year-old girl who is intellectually mature but who sees herself as a child of four or five; a ten-year-old who is excessively dependent on her mother; an eleven-year-old girl who is uncommunicative after sexual trauma; and a schizophrenic child.
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88.
Title: From ten to twelve
Date: 1957
Run Time: 26 min.
Names: Roberts, C. A.; Crawley Films; Mental Health Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada
Abstract: This film examines the range of behaviors, interests, and physical and psychological development amongst boy and girls in the 10 to 12-year age range. It looks at the extent of interest in the opposite gender, attitudes toward parents, and how these pre-teens fit themselves into social groupings. The film notes that girls mature earlier and are usually academically ahead of boys at this stage, by as much as a year. It presents a case study of a family in which one son has a problem -- he argued with a referee during a sports match and may be kicked off the team -- and how the parents handle that problem.
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89.
Title: Gesell developmental and neurologic examination
Date: 1964
Run Time: 27 min.
Names: Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Ohio State University, Child Development Service
Abstract: This film describes and demonstrates the Gesell developmental and neurologic examination, using clinical subjects, structural models, and various toys. According to this presentation, key ages provide dramatic views of infant development and foreshadow future development. Immature patterns are shown and discussed and the child's behavioral responses are analyzed and described. The first child is shown at 16 weeks. Various objects such as a dangling ring, rattle, and bell are placed in front of him, and his actions and reactions are described. The program considers his posture, eye movements, coordination, arm movements, leg movements, visual perception, gross and fine motor movements, auditory perception, and social behavior. The program notes that looking, reaching, contacting, grasping, and manipulating constitute a developmental sequence. Children are shown at 28 weeks, 40 weeks, and 52 weeks.
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90.
Title: Getting ready emotionally/a Coronet film
Date: 1951
Run Time: 11 min.
Names: Coronet Instructional Films; National Education Association of the United States
Abstract: This film is part of the series "Are you ready for service?" It helps young men and their parents understand the emotional problems often encountered in military service and the attitudinal changes that can be helpful.
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91.
Title: Grief, a peril in infancy
Date: 1947
Run Time: 24 min.
Names: Psychoanalytic Research Project on Problems of Infancy; Spitz, René A.; Wolf, Katherine M.
Abstract: This film shows the effect upon infants of prolonged absence of the mother. A number of babies in a foundling home are shown. The film indicates that among infants under a year old, if the mother returns after an interval of fewer than three months, their recovery is rapid. If the absence is prolonged beyond this period, it becomes impossible to achieve contact with them, and they become passive and apathetic and begin to suffer damage to their personalities. The film suggests that it is the emotional climate provided by the mother that allows the child's mind to develop normally.
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92.
Title: Group studies, social psychiatry
Date: 1966
Run Time: 21 min.
Names: Lindemann, Erich; Mason, Edward A.; Harvard Medical School, Mental Health Training Film Program
Abstract: Emphasizing the importance of the study of social systems, institutional and social structure, and the concept of role, Dr. Lindemann mentions a range of group studies that have contributed to the development of the field of social and community psychiatry. He speaks of the importance of group structure and cultural context in relation to child-rearing practices, personality development, and mental illness. Relating the concepts derived from the studies to the programs they have influenced, he underlines the opportunities for psychiatry in the community.
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93.
Title: Group therapy: a model for staff development
Date: 1967
Run Time: 60 min.
Names: Brown, John; Gunn, Walter; Allan King Associates; Brown Camps Ltd.; Brown Camps Residential Treatment Centre; Canadian Education Programs
Abstract: This program presents a group therapy session among staff members of the Brown Camps for emotionally-disturbed children. During the session the therapist tries to help each person express his own feelings while also being aware of the concerns of others. There is no quick resolution of problems, but there are insights made that can be applied to staff members' daily lives, their work with the children, and their future growth in therapy situations. At the camp the group meets twice a week with a senior staff member, in this case, John Brown, the executive director of the camp. The group session begins with a discussion of the members' reactions to the filming crew and the fact that they will be filmed while sharing intimate feelings. John Brown has just returned after being away and members of the group explore their feelings about his absence. During the session the following subjects and the feelings they evoke are explored: a member who is ill with phlebitis and fears being rejected by the group, two males vying for the attention of one female, one male member having difficulty relating to a particular female member, and one female's reaction to the loss of her mother and the group's efforts to try to help her.
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94.
Title: Handle with care
Date: 1965?
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Pearson, Paul H.
Abstract: The program demonstrates and stresses the importance of a central agency in the community to assist families in coping with the problem of mental retardation. The program achieves its objective primarily through the use of brief descriptions of cases of specific individuals and the services they received in Los Angeles. The program includes cases of mentally retarded infants, children, and young adults. The program discusses their mental, physical, social, and economic needs. The program also discusses how social workers, hearing and speech therapists, nurses, educational specialists, religious groups, and sheltered workshops help these individuals and their families meet their needs.
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95.
Title: Hands: psychiatric occupational therapy
Date: 1960
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Nebraska Psychiatric Institute; University of Nebraska, College of Medicine
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to illustrate treatment of a schizophrenic patient through occupational therapy. This is achieved through a "case history in clay" of Jane, a 27-year-old schizophrenic woman. The program focuses primarily on her 18-month hospital stay. Jane shows characteristic schizophrenic behavior such as unpredictable actions, refusal to speak, and distortions in perception. Particular emphasis is given to the patient's use of clay to vent anger and represent feelings about herself. Discussions between the therapist and psychiatrist are illustrated with conjectures on Jane's progress as observed through changes in the clay figures she has made. The program concludes with Jane responding positively to the therapist's reassurance and offers to help, as shown by improved behavior and willingness to return to her job and home life.
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96.
Title: Help wanted
Date: 1961?
Run Time: 26 min.
Names: Martin, Harold R.; Nebraska Psychiatric Institute, University of Nebraska College of Medicine
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the importance of including the rehabilitation counselor as part of the team in the total rehabilitation of the mental patient. This objective is achieved with the aid of clinical subjects, drawings, and animation. The program stresses that patients have different problems, and each must be helped according to individual abilities and limitations. Joyce, a 24-year-old schizophrenic patient, is shown applying for a job. When her past mental illness is disclosed, she is not hired, and becomes depressed and discouraged. The work of the rehabilitation counselor is then depicted. He discusses Joyce's preferences regarding employment, determines her aptitude for positions, her interests and abilities, and discusses these with other members of the team. A school is found in which she can take a refresher course while still hospitalized, and with the aid of the counselor begins to rebuild her self-confidence. The program then focuses on Mike, a 63-year-old male with acute depression, who is also a diabetic. He is sent to a pre-vocational work evaluation program to determine what type of work would best suit his physical and mental capabilities. The findings of this evaluation are discussed with the patient. Since the patient lives almost 200 miles from the hospital, the counselor paves the way for the patient to begin adjusting to a new counselor, who will work with him after his return home. The role of the State Office of Vocational Rehabilitation is described briefly as the two counselors meet and discuss the patient.
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97.
Title: Heredity and pre-natal development
Date: 1950
Run Time: 21 min.
Names: McGraw-Hill Text-Films (New York, N.Y.)
Abstract: This film explains the role of chromosomes and genes in determining sex and transmitting potential physical and mental characteristics to offspring; describes fertilization of the ovum by the sperm cell; and traces development of the fetus until delivery. The film also stresses the close connection between physical and emotional sensitivity in very young children.
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98.
Title: Hermaphrodite
Date: 1969
Run Time: 16 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation consists of "telexamples," televised excerpts from a one-hour interview conducted by a medical student. The case presented is a hermaphrodite patient. The presentation illustrates behavior characteristics of a hermaphrodite as well as interview techniques used to draw out the feelings and impressions of the patient. The patient illustrated in this presentation is a man named "Lizzie" who displays gender confusion and verbalizes his uncertainty about himself. The patient describes family attitudes and sexual experiences which have contributed to his confusion. The discussion is largely focused on the patient's early life and how it affected his behavior and his current feelings.
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99.
Title: High wall
Date: 1952
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: Greenson, Ralph R.; Illinois Dept. of Mental Health; Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith; Columbia Foundation; Illinois Office of Public Instruction
Abstract: This film explores the development of prejudice in “everyday" people, some of the ways it is communicated to children, and the kind of home life -- rigid, restricted, demanding, and cold -- which research has found most likely to foster these attitudes. It provides a case study of a frustrated, insecure boy whose home life has allowed him no freedom to develop as a normal person, but has instead conditioned him to hate anyone or any group different from him or his group. His situation reaches a crisis point when he is hurt in a teenage gang fight on Chicago's South Side, precipitated by anti-Polish sentiment.
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100.
Title: Homefires
Date: 1963
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Mental Health Film Board (New York, N.Y.); National Council for Homemaker Services; U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Education, Division of Adult and Vocational Research
Abstract: The Homemaker Service provides physical assistance to families and individuals in their own homes. The camera follows one homemaker as she cares for the families assigned to her. She is shown as she shops, prepares meals, and does light housework for an elderly couple who would otherwise be unable to live on their own. The homemaker works under the supervision of a public health nurse. When a Puerto Rican mother of six is injured, the homemaker looks after the children and helps with the housework as the mother recuperates. Because the mother is unfamiliar with some American ways and is not well-educated, the homemaker teaches her how to use household equipment, how to budget household money, and how to plan nutritionally balanced meals. As the homemaker helps to care for a third, more affluent family, she becomes aware of the strain they are under because of the mother’s hospitalization for depression and the father’s negative attitude toward the mother. She calls for expert help in this situation. The homemaker is also shown attending an in-service training session. The film emphasizes that the women who staff the Homemaker Service are, for the most part, women who have raised families and taken care of homes of their own.
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101.
Title: Horizon House
Date: 1969
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Horizon House; Rutman, Irvin D.; WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.)
Abstract: This film depicts the work of the staff and residents of Horizon House, a community-based mental health facility in Philadelphia. The program features clinical subjects, staff, and residents, and stresses the importance of community involvement in planning and meeting the needs of all. The challenges facing the patient about to be discharged from a mental hospital are discussed, including housing, employment, and loneliness. The planning done today is compared and contrasted with that of fifteen years ago. The program focuses on the establishment of Horizon House, first founded as a social club. Horizon later added rehabilitation services, residential services, social casework, and sheltered workshops. In a recent innovation it became associated with the Jefferson County Community Medical Center as a community mental health facility, with links to other health and welfare resources in the area. The program then focuses on the work of the Horizon House teams, comprised of professional and nonprofessional staff members and community members. These teams make home visits to patients and are concerned with housing, money, food, clothing and friends, and assistance in problem solving.
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102.
Title: Horla
Date: 196-?
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: Maupassant, Guy de; Sandoz Pharmaceuticals
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to illustrate, in narrative form, the behavior patterns of a young man who develops a psychosis that eventually leads to suicide. The program deals with the man's thoughts and reactions to changes that are occurring in his life, portraying a man who thinks he is going insane and subsequently records his thoughts and feelings in diary form. The types of feelings and behavior changes illustrated include insomnia, depression, exhaustion, feelings of being possessed, and feelings of leading a double life. The young man gives these feelings an identity, calling them Horla. At the end of the presentation he decides that suicide is the only method of escape from the Horla. The name "Horla" derives from an 1887 short story of that name by Guy de Maupassant.
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103.
Title: Hospitalized person
Date: 1970
Run Time: 25 min.
Names: Concept Media
Abstract: This program focuses primarily on the anxieties and apprehensions that can result from an illness and period of hospitalization. Psychological effects of such lengthy illness include the tendency to become egocentric, demanding, and dependent, and to use regression as a coping mechanism. Also discussed are the effects of pain and the failure to improve on the individual's anxiety level. The effects of hospitalization, depersonalization, dependency, and loneliness are explored. The essentially passive role of the patient and its effect on an individual is also discussed, along with the importance of recognizing the individual as a unique and worthwhile person. Behavioral reactions to anxiety are discussed, including hostility, resentment, and uncooperativeness.
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104.
Title: How behavior grows: (the patterning of prone progression)
Date: 1946
Run Time: 16 min.
Names: Yale Clinic of Child Development ; Gesell, Arnold; Encyclopaedia Britannica Films
Abstract: This film was produced at the Yale Clinic of Child Development and directed by Arnold Gesell, M.D. It is compiled of footage shot over a 20-year period. In the film, the developmental task of learning to walk is studied and documented at 23 defined stages. Infants from the ages of one week to 18 months are shown exhibiting motor abilities that Gesell contends are characteristic of the ability to walk upright. Development progresses from cephalo to caudal, and proximal to distal. The infants are shown, usually alone, lying prone on a light-colored mat. In some sequences an attendant appears wearing a lab coat. Most sequences are shot from slightly above or directly above the prone child. Some sequences show the babies on a mat that has been marked with concentric circles so the viewer can easily measure the distance the child moves.
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105.
Title: Hysterical neurosis, dissociative type
Date: 1969
Run Time: 10 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation consists of televised excerpts or "telexamples" of an interview between a psychiatrist and a patient with a hysterical neurosis. The program aims to show characteristic forms of behavior that accompany this type of neurosis. The case presented is a middle-aged male who exhibits a fugue state during which abnormal aggressive behavior occurs. The patient describes this form of hysteria as one where he loses emotional control and even injures people. The patient also notes that on one occasion, this state followed a period of drinking. As discussed in the presentation, the history of the patient's neurosis dates back to 1943.
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106.
Title: Inner world of aphasia
Date: 1968
Run Time: 24 min.
Names: Pearson, Leonard; Edward Feil Productions
Abstract: This program is a narrative example of the adjustment and treatment of two aphasic patients. Its purpose is to depict the frustrations and communication difficulties that accompany this condition. The program begins by illustrating the case of a nurse who, through an accident, acquires global aphasia accompanied by hemianopia. She displays depressive behavior and an unwillingness to undergo treatment. The second case illustrates a young father with aphasia who shows an earnest effort for rehabilitation but responds poorly due to lack of understanding from his family. As a method of rehabilitation, these two patients are placed in therapy sessions for improving mechanical skills, speech, and comprehension. Initially, they are doubtful and unwilling, but eventually there is some improvement. Group therapy serves as an additional method for patients to help one another overcome the frustrations of aphasia.
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107.
Title: Inside story
Date: 1944
Run Time: 26 min.
Names: Paramount Pictures; U.S. Navy; U.S. Coast Guard
Abstract: This film outlines the most common emotional illnesses that a person might suffer upon entering a military service and suggests how the individual serviceman can deal with them. Anxiety can be caused by isolation from family and familiar circumstances, the pressures of military training, lack of privacy in barracks life, and worry about performing one's duty. Footage of a sailor in the above situations is shown. A Navy psychiatrist reassures a troubled seaman, helps him to understand what is happening to him, and gives him material to read that will guide him in his recovery. The seaman shares his reading material and his new self-knowledge with his buddies. They too suffer in greater or lesser degree from some of the effects of anxiety. Animation is used to illustrate the workings of the unconscious mind.
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108.
Title: Introduction to clinical neurology
Date: 1938
Run Time: 47 min.
Names: Reichard, J. D.; Wortis, S. Bernard; United States Public Health Service, Federal Security Agency; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: There are four parts to this film. Part I shows a general neurological examination and clinical signs of disorders of the pyramidal system; Part II, disorders of the extrapyramidal system and the posterior columns; Part III, cerebellar disorders involving the lower motor neurons and convulsive states, and Part IV, functional syndromes with physical symptoms. At the beginning of each section, the affected part of the nervous system is pointed out on casts or schematic diagrams. The patients are male, nude to the waist, and wearing pajama bottoms rolled up above their knees to display their gait or lower limb involvement. Some of the attendants (all male) are wearing Public Health Service uniforms. This film was shot at the U.S. Marine Hospital, Neuropsychiatric Service, Ellis Island, N.Y.
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109.
Title: Introduction to combat fatigue
Date: 1944
Run Time: 31 min.
Names: U.S. Navy, Bureau of Aeronautics
Abstract: This formerly restricted film was intended to be shown to patients suffering from combat fatigue. A medical officer/narrator explains the nature of fear and how it helps the body and mind cope with threatening situations. Profiling a soldier named Edwards, the narrator explains how combat fatigue begins, grows, and finally incapacitates the soldier. Aboard a ship headed for the combat zone, Edwards feels excitement and tension. In the combat zone, he behaves as expected -- he leaves his ship, wades ashore, penetrates a jungle area, and fires at the enemy. He is afraid but not cowardly. His fear keeps him alert and ready. During a lull in the battle, the fear abates. This is normal. During a prolonged period of relative inactivity, dug in in the jungle, Edwards becomes grouchy, nervous, and impatient. He and the other troops are in a constant state of alert. Edwards finally snaps during a patrol when his buddy, walking five paces in front of him, is killed. The narrator explains that Edwards has reached his own breaking point and is overcome with fear. From this point on, his behavior reflects his illness. He is irritable and critical. He becomes hostile and irrational. He suffers from loss of appetite and vomits what he does eat. He cannot sleep. When the immediate cause of fear is absent, Edwards is still afraid. Even when he is on leave, he is afraid. He cannot forget. The narrator reassures the viewer that Edwards will get well under the Navy's treatment program, and he will learn that fear is the fighting man's friend once he learns to "run" his fear and not let it "run" him. Shots include: A cat reacting with fear to the presence of a dog, combat scenes in a jungle setting, firefights, day and night patrols, a night watch in a foxhole, and an aerial attack on a camp.
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110.
Title: Invisible barrier: a contribution from Japan to the problem of rehabilitating psychiatric patients
Date: 1968
Run Time: 32 min.
Names: Sandoz Film Library, Sandoz Pharmaceuticals
Abstract: This film, made in Japan, affirms that advances in pharmacological agents have transformed psychiatric treatment, but that the help of families and communities remains essential. The story is told from the perspective of a psychiatric social worker based near Tokyo who is trying to help two patients at a local mental health facility, both of whom are ready for release, return to their family homes. In both cases, the families are reluctant to receive the patients because of concerns about behavior and the effect on other members of the family. Voice-over narration is in English; patients speak in Japanese. Captions/titles are in Japanese.
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111.
Title: Involuntary hospitalization of the psychiatric patient: should it be abolished?
Date: 1969
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Masserman, Jules Hymen; Szasz, Thomas Stephen; Visotsky, Harold M.; U.S. Public Health Service; National Medical Audiovisual Center
Abstract: This film presents a panel discussion between Jules H. Masserman, M.D., Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry, Northwestern University Medical School, and Thomas S. Szasz, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, State University of New York. Harold Visotsky, M.D., Chairman, Department of Psychiatry at Northwestern University Medical School, acts as moderator. Dr. Masserman contends that there are certain clinical situations in which an individual must be hospitalized for psychiatric reasons against his will, whereas Dr. Szasz contends that psychiatry must be practiced on a purely contractual basis with the patient.
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112.
Title: John: aged 17 months: for nine days in a residential nursery
Date: 1969
Run Time: 44 min.
Names: Tavistock Institute of Human Relations; New York University Film Library
Abstract: This film is about a 17-month-old child who is put in a nursery for ten days while his mother goes to the hospital. It shows a normal boy who gradually goes to pieces over this experience, demonstrating the effect of trauma. The boy experiences gradual ego regression and destruction as a result of emotional despair; in effect, he has a complete personality change.
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113.
Title: Le Monde du schizophréne / Sandoz Pharmaceuticals
Date: 196-?
Run Time: 21 min.
Names: Sandoz Pharmaceuticals; Duché; Didier-Jacques; Sciencefilm
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to present sensory images characteristic of a person afflicted with schizophrenia. A young man who exhibits schizophrenic behavior is profiled. The program presents this case with no dialogue; it is simply an illustration of his actions and thoughts. The specific senses reviewed include sight, sound, and touch. This program is concerned primarily with the schizophrenic's distorted perception of his surrounding environment. Special effects have been used to create the sensory images of a schizophrenic. The intention of this program is to provide insight into the actual personality and perceptions of schizophrenics, in pursuit of further understanding.
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114.
Title: Let there be light
Date: 1946
Run Time: 57 min.
Names: U.S. Army; Huston, John
Abstract: About 20 percent of all battle casualties in the American army during World War II were of a neuropsychiatric nature. This film shows how these casualties were treated by techniques of hypnosis and narcosynthesis. "No scenes were staged. The cameras merely recorded what took place in an Army Hospital." The film begins with footage of troops returning home aboard a ship. The psychiatric casualties are shown arriving at a hospital, being greeted as a group, then interviewed singly by psychotherapists. The therapists elicit recall of events that brought on the neuroses. A psychiatrist is shown treating a case of amnesia using hypnosis. The patient is hypnotized, and the therapist has him recall events on Okinawa preceding his illness. A case of stuttering caused by battle tension is treated by drug therapy to induce relaxation and recall of events preceding the problem. A soldier who suddenly finds himself unable to walk is given an injection of sodium amytal. While under the influence of the drug, the psychiatrist attempts to bring to the patient’s conscious mind the emotional conflict causing his illness. Shortly, the patient is able to get up and walk. A psychiatrist conducts a group therapy session with the patients in which civilian and family attitudes toward the recovering mentally ill soldier are discussed. Knowledge of self and feelings of safety are emphasized. Patients are shown improving as they engage in activities such as ballplaying, music, carpentry, and religious services.
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115.
Title: Life begins
Date: 1939
Run Time: 31 min.
Names: Gesell, Arnold; Yale Clinic of Child Development
Abstract: The first segment of this film is titled "A Baby’s Day at Twelve Weeks." Over footage of a 12-week-old baby and his mother, Arnold Gesell of the Yale Clinic of Child Development explains the developmental importance of each aspect of the baby’s day, which begins as he wakes, stretches, and yawns. His yawn sends extra oxygen to his brain. Stretching makes his heart beat more strongly. He recognizes his mother and nurses at her breast. He naps in his crib. Gesell says babies show their individuality even in the way they sleep and wake up. The baby is given an "air" bath in a warm, sunny place, then placed in water and allowed to sit and get used to it. Objects are placed in the water so that he can exercise his depth perception. Sleep, food, and play make up the baby’s day. The second part of the film, titled "Learning and Growth," shows babies at 24 to 36 weeks with still-dominant arm-waving patterns, unable to play patty-cake. At 40 weeks this ability can be seen, and at 44 weeks the baby is quite good at it. In the third film segment, titled "Social Behavior," babies from 8 to 44 weeks show increasingly social behavior with their parents, siblings, and strangers. Gesell speaks into the camera at the end of the film about infant growth and individuality.
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116.
Title: Life begins again
Date: 1943
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Paul Rotha Productions; British Information Services
Abstract: This film describes methods of rehabilitating injured men. It shows the medical treatment, exercise, and mental hygiene through which the injured men regain their self-confidence and are restored to health.
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117.
Title: Long-range problems of the postmenopausal woman
Date: 1969
Run Time: 43 min.
Names: Barnes, Allan C.; Gordan, Gilbert S.; Kantor, Herman I.; Ayerst Laboratories
Abstract: This program presents a national symposium on the long-range effects of estrogen replacement. Three physicians present their views on the subject. Clinical examples and charts are used to illustrate certain points. Dr. Barnes briefly discusses the physiology of menopause, and its associated signs and symptoms. He argues that post-menopause is a deficiency state; a major hormonal component has been lost and must be compensated for, as in any other diseased state. He is certain of the benefits of estrogen replacement and feels there is no proven relationship between cancer and the administration of estrogen. Dr. Kantor primarily discusses the mental and emotional problems associated with ovarian deprivation. He discusses the results of a study involving administration of estrogen to women age 80 and over to determine whether estrogen slows or stops the process of aging as evidenced by its effect on the individual's personality, and to determine the appropriate dosage for women in this age group. Dr. Gordon discusses osteoporosis, its incidence in the elderly, radiographic and clinical findings associated with it, the use of estrogen replacement therapy as a preventive medical practice, and the side effects of this type of treatment.
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118.
Title: Magic mirror of Aloyse: the artistic work of a schizophrenic patient
Date: 1964
Run Time: 23 min.
Names: Bader, Alfred; Center for the Study of Plastic Expression, Psychiatric Clinic, University of Lausanne (Switzerland); Center for Mass Communication, Columbia University Press (New York, N.Y.)
Abstract: This film explores a half-century of a schizophrenic’s artistic productivity for its psychiatric interest and intrinsic merit. The film portrays the various phases of the work of a patient, Aloyse, correlating them with the progression of her mental disorder. Scenes include original footage of Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, Aloyse's pencil drawings and paintings, and Aloyse at work and eating with other patients in an institution. Her paintings, which often portray the symbolic imagery of physical love and include great figures of history, are also shown hanging in a museum. Shot in Lausanne, Switzerland.
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119.
Title: Man to man
Date: 1954
Run Time: 31 min.
Names: Appel, Kenneth E.; Green, William F.; Rennie, Thomas A. C.; Affiliated Film Production; Fairfield State Hospital (Newton, Ct.); Mental Health Film Board (New York, N.Y.)
Abstract: Warm sympathy and human understanding are powerful instruments in helping mental health patients; this is the inherent message of this film. This documentary is focused primarily on the relationship between two people: an elderly man who cannot feed himself and will not respond when approached, and a psychiatric aide (attendant) who refused to be discouraged even though help for the patient seems hopeless. Genuine suspense is achieved as the aide, with infinite patience and honest compassion, wins the confidence of the patient. The team approach of the hospital staff and glimpses of ward life and hospital routine are shown. The importance of the aide in hospital treatment is emphasized. Film shot at Fairfield State Hospital, Newton, Connecticut.
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120.
Title: Manic-depressive illness, manic type
Date: 1969
Run Time: 4 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This presentation consists of televised excerpts ("telexamples") of an interview between a psychiatrist and a patient who exhibits behaviors typical of the manic phase of manic-depressive illness. The case illustrated shows a middle-aged female with manic behavior manifested by accelerated speech, loose associations, flight of ideas, and excessive somatic concern. The patient appears somewhat disheveled and unkempt. The patient does not respond to most of the questioning, except to say that she wants to "get well and go home." After several attempts at questioning from the interviewer, the patient discusses her childhood relationship with her mother. She also mentions her previous shock therapy treatment.
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121.
Title: Marijuana
Date: 1968
Run Time: 33 min.
Names: Bloomquist, Edward R.; Bono, Sonny; Avanti Films; Bailey Films
Abstract: Sonny Bono explores the reasons often given to justify use of marijuana and other drugs. This program includes dramatized presentation of fact and opinion designed to provoke discussion, but leaves decisions to viewers. The film encourages viewers to consider the ill effects of alcohol or cigarettes vs. marijuana, whether or not marijuana is addictive, whether it leads to use of harder drugs, and other topics.
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122.
Title: Maternal deprivation in young children
Date: 1951?
Run Time: 25 min.
Names: Roudinesco, Jenny; Appell, Geneviéve; Institut national d'hygiéne, Centre international de l'enfance (France)
Abstract: This film is part of the data collected by a French research unit studying the effect of maternal deprivation in young children between one and two-and-a-half-years old. All had been reared in institutions without the opportunity for a stable and intimate relationship with one primary caregiver. All had been moved from one institution to another several times. For most of these children, the capacity for human relationships was seriously impaired. The first portion of the film shows some of the disorders that appear in these children; the second shows the progress of children under psychotherapy.
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123.
Title: Measurement of depression
Date: 196-?
Run Time: 22 min.
Names: Zung, William W. K.; Lakeside Laboratories; Sturgis Grant Productions
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to demonstrate Dr. William Zung's method, developed at Duke University, for measuring depression by means of a written test. In this program, five patients who demonstrate the majority of symptoms indicative of depression are profiled. These symptoms include pervasive affect, and physiological and psychological changes identified by researchers as representative of depression. The program then describes how Dr. Zung selected and used 20 of the most characteristic symptoms of depression in the development of a test consisting of short questions and answers phrased in nontechnical terminology. The answers provided graded measures of the particular symptoms discussed in the question. The program also describes a comparison of this test with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. The film indicated that studies have found that the Zung test, referred to as the SDS Index, is as reliable but much easier to administer and evaluate.
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124.
Title: Mental health: keeping mentally fit
Date: 1952
Run Time: 10 min.
Names:
Abstract: This film promotes the importance of staying mentally healthy by expressing one's emotions rather than bottling them up, respecting one's own abilities and not being excessively self-critical, and showing respect and support for others, particularly parents toward children. The film emphasizes that mental stress can cause physical symptoms, and that mental health is important to overall good health. Talking to others who might be able to help solve a problem is also emphasized.
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125.
Title: Mental status examination
Date: 1962
Run Time: 34 min.
Names: National Institute of Mental Health
Abstract: This program and its accompanying booklet present a basic outline for the collection and organization of examination data based on current psychiatric concepts. The program uses a case study with a discussion of the mental status of the individual presented. It begins with a comparison of features of physical and mental examinations. The program then presents an interview with a psychiatrist and a 45-year-old man who cannot work as a result of back and leg pain. First, the film presents the examination itself, followed by a discussion of the outline of the mental status examination. The outline is organized according to four general areas: behavior and appearance, intellectual processes, emotions and perceptions, and reactions to the patient. The information obtained from the patient is classified to facilitate an understanding of the examination process. The program concludes with a list of references for additional information on the mental status of patients.
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126.
Title: Metrazol, electric, and insulin treatment of the functional psychoses
Date: 1934
Run Time: 45 min.
Names: Central Islip State Hospital
Abstract: This film shows convulsive therapy of psychotic patients using metrazol and insulin, and metrazol and electroshock. Treatment and behavior presented include: set-ups, injections, electroshock, convulsions, coma, artificial respiration, twitching, glucose intake, and recovery. It also shows dosages and times. Twice, six patients in one room were injected at the same time and watched for convulsions and differences in reactions. Patients include a paranoid schizophrenic with depression, one with catatonic dementia praecox, another with paranoid dementia praecox, and others. The film makes the statement that insulin is effective in all forms of schizophrenia. This film was shot at Central Islip State Hospital.
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127.
Title: Mother infant interaction: form of feeding at six weeks
Date: 1967
Run Time: 48 min.
Names: Axelrad, Sidney; Brody, Sylvia; Film-Rite, Inc.; New York University Film Library; Infant Development Research Project
Abstract: This is the first installment in a series about the behavioral and emotional interaction between mothers and infants in the first year of life. In a study of these relationships, more than 100 mother-infant pairs were observed clinically, and the feeding of each infant by the mother was filmed at intervals during the year. Seven types of maternal behavior with infants are shown.
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128.
Title: Motility in parent-child relationships
Date: 195-
Run Time: 33 min.
Names: Mittelmann, Béla; Malkenson, Laura; Munroe, Ruth Learned
Abstract: This second film in Dr. Béla Mittelmann's series on motility is focused on its important role in the development of interpersonal relationships in the first 18 months of life. The main theme of this film is reciprocity between parent and child involving modes of motility. The newborn infant's motility, at first random activity or reactions to distress, soon includes vigorous manifestations of pleasure. These merge into aggressive behavior and are related to the development of adaptive patterns of locomotion and manipulation. The film shows how the parent's active response to the baby’s motor behavior results in social exchange.
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129.
Title: N.P. patient
Date: 1944
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: U. S. Navy, Bureau of Aeronautics
Abstract: This film illustrates how to care for and handle neuropsychiatric patients. Typical cases include combat fatigue, catatonia, suicide, and psychopathy. Their treatment includes hydrotherapy, blanket-wrap treatment, electroshock, and occupational therapy. Corpsmen's importance in patients' recovery is also emphasized. An isolation "strong" room is shown.
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130.
Title: Narcosynthesis
Date: 1944
Run Time: 10 min.
Names: Bennett, Abram Elting; Wilbur, C. B.; Department of Psychiatry, Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital (Omaha, Neb.)
Abstract: Under light narcosis produced by ultra-short-acting barbiturates, patients re-experience emotions associated with psychic trauma and become more amenable to suggestion. The four examples are: 1) the effect of simple suggestion in choreic movements; 2) the effect of reassurance and suggestion in hysteria with hemiporesis; 3) the production of emotional responsiveness in a schizophrenic-like state; and 4) a severe case of major hysteria in an 11-year-old girl.
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131.
Title: Narcotics, why not
Date: 1966
Run Time: 14 min.
Names: Charles Cahill and Associates
Abstract: This film presents a series of extemporaneous interviews with teenagers and young adults who have taken narcotics for "kicks," “association," or "curiosity." Residents of the California Rehabilitation Center relate how they were introduced to narcotics, why they wished they had not used drugs or narcotics, and what the future holds for them. Film is shot in Hollywood, Calif.
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132.
Title: Neurosis and alcohol: an experimental study
Date: 1944
Run Time: 23 min.
Names: Masserman, Jules Hymen; Yum, K. S.; University of Chicago Psychobiologic Laboratories; Otho S.A. Sprague Memorial Institute (Chicago, Ill.); Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows experiments demonstrating the effects of alcohol on normal and neurotic cats in an attempt to show analogous effects in humans. Cats are trained to lift the lid of a box for food, then to feed only at a bell-light signal, and finally to press a switch to activate feeding signals. Alcohol is administered, and the patterns disappear in the order of recency and decreasing complexity of integration, until only primitive feeding reactions remain. In another experiment, animals are made neurotic by severe motivational conflict. When cats are fed milk containing alcohol, complex neurotic patterns are temporarily alleviated. Some animals then prefer alcoholic milk to non-alcoholic milk until cured by relief of an underlying neurosis.
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133.
Title: NIMH-NIH Nobel award celebration November 3, 1970: honoring Julius Axelrod, Ph.D., co-winner of the 1970 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine
Date: 1970
Run Time: 35 min.
Names: Axelrod, Julius; Berliner, Robert; Brown, Bertram; Cohen, Robert; Eberhardt, John; U.S. National Institute of Mental Health
Abstract: This film records a tribute to Dr. Julius Axelrod for winning the 1970 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (the prize was shared with Dr. Bernard Katz and Dr. Ulfvon Euler). Dr. John Eberhardt, director of National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Intramural Research, is the master of ceremonies. He comments on the Nobel Prize, and discusses the history of the NIMH. He introduces several people on the stage, then introduces Dr. Bertram Brown, director of NIMH. Dr. Robert Berliner reflects on his relationship with Dr. Axelrod. Dr. Robert Cohen describes Dr. Axelrod's research on how the body metabolizes LSD and adrenaline, and then introduces Dr. Axelrod, who thanks his colleagues.
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134.
Title: No real pathology
Date: 1961
Run Time: 19 min.
Names: Dunlop, Edwin; Upjohn Company; Teletalent
Abstract: A physician, Dr. Edwin Dunlop, lectures on depression and anxiety. He emphasizes the importance of determining whether the patient's major problem is depression, which can be treated with "psychic energizers," or anxiety, which can be treated with tranquilizers. Asking the patient six simple questions may produce sufficient information for a diagnosis. Patients are shown responding to these questions: How well do you enjoy life? How well do you concentrate? How well do you sleep? How is your appetite? How do you feel about facing the day? Do you have vague physical symptoms? Depressed patients are shown answering most of these questions negatively. Dunlop discusses the symptoms of depression evident in their answers and tone of voice. The effect of tranquilizers on a depressed patient is discussed. A patient suffering from anxiety is also shown answering some of the six questions. Her responses differ significantly from the answers of depressed patients.
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135.
Title: Normal development of behavior: key age, forty weeks: key age, twelve months
Date: 1941
Run Time: 10 min.
Names: Gesell, Arnold; Yale Clinic of Child Development
Abstract: Normal behavioral development of the human infant is illustrated in this film from the Yale Clinic of Child Development, Arnold Gesell, M.D., Director. The subject is a baby girl shown at 40 weeks and again at 12 months. At 40 weeks, the child picks up, pounds, and mouths cubes, keeping one in each hand. When she is given a pellet, she cannot pick it up with her thumb and forefinger, nor can she put the pellet into a bottle. She stands shakily when held in a standing position. When she is placed in a prone position, she cannot move toward an object placed far in front of her. When the object is moved around her, she rotates on her abdomen to follow it. At age 12 months, the same baby picks up one cube at a time and puts it down again, stacks one cube on top of another, puts cubes into a cup one at a time and similarly takes them out again. She picks up a pellet with her thumb and forefinger, and uses a string to pull a bell and ring toward her. When a ball is rolled toward her, she catches it and tries to roll it back. She awkwardly moves from a sitting position to a creeping position in an attempt to get to a ball placed far in front of her. She stands fairly well with little support. She walks hesitantly when both her hands are held. She holds onto a crib rail and pulls herself from a sitting to a standing position. Still holding onto the crib rail, she walks sideways.
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136.
Title: Normal development of behavior: key age, sixteen weeks: key age, twenty-eight weeks
Date: 1941
Run Time: 9 min.
Names: Gesell, Arnold; Yale Clinic of Child Development
Abstract: This film illustrates the normal behavioral development of two infants, one at 16 weeks of age and one at 28 weeks of age. The 16-week-old baby is shown lying on her back in a crib, kicking her legs and waving her arms. When a large ring is dangled above her, she waves her arms but does not grasp the ring. When a rattle is placed in her hand, she clumsily waves it and mouths it. She does not turn her head when bells are rung on either side of her head. When pulled to a sitting position, she can't maintain her balance. When she is tied into a supporting chair and has a cube placed in front of her, she ignores it. When a block is placed in her hand, she drops it. She ignores a pellet placed by her hand. When she is given a cup, she touches it but does not pick it up. When she is held in a standing position, her legs will not support her. When placed in a prone position, she wiggles but makes no forward progress. A 28-week-old baby, tied into a supporting chair, is given a series of objects--a cube, several cubes at once, a pellet, a cup, and a bell. She picks them up, mouths them, and bangs two cubes together. When a ring attached to a string is placed in front of her, she cannot yet pull the string to bring the ring into her grasp. She sits alone rather shakily and reaches for a toy held in front of her. When she is placed in a prone position, she turns her head and body from side to side to follow a ringing bell. Her legs begin to make the movements which will lead to creeping.
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137.
Title: Nurse's day with the mentally ill
Date: 1943
Run Time: 15 min.
Names: Hargrove, Eugene Alexander; Bennett, Abram Elting; Eaton, June; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows the typical activities of a nurse in a psychiatric hospital, demonstrating reassuring and supporting roles, and illustrating nursing care in shock therapies. Scenes include catatonic patients, administration of shock therapy, patients eating in a communal dining room, patients sewing, weaving, painting, woodworking with large electric saws, boxing, picnicking, playing chess and checkers, listening to the radio, and dancing.
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138.
Title: Observations concerning the phenomenology of early oral behavior
Date: 1951
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Escalona, Sibylle K.; Menninger Foundation, Research Dept.; New York University Film Library
Abstract: This film provides a descriptive documentation of variations in oral behavior in infants under 24 weeks of age. Infants are shown at different ages, moving their arms and legs, placing fingers, toes, and other objects in their mouths, licking items, grabbing a ring suspended above them, and biting a sterling silver cup. Behavior prior to feeding and after feeding is shown, with variations in infant response. The film shows that the degree of differentiation in mouth movements depends on neuromuscular maturation, different kinds of oral behavior, and individual modifications, which are a reflection of "feeling states." The film is intended for professional persons interested in developmental psychology and also as a teaching aid for students engaged in behavior observations.
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139.
Title: Obsessive-compulsive personality
Date: 1969
Run Time: 21 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" (televised segment) consists of excerpts from two interviews between a psychiatrist and a patient with an obsessive-compulsive personality. The case shown is a young married female. During the first interview session, the patient exhibits such compulsive behavior as self-mutilation in the form of mouth-biting, face-scratching, and nail-pulling. She also demonstrates narcissistic tendencies as evidenced by an obsession with her appearance. Prior to this interview, this patient attempted suicide. By the time the second interview is filmed, eight months later, the patient no longer demonstrates the compulsive symptoms noted earlier. She does show anxiety, however, along with an obsession with her relationship to her mother.
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140.
Title: On psychiatry: a view from the twenties
Date: 1963
Run Time: 51 min.
Names: Lewin, Bertram David; Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic; WIIC-TV (Pittsburgh, Pa.)
Abstract: This film is a recorded panel/conversation on the history of psychiatry and psychoanalysis in the United States, focusing on the period of the 1920s. It was produced at WIIC-TV for the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic (WPIC) in Pittsburgh. Dr. Bertram Lewin, visiting professor at WIPC, discusses key figures and trends from that era. Also on the panel are Dr. Roy Astley and Dr. Floyd Mallott, though Dr. Lewin does nearly all the speaking.
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141.
Title: Operation behavior modification: a demonstration program for intensive training of institutionalized mentally retarded girls
Date: 1966
Run Time: 40 min.
Names: Bureau of Child Research, University of Kansas; Parsons State Hospital and Training Center
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to present a research demonstration developed by the Parsons State Hospital and Training Center and the Bureau of Child Research at the University of Kansas. The program is designed to modify the behavior of trainable mentally retarded [intellectually disabled] girls to increase their potential and opportunities for functioning in the community. This objective is achieved with the aid of the residents and staff at Parsons State Hospital and the Parsons community residents. In this presentation, Ellen, a former resident of the Training School, demonstrates her skills as a nurse's aide in the community nursing home. The program then describes the development of the program that led to the release of Ellen and other residents of the institution to become functioning members of the community. According to this program, the key factor in modifying behavior is reinforcement through operant conditioning. The four major areas of training are personal appearance, occupational skills, social behavior, and academic subjects. Key features of the training program include establishing baseline data, payment of tokens for various achievements, and focused teaching methods.
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142.
Title: Operation reentry
Date: 1969?
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Atthowe, John M.; McDonough, Joseph M.; WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.)
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to describe and demonstrate a project started at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital in 1963. The project involved establishing a behavior modification laboratory in an effort to help motivate long-term mental patients to care for themselves and function effectively outside the hospital. In this program the project starts in a chronic ward where patients have been hospitalized for as long as 20 to 30 years. Reinforcement therapy is started. The charge nurse sees that the patients shave, dress, and clean the ward area, and assigns them other tasks. In return the patients are rewarded with tokens that they use to buy cigarettes, snacks, and other items. A house on the grounds is used for occupational therapy. The patients learn to cook, sew, clean, iron, and buy food. Sheltered workshops are established, where patients are taught to recondition telephones. Further planning by patients results in purchase of a gas station in the community near the hospital. Patients learn to service cars. Abandoned houses in the neighborhood are restored by teams of patients under supervision. The houses are shown before, during, and after the repairs, and later become halfway houses for the patients. Former patients help in the rehabilitation of the in-house patients and discuss problems to expect upon returning to the community, such as finding a place to live, obtaining work, and dealing with loneliness. The program emphasizes the need for reassurance to help regain confidence.
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143.
Title: Oral care and preventive hygiene for the mentally retarded
Date: 1966
Run Time: 21 min.
Names: Lozana, Carlos; Sellingsloh, W. C. ; E.R. Squibb, New Brunswick, N.J.; Sturgis-Grant Productions; Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation
Abstract: This film was made to increase awareness of the problem of oral care of the mentally retarded and to present successful approaches. Significant programs in oral care are underway at both the Austin and Travis State Schools for the mentally retarded in Austin, Texas. The model is that good care requires adapting ordinary methods and dental equipment, often quite radically, as well as providing emotional support and personal understanding. The roles of the staff dentist, the dental hygienist, the ward attendants, and the other staff members are discussed here, all focused on understanding the needs of the patient, in a coordinated effort to improve oral hygiene.
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144.
Title: Organic brain syndrome: diagnosis differentiation and management
Date: 196-?
Run Time: 33 min.
Names: Marder, Leon; Sandoz Pharmaceuticals; Cinematherapy Inc.
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to provide a broad overview of organic brain syndrome. This objective is achieved with the aid of clinical patients and an interview with a family member. The importance of early diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome is stressed. The film notes that there is little data on the incidence of organic brain syndrome; many patients with the disorder are treated as senile, psychiatric, or alcoholic while the real reason for their behavior remains undiagnosed. Symptoms such as sudden mood changes, loss of orientation as to time and place, inability to abstract, loss of immediate recall, inability to do simple calculations, and inappropriate laughter to cover depression are indications of the syndrome. An organic brain syndrome screening interview is demonstrated with a middle-aged female patient brought to the hospital drunk and disoriented. Once the organic brain syndrome has been recognized, the patient's short-term needs can be met and treatment structured to reduce additional stimulation, help restore memory and orientation, attend to rapid changes in mood, and reassure patients that delusions and hallucinations are not threatening. Some methods of implementing this treatment are discussed and demonstrated. The program stresses that the most effective treatment results from simple acts of human kindness.
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145.
Title: Organic brain syndrome: differential diagnosis; severe mental retardation - schizophrenia, hebephrenic type
Date: 1969
Run Time: 8 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This program provides a "telexample" (televised interview) illustrating a hospitalized patient with severe mental retardation as a result of an organic brain syndrome. The case illustrated in this presentation is a severely regressed male who exhibits slightly catatonic behavior and appears to be unaware of all questions directed to him. He uses meaningless words such as "sunsea." The differential diagnosis given in this presentation is schizophrenia, hebephrenic type.
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146.
Title: Out of darkness
Date: 1956
Run Time: 59 min.
Names: Cholden, Louis; Menninger, William Claire; Welles, Orson; Wyeth Laboratories; American Psychiatric Association; National Association for Mental Health; Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc. (CBS)
Abstract: Filmed in the Metropolitan State Hospital in Norwalk, Calif., this film is an actual record of three months in the life of one of the patients. It is composed largely of filmed psychotherapeutic sessions, in which a young woman, acutely ill with catatonic schizophrenia, is gradually started on her way to recovery. William C. Menninger is the medical narrator.
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147.
Title: Palmour Street (a study in family life)
Date: 1950
Run Time: 25 min.
Names: Stoney, George C.; Mason, William A.; Butler, E. E.
Abstract: This film shows events in the family life of rural African-American families living on Palmour Street in Gainesville, Georgia. It illustrates basic concepts of mental health as they relate to family life and highlights some of the ways that parents influence the mental and emotional development of their children. Also addressed are the challenges for a household in which both parents work outside the home. Shots include: a health clinic waiting room, people dancing on the front porch, pea-shelling, communal outdoor clothes-washing with washboards and tubs, and other scenes.
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148.
Title: Paranoid schizophrenia
Date: 1969
Run Time: 9 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This program consists of televised excerpts or "telexamples" from an 11-minute psychiatric interview session. The patient in this presentation is a middle-aged man who demonstrates paranoid delusions, disturbances in affect, and thinking disorders typical of a paranoid schizophrenic. Specifically, the patient describes his belief that his wife is seeing another man, fear that his car is involved in a narcotics deal, hallucinations of "colored pictures," and a belief that he has been poisoned. The patient mentions that he feels "calmer than before" as a result of the "shots" he received during his hospitalization.
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149.
Title: Paranoid state and deterioration following head injury
Date: 1939
Run Time: 11 min.
Names: Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic (Baltimore, Md.); Spring Grove State Hospital (Catonsville, Md.)
Abstract: In this film, the psychiatrist interviews the patient, an electric railroad motorman, aged 59, who has been hospitalized for ten years. Two years before admission, he was in a railroad accident, suffered a fractured skull, and was unconscious for two weeks. Following this, he was confused and irritable. He recalled the accident, but had no memory of the injury, could not recognize his incapacity for work, and believed that doctors and employees plotted against him. The interview illustrates his rambling, circumstantial flow of talk, which conveys disjointed, inconsistent, but dominant ideas of persecution.
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150.
Title: Parergasic reaction (schizophrenia) in a person of low intelligence: "oh, pardon me, doctor" : a parergasic reaction with stereotyped speech and posture
Date: 1939
Run Time: 16 min.
Names: Leighton, Alexander H.; Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic (Baltimore, Md.); Spring Grove State Hospital (Catonsville, Md.); Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows a mentally retarded, schizophrenic adult male in an interview with his doctor and includes the patient's history and the doctor's summary of the interview. The patient exhibits extreme stereotyped grimaces and speech, vagueness, concrete use of abstract expressions, and the use of neologisms. The patient says his behavior prevents assault from others. Shot at Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic and Spring Grove Hospital.
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151.
Title: Pathological anxiety
Date: 1960
Run Time: 27 min.
Names: Robert Anderson Associates; Canadian Broadcasting Corporation; International Film Bureau
Abstract: This film illustrates the nature of one common form of psychoneurosis, acute anxiety. In a series of interviews with a psychiatrist, the patient describes his attempts to "bottle up" his feelings of rage. Another psychiatrist explains the workings of the unconscious mind and its relationship to human behavior. When this patient learns how to handle his feelings of hostility in a more constructive way, rather than suppressing them, he will begin to improve.
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152.
Title: Place to live
Date: 1959
Run Time: 25 min.
Names: Dynamic Films Incorporated; National Social Welfare Assembly; DuBois, Margaret; Scourby, Alexander; National Committee on the Aging
Abstract: This film presents the challenge of retired parents living with married children and the dissensions it engenders, dramatically portrayed. Some of the possible solutions are discussed in the film. Shot in New York City and Meriden, Connecticut.
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153.
Title: Point of return: [characteristic of suicidal tendencies]
Date: 1964
Run Time: 25 min.
Names: Cornelison, Floyd S.; Hellams, Alfred A.; Griffith, John D.; University of Oklahoma; Oklahoma State Dept. of Health
Abstract: This program, narrated by Dr. Karl Menninger, Director of the Menninger Foundation, deals with the problem of suicide. It presents a simulated suicide portrayal followed by a group discussion of the behavioral characteristics of the man shown in the case, as well as suicidal persons in general. The case presented is a man who contemplates and eventually commits suicide as a result of depression following separation from his wife. He demonstrates several suicidal clues including rage, insomnia, depression, and ambivalence regarding his decision to commit suicide. The suicide note he leaves explains that he "doesn't want to hurt his parents or his wife" and that "at least it's a way out." A group discussion is presented, using replays of scenes to point out characteristics of suicide attemptors. The discussion group is composed of professionals including psychiatrists, a social worker, and the director of a suicide prevention center. The group notes a preoccupation with suicide, ambivalence regarding the desire to live, fantasy, and a general change in the man's personality. Also discussed are statistics on suicide and the need for suicide prevention programs.
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154.
Title: Preface to a life
Date: 1950
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Kaufman, M. Ralph; Sun Dial Films, Inc.; U.S. Public Health Service
Abstract: This film is a dramatization with voice-over narration showing sequences of a newborn baby's possible life to demonstrate the effects of good parenting. The same events are shown once with understanding parents and once with parents who expect too much of the child.
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155.
Title: Prefrontal lobotomy in chronic schizophrenia
Date: 1944
Run Time: 14 min.
Names: Bennett, Abram Elting; Psychiatric Department, Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital (Omaha, Neb.); Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film shows the improvement that can result from prefrontal lobotomy in chronic psychotics. Four patients are shown before and after the operation. Patients include one 25-year-old aggressive female, one 22-year-old aggressive male, one female who had been catatonic for five years, and one 26-year-old Ph.D. who has had catatonic lapses in the last three years. All patients appeared calmer and more sociable after surgery. Only the five-year catatonic female had to continue hospitalization after the lobotomy, although she had improved greatly. Filmed at the Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska.
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156.
Title: Prefrontal lobotomy in the treatment of mental disorders
Date: 1942
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: Watts, James W.; Freeman, Walter; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College; Department of Neurology, George Washington University
Abstract: This film describes and demonstrates a prefrontal lobotomy, an operative procedure employed in mental disorders resistive to other methods of treatment. The procedure consists of cutting the white matter in each frontal lobe in the plane of the coronal suture. This passes just anterior to the frontal horn of the ventricle and interrupts the anterior thalamic radiation. This film includes a written description of the procedure, review of landmarks on the skull and frontal lobe on a demonstration skull and brain, operation on a live patient, and X-rays taken after the operation. Filmed with cooperation of George Washington University.
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157.
Title: Preventive psychiatry: in or out
Date: 1961
Run Time: 31 min.
Names: Roland Reed Productions; U.S. Navy
Abstract: This film outlines the process by which the Navy identifies men with potential psychiatric problems, counsels recruits who are having trouble adapting to Navy life, and decides which recruits have a good chance of being successful in the Navy and which should be discharged for psychiatric reasons. Most of the footage consists of psychiatrists interviewing recruits.
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158.
Title: Preventive psychiatry: troubled seas
Date: 1964
Run Time: 53 min.
Names: Ralph Lopatin Productions; U.S. Navy
Abstract: This film demonstrates, via case studies of one officer and three enlisted men, how the U.S. Navy uses outpatient counseling to treat personnel suffering from anxiety, stress, irritability, and other relatively mild psychological disorders. Each patient is first shown in a work situation displaying inappropriate behavior. Then each in turn is shown being interviewed by superior officers. The superior officers contact medical officers and make arrangements for the disturbed men to be seen by psychological counselors. The counselors interview the men, evaluate them, and recommend one or more therapy sessions per week to talk about the men’s problems. The patients and counselors are seen at several stages during the therapy process, each patient exhibiting some signs of improvement at every stage. The counselors and the superior officers discuss the cases and agree on how the patients should be handled during their duty hours, so that gains made during counseling sessions are reinforced. Most of the footage of this film consists of one-on-one interviews between patients and psychiatric counselors.
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159.
Title: Problem of pupil adjustment. Part one, The drop-out: a case study
Date: 1951
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Audio Productions, Inc.; McGraw-Hill Book Co.; McGraw-Hill Text-Films; Alexis I. DuPont Special School District; Batchelder, Howard; Sorenson, Herbert
Abstract: This film profiles a young man, Steve Martin, who dropped out of high school and has been "riding the rails" and bumming around for three years since. It mentions a national dropout rate of 50 percent, and follows Steve's experience, examining why students make the decision to leave school. In this case, he began as an enthusiastic freshman, but grew bored and except for shop class, did not see the application of what he was learning to "real life." Steve begins skipping class, ends up dropping out, and is depicted as a person with a bleak future and few opportunities.
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160.
Title: Problem of pupil adjustment. Part two, The stay-in: a school study
Date: 1951
Run Time: 19 min.
Names: Audio Productions, Inc.; McGraw-Hill Book Co.; McGraw-Hill Text-Films; Alexis I. DuPont Special School District; Batchelder, Howard; Sorenson, Herbert
Abstract: This films looks at teaching methods and philosophies that engage students, helping them to stay in, rather than drop out of, school. It argues that the nation's 50 percent dropout rate is due to "failure of pupil adjustment," and examines a successful school with a low dropout rate, Alexis I. DuPont School in Wilmington, Delaware. DuPont is shown to engage students by inviting their ideas and encouraging them to apply what they're learning to their day-to-day lives. In one science class, a student suggests an experiment for comparing pre- and post-exercise pulse rates, and the whole class implements it. Cooperative, team learning is emphasized, but most of all, "learning from experience."
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161.
Title: Psychiatrist in the community
Date: 1966
Run Time: 23 min.
Names: Lindemann, Erich; Mason, Edward A.; Harvard Medical School, Mental Health Training Film Program
Abstract: Outlining a concept of the community, Dr. Erich Lindemann describes the importance to the psychiatrist of understanding the structure and practices of a community as he extends his concerns beyond the patients who seek his care. The problem of access, gaining sanction, and learning the power structure, as well as defining his role and realizing his limitations, are crucial to the community psychiatrist. Dr. Lindemann relates some of his own experiences in bereavement studies, in the Wellesley, Mass., Human Relations Service, and during a polio epidemic, in order to illustrate the problems and development of his philosophy. Filmed at Harvard Medical School.
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162.
Title: Psychoanalysis
Date: 1967
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Piers, Maria W.; Redlich, Frederick C.; Benedek, Therese; Kenward, John F.; WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.); National Educational Television
Abstract: This program presents segments from three different psychoanalytic sessions, showing the development of the relationship between a middle-aged man and his male psychoanalyst. Dr. Piers introduces the interviews by defining psychoanalysis and psychoanalysts, and by briefly describing the process of psychoanalysis. After each interview segment she describes what has taken place in the relationship between the psychoanalyst and client. The focus of the interviews is the father-son relationship. In the first interview the client describes problems that seem to center on his job and difficulty with his bosses, which have caused him to change jobs frequently. During this interview the client and psychoanalyst get to know each other. The second interview takes place several months later. In this interview, the client is discussing whatever enters his mind. He discusses his feelings toward his bosses and his feelings toward his father. Dr. Piers comments that the psychoanalyst's approval is important to him at this time. She briefly discusses the significance of dreams and transference. The third interview takes place several months after the second and the client compares his feelings toward his bosses with those he has toward his father. He explores the possibility that these feelings are his feelings of inadequacy and anger toward himself, projected on others. Dr. Piers comments that one conflict has been outgrown, thus freeing energies to deal with others. She briefly describes the effectiveness of psychoanalysis.
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163.
Title: Psychoanalysis. Part 1.
Date: 1965
Run Time: 45 min.
Names: Arlow, Jacob A.; Benedek, Therese; Ross, Helen; Tyler, Ralph Winfred; Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Institute; Conference on Training Analysis in the United States; Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic
Abstract: Psychoanalysts from Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Menninger Clinic, Stanford University, Chicago Psychoanalytic Institute, and others held a three-day conference at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic to discuss the role of psychoanalysis in the medical school curriculum and the issues of recruitment of students to the Psychoanalytic Training Institute.
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164.
Title: Psychoneuroses: organic signs, their differentiation
Date: 1944
Run Time: 23 min.
Names: "Goodhart, Simon P.; Balser, Benjamin Harris; Neuropsychiatric Division, Montefiore Hospital (New York, N.Y.)
Abstract: This film shows several types of psychoneurotic patients at Montefiore Hospital, New York, and exhibits the patients' symptoms before, during, and after chemical and hypnotic therapy. Symptoms include: weakness and stiffness of extremities, facial changes, excessive salivation, forced closure of eyes, astasia-abasia gait, pseudocyesis, unconsciousness, convulsive movements, bizarre responses to finger-to-nose test, tremors, forced buddha position, convulsions, etc. In one case, the film shows a brain slice that proves the patient had an organic cause to his symptoms. Detailed case histories are in file.
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165.
Title: Psychosis with drug intoxication: differential diagnosis: acute schizophrenic episode, anxiety neurosis
Date: 1969
Run Time: 14 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This program is a "telexample" (televised segment) of an interview between a psychiatrist and a patient with a psychosis resulting from drug intoxication. It consists of two separate interview segments with a middle-aged woman diagnosed as having an acute brain syndrome. During the first interview she displays disorientation and hallucinations. In the second interview, one week later, the patient explains that the hallucinations have stopped, but she doesn't "recall talking to the doctor at all." The differential diagnosis for this patient includes an anxiety neurosis.
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166.
Title: Psychosomatic conditions: obesity
Date: 1963
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Robert Anderson Associates Limited; Kravitz, Henry; Rakoff, Vivian M.; Lehmann, Heinz Edgar
Abstract: This is an illustration of how psychotherapy helped a 13-year-old girl get off the neurotic merry-go-round (she was unhappy because she was fat and she ate because she was unhappy). The film shows the entire family involved in her treatment. Shot at the Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Canada.
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167.
Title: Quiet one
Date: 1948
Run Time: 67 min.
Names: Bernard, Viola W.; Film Documents, Inc.; Mayer-Burstyn; Wiltwyck School for Boys (Ulster County, New York)
Abstract: Donald Peters is a mentally disturbed black boy, the victim of a disrupted home in Harlem, who at the age of ten is sent to the Wiltwyck School for delinquent boys. With the aid of the psychiatrist and counselors, he receives training and support which help him grow emotionally stronger. His behavior includes running away, stealing, destruction of property, skipping school, and self-flagellation. The film shows the school as a camp-like atmosphere that includes fishing, hiking, butterfly-catching, crafts, cooking, basketball, and checkers. Shots include New York City slums (exteriors and interiors), market places, and barber; child hitting self with telephone cord and later imitating counselor shaving; and boys fishing.
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168.
Title: Recent modifications of convulsive shock therapy
Date: 1941
Run Time: 13 min.
Names: University of Nebraska at Omaha, Dept. of Neurology and Psychiatry; Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital, Psychiatric Dept. (Omaha, Neb.)
Abstract: Convulsive shock's usefulness in treating affective disorders is discussed. Metrazol convulsions have been the most popular method, but spinal and extremity fractures made it hazardous until preliminary curare therapy markedly softened the convulsions. A case of manic excitement is shown to illustrate the curare-metrazol therapy. Good results are usually seen after six to eight treatments. A second treatment using quinine methochloride instead of curare is shown. Methoquinine and metrazol may be administered simultaneously. Post-treatment apnea is more prolonged with curare. Advocates of electro-shock therapy claim that the patient fears it less, loses consciousness instantly, and has softer convulsions. The seizure, however, is still severe and fractures occur. Preliminary curarization will prevent trauma in electro-shock therapy. Shots include: patients receiving curare, quinine methochloride, metrazol, and electro-shock; patients having strong and soft seizures; reactions to the therapies being pointed out; a nurse mixing methoquinine and metrazol; the electro-shock apparatus; and an X-ray of a patient injured during a strong seizure. Shot in Omaha, Nebraska.
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169.
Title: Referred for underachievement: a family evaluation interview at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
Date: 1966
Run Time: 35 min.
Names: Bernstein, Norman R.; Mason, Edward A.; Harvard Medical School, Mental Health Training Film Program
Abstract: This film suggests the possibilities of the family session as an intake technique. Afforded a view of the identified patient's total situation, the psychiatrist may be better able to observe family processes, to formulate some preliminary hypotheses as to the source of the difficulties, to locate problems as they exist in individual members or groupings within the family, and to learn the ways in which the family members perceive themselves and others.
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170.
Title: Rick: an adolescent suicide
Date: 1969
Run Time: 24 min.
Names: Farberow, Norman L.; Scott, Richard S.; University of Southern California, School of Medicine; Suicide Prevention Center of Los Angeles
Abstract: This program illustrates the process of investigation used in a suicide case, showing the methods used by the Suicide Prevention Center of Los Angeles when confronted with an uncertain death. The case study portrayed begins with a statement describing the circumstances of the death of a 17-year-old white male, Richard Nichols. The process of investigation includes interviewing the boy's parents, one of his teachers, the family doctor, and a close friend. Through this research, the program concluded that the boy was suffering from depression and the cause of death was indeed suicide.
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171.
Title: Rights of age
Date: 1966
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: Kaufman, M. Ralph; International Film Bureau; Mental Health Film Board (New York, N.Y.); Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, Office for the Aging
Abstract: This film, about protective services for the aging, dramatizes the story of one recluse who, like many older people, attempts to be self-sufficient long after she is able. Not until she becomes physically disabled does the community have an opportunity to extend to her the various benefits now available for the aged. Twenty or 30 other older individuals are examined in the film, all in need of physical, psychological, or legal assistance.
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172.
Title: Rx roses
Date: 1969
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Motion Picture Project; U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Health Services and Mental Health Administration, Cancer Control Program
Abstract: This film demonstrates the value of comprehensive patient care. It follows the case of a patient who undergoes a radical mastectomy, recovers, and returns to work. It shows how 20 different types of medical personnel, including mental health practitioners, offer comprehensive care, helping the patient and her family during the ordeal.
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173.
Title: Schizophrenia, paranoid type: differential diagnosis: hysterical neurosis, conversion type: schizophrenia, schizo-affective type
Date: 1969
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to present behavior characteristic of paranoid schizophrenia through the use of segments from a thirty-minute interview between a schizophrenic patient and a psychiatrist. The patient is a middle-aged, partially crippled male who displays grandiosity with underlying feelings of inferiority, as shown by his claims to a great wealth of knowledge in technical fields. The interview illustrates a well-known method of questioning used for diagnosis of schizophrenia, i.e., asking the patient to explain his interpretation of popular maxims.
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174.
Title: Schizophrenia: the shattered mirror
Date: 1966
Run Time: 60 min
Names: Kubie, Lawrence S.; Osmond, Humphry; National Educational Television; Harold Mayer Productions Inc.; Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital (Baltimore, Md.)
Abstract: This is the first of two programs dealing with the seriously disturbed. This program concentrates on schizophrenia, a mental disease that is widespread, but about which little is known as to causes and cures. The documentary shows some of the ways that psychiatrists and others are attempting to help people suffering from schizophrenia. Shot at the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.
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175.
Title: Schizophrenic reaction, acute undifferentiated type
Date: 1969
Run Time: 7 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" (televised interview) presents excerpts from a ten-minute intake interview between a psychiatrist and a schizophrenic patient. The patient shown is a young woman who displays paranoid tendencies. She describes her supernatural powers to reinterpret the Bible and to read other people's minds. The patient explains these powers as "God-given." In this presentation, she demonstrates inappropriate affect and magical thinking.
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176.
Title: Acute undifferentiated schizophrenia; differential diagnosis: homosexuality
Date: 1969
Run Time: 8 min.
Names: University of Mississippi Medical Center, Dept. of Psychiatry
Abstract: This "telexample" is an illustration of a psychiatric interview session with a patient demonstrating a schizophrenic reaction. The patient illustrated in this program is a male adolescent with homosexual tendencies. In reply to questions, the patient describes fantasies, "grey dreams" and other hallucinations that have been occurring recently. After a short period of general discussion, the patient explains the guilt and embarrassment that have accompanied his homosexuality. The differential diagnosis includes acute undifferentiated schizophrenic reaction to homosexuality.
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177.
Title: Shaping the personality
Date: 1953
Run Time: 16 min.
Names: Spitz, René A.; Wolf, Katherine M.; Psychoanalytic Research Project on Problems of Infancy; New York University Film Library
Abstract: This film illustrates forms of mother-child relations and their influence on the child. A brief anamnesis of the mother’s pregnancy, emphasizing behavior during breastfeeding, attempts to present the biological and psychological factors that influence emergent mother-child relations and that help decide the future attitude of the mother towards her child. Five mothers, breastfeeding their babies, are successively shown. The first patient, loving and secure; the second, outgoing with mild anxiety; the third, concerned but without hostility; the fourth, rejecting and hostile to her child; the fifth, hostile to an unwanted child. The behavior of the mothers in feeding and playing situations is shown as an expression of their conscious wishes of what their child should be like. Part I: The influence of prenatal conditions. Part II: The influence of the mother’s conscious and unconscious wishes.
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178.
Title: Some beginnings of social psychiatry
Date: 1965
Run Time: 14 min.
Names: Lindemann, Erich; Mason, Edward A.; Harvard College
Abstract: "Psychocinematologist" Edward A. Mason made this brief documentary film in which psychiatrist Dr. Erich Lindemann, a specialist in bereavement and a pioneer in the fields of social and community psychiatry, lectures in a classroom setting to a group of men seated around a table. Dr. Lindemann discusses the origins of community psychiatry, starting with his study of neurology in Heidelberg, Germany, at a time when the new field of medical anthropology was emerging. Gestalt theory was emerging as well, emphasizing the will as a legitimate object of study. The influence of Sigmund Freud and Erik Erikson are discussed, and Dr. Lindemann addresses Franz Brentano's "theory of action." He discusses the effects of war, aggressive behavior, and stress behavior on men, and describes how this has led to the field of predicament studies. Dr. Lindemann then discusses the future role of community psychiatry and its relationship to biological psychiatry, social sciences, and politics.
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179.
Title: Spruce House
Date: 1969?
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.); Henderson, John D.; Spruce House
Abstract: This program depicts the work done at inner-city Spruce House to treat and rehabilitate individuals with mental illness. Film footage illustrating everyday life at Spruce House is presented, along with verbal descriptions of the program by the staff. There are 20 residents and 19 staff members, including a part-time psychiatrist, fulltime social worker, registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, and nine counselors, who are undergraduate students. At Spruce House, patients earn chits which they use to purchase privileges and better living arrangements within the house. This token economy is designed to parallel the economy in the community. Residents earn by participating in social and work programs. Inappropriate behavior is ignored. The goal of the social program is to produce coherent and appropriate speech and social interaction. The residents also attend a group in which they evaluate each other's participation and give chits accordingly. The work program consists of the assignment of jobs within the house and in a toy factory in the community.
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180.
Title: Study in human development
Date: 1946
Run Time: 62 min.
Names: Behrens, Herman D.; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film documents a normal infant boy's mental and physical growth and social maturation from six weeks to five years of age. Reel 1 covers six to 30 weeks, and Reel 2 covers 19 months to five years of age. Assorted stimuli and tests are used, including rattles, blocks, crayons, a piano, stairs, pellet bottles, gym equipment, bells, balls, Seguin form board, manikin test, and the mare and foal test. Shots include: testing at home and in the classroom with other students, and samples of the child’s artwork at most stages of his development. The baby, Gerald, was born October 13, 1941. Parts I and II are on Reel 1, and parts III and IV are on Reel 2.
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181.
Title: Study in maternal attitude: the integration of mental health practices and pediatrics
Date: 1959
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: Herbert Krakow, Inc.; New York Fund for Children, Inc.; New York (N.Y.). Dept. of Health
Abstract: This film shows how doctors and nurses can be trained to interpret the mother's feelings and attitudes during child health supervision visits. A consultant psychiatrist guides doctors in eliciting this information and gives emotional support in this clinical setting. This film was shot in New York City.
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182.
Title: Study of infant behaviour
Date: 1931
Run Time: 21 min.
Names: Gesell, Arnold; Erpi Picture Consultants, Inc.; Yale Clinic of Child Development
Abstract: In this film, Arnold Gesell gives a technical overview of the methods and procedures used to study infant development at the Yale Clinic of Child Development. Gesell himself narrates the film and appears on camera several times. Over footage that illustrates his text, Gesell explains what happens when a child is brought to the Clinic by her mother and a social worker. The baby is placed in a crib in the "photographic dome," a brightly-lit setting with a one-way vision screen at one end. Hidden cameras record the baby’s behavior. In this demonstration, a 16-week-old girl is given the following tests: the dangling ring, chair-sitting, cube, spoon, pellet, and form board. Her behavior is then contrasted with that of a 44-week-old girl who is given similar tests. Examiners observe and test the infants while a stenographer records the examiner’s dictation. As Gesell explains the value of a permanent film record, a Clinic staff member is shown threading a reel of film into a special viewer that permits the operator to look at one frame at a time. Tracings are made over the image so researchers can study body positions and attitudes and compare them. Growth behavior patterns thus become visible. The guidance nursery at the Clinic is shown. It has a one-way vision screen, like the photographic dome, and older children can be studied unobserved. The guidance nursery includes blocks, toys, an indoor pool, and an outdoor playground. Gesell speaks into the camera and says that the growth of the mind expresses itself in patterns of behavior. Science is exploring the laws that govern these patterns and the growth of human personality.
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183.
Title: Suicidal patient
Date: 1967
Run Time: 58 min.
Names: Farberow, Norman L.; Litman, Robert E.; Shneidman, Edwin S.; Medical Television Network; National Center for Suicide Prevention; University of Southern California, School of Medicine; University of California, Los Angeles, School of Medicine
Abstract: The purpose of this program is to suggest guidelines for the general practitioner in recognizing and handling the potentially suicidal patient. It begins with the case presentation of a woman who takes an overdose of drugs. The program then shifts to a general discussion of suicide. Dr. Norman L. Farberow of the Psychology Department of the University of Southern California describes the nature of suicide attempts and the role of the medical examiner in establishing if a death has resulted from suicide. A brief discussion of suicide in art and literature is included. Next, Dr. Robert Litman, co-director of the Suicide Prevention Center in Los Angeles, discusses signals that indicate imminent suicide. This part of the program includes an interview with a patient. This doctor recommends evaluating the suicide plan, the severity of the symptoms, consideration of the individual's basic personality, the precipitating stress, and the individual's mental and physical resources. Next, Dr. Edwin S. Shneidman, Chief of the Center for Studies of Suicide Prevention, describes the philosophy behind suicide prevention. In addition, the presentation reviews current research being done by the National Center for Suicide Prevention and provides discussions of the etiology and cultural patterns of suicide. The program concludes with a summary of the physician's role in preventing suicide and recommendations for how to respond effectively to the suicidal patient.
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184.
Title: Symptoms in schizophrenia
Date: 1938
Run Time: 12 min.
Names: Page, James D.; Psychological Cinema Register of the Pennsylvania State College
Abstract: This film describes and demonstrates four types of schizophrenia. Filmed at various New York institutions, it shows patients singly and grouped in large, outside recreational areas. Some patients are blindfolded. Symptoms shown include: social apathy, delusions, hallucinations, hebephrenic reactions, cerea flexibilitas, rigidity, motor stereotypes, posturing, and echopraxia.
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185.
Title: Techniques of therapeutic communication
Date: 1970
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Concept Media (Costa Mesa, Calif.)
Abstract: This program identifies techniques of therapeutic communication nurses can use to help patients express themselves so that their needs can be identified and met. Dramatized interviews are employed to aid in defining and illustrating techniques for talking with patients. These techniques include encouraging conversation by using broad opening statements, general leads, and reflections. Helping the patient express his thoughts and feelings by sharing observations, acknowledging feelings, selective reflecting using silence, and giving information are also discussed. In addition, insuring mutual understanding by clarifying, verbalizing implied thoughts and feelings, and validating are covered.
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186.
Title: Teens
Date: 1957
Run Time: 26 min.
Names: Roberts, C. A.; Wake, F. R.; Crawley Films; National Film Board of Canada; Mental Health Division, Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada
Abstract: This film presents that volatile and much discussed group, teenagers. Using the setting of everyday life in an urban middle-income family, the film shows Joan, a girl of 15, and her brothers Barry, age 14, and Timmy, age 13, together with their parents and friends. Basic similarities in the attitudes and actions of this group are offset by individual differences reflected in their developing personalities.
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187.
Title: The bed
Date: 1968
Run Time: 20 min.
Names: Broughton, James Richard
Abstract: A playful, reflective film celebrating an old four-poster brass bed. The movie begins with the bed rolling down a hillside, and all the activity takes place out-of-doors. Nude actors present numerous scenes, ranging from serious to humorous, around the bed. The scenes are graphic and the film was intended for educational use in a therapeutic setting.
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188.
Title: They're your people
Date: 1969?
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Hansell, Norris; Visotsky, Harold M.; H. Douglas Singer Zone Center (Chicago, Ill.); WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.)
Abstract: This film addresses the role of the community health center in helping people with mental illness to resume their lives and avoid commitment to mental hospitals. The development of the "zone concept" in the state of Illinois and its implementation at the H. Douglas Singer Zone Center are described. Members of the community pitch in to plan for and assist current patients; professional staff members can then spend more time out in the field locating potential patients before a crisis situation develops. The role of the officer of the day at the Singer Center is described and demonstrated. During the 24 hours he is on call, he responds to distress calls within the zone, assesses the situation, and arranges for a meeting among a patient, the family, and members of the health center staff. The objective is to help the family cope with the patient and to plan home management. The role of various members in the community such as ministers, police officers, and former patients is explored.
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189.
Title: Third eye
Date: 1965
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Fortin, J. N.; Lehmann, Heinz E.; Robert Anderson Associates; Smith, Kline & French Laboratories; Hôpital Notre-Dame (Montréal, Quebec)
Abstract: This film tells the story of a sensitive graduate nurse who is the target of the provocative behavior of a hospitalized, emotionally-disturbed young man. She reacts with increasing anxiety, and seriously considers asking to be transferred out of the ward. During this crisis, she and her fiancé, a young resident in general medicine at the same hospital, learn a technique for responding therapeutically to the emotional behavior of their patients. A dramatic change in the therapeutic climate occurs when the nurse adopts a sympathetic and concerned, yet objective, approach to her patient’s conduct. Shots include: exterior and grounds of the Notre Dame Hospital, and a nurse and doctor walking on a mountainside and discussing the importance of role-playing with an actor.
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190.
Title: This year, next year, sometime
Date: 1962
Run Time: 17 min.
Names: Jackson, Gordon; Marlborough Day Hospital, St. John's Wood (London)
Abstract: This documentary film describes day-hospital treatment of emotionally-disturbed children. The main purpose of the film is to let parents, practitioners, and teachers know about the Marlborough Day Hospital's work, so that they will be aware of the therapeutic possibilities available for such children at an early stage of their illness, when they are more likely to respond to treatment. The film may also provide a basis for the discussion of psychosis in children.
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191.
Title: Toward independence
Date: 1947
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: U.S. Army
Abstract: This film shows how modern developments in medical treatment and physical therapy have made it possible for paraplegic victims of spinal cord injury to lead more independent lives. Some of the therapies discussed and shown are: the use of footboards and splints; passive exercise of the affected extremities; heat and massage to increase circulation and maintain muscle tone; hydrotherapy in a Hubbard tank; occupational therapy; ultraviolet light therapy; and dynamic physical exercises. The importance of psychological adjustment to reduced mobility and its role in rehabilitation is presented in story form as the progress of two paraplegic men is followed. The exercises that are necessary to develop the muscles and skills that will permit mobility are shown in detail as one man begins his journey from helplessness in bed to relative independence with the use of braces and crutches. The exercises include bed exercises, mat workouts in a gym, shifting from wheelchair to toilet and from bed to wheelchair, practicing walking with "shortie" and regular length crutches, training in posture and balance on the parallel bars, learning to open doors, climb stairs, get on a bus, cross at a traffic light, and get in and out of a car. After the patient leaves the hospital, he is shown driving his car to work, getting out of the car by himself, and doing desk work in a factory.
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192.
Title: Tradition and progress in African psychiatry
Date: 1960
Run Time: 28 min.
Names: Mairlot, Fernand; Sandoz Pharmaceuticals, Medical Film Library
Abstract: This film describes tradition and progress in psychiatry in modern-day Africa. Clinical subjects as well as scenes from village life are presented. As the film opens, the life of a village is disrupted when one of the villagers, Alexis, goes berserk. He is tied to a tree. The leaders of the village go to the soothsayer to determine the cause of the problem and what must be done to drive out the evil spirits. The role of the soothsayer is explored. The leader of the village sacrifices a chicken, until the asked-for goat is found. The supernatural meanings of these rites are discussed. When Alexis is not healed of his affliction, the village leaders decide to take him to the white doctor for a cure. The program then explores the work of the psychiatrist in trying to recognize and preserve the culture of the patient and to reintegrate him into his former life. The previous history of the case is reviewed and Alexis provides some insight into what he feels has caused his problem. Immediate treatment with neuroleptic drugs is begun. The program explores some reasons for the psychiatric problems such as the use of symbols, the clash between western and African cultures, and cerebral degeneration due to advanced age. Various diagnostic tests that are important in understanding the patient's personality as a whole are described and demonstrated. Treatments such as occupational therapy, play therapy, dance therapy, and drug therapy are discussed. Alexis is shown being discharged after two months of therapy.
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193.
Title: Training resources and techniques
Date: 1968?
Run Time: 24 min.
Names: Hoyt, Robert K.; Leland, Henry; Parsons State Hospital and Training Center; U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Vocational Rehabilitation Administration
Abstract: This presentation explores the role of the vocational counselor as he assists the mentally disabled client in adapting to new situations and jobs. This film features male and female subjects, a vocational counselor, employers, and the staff at Parsons State Hospital and Training Center. Three primary objectives are discussed: to help the client assume some responsibility for how the job turns out, to help the client acquire a sense of self-esteem, and to help him integrate himself into a society designed and populated by non-disabled people. Community resources are explored, including combined work-study programs in public schools and sheltered workshops operated by churches, business organizations, and nonprofit groups. The program describes in detail the training program established at Parsons State Hospital and Training School, in which reinforcement techniques are used to teach new skills and effect behavioral changes. The four key factors in an effective incentive and training system are realism, reward, recognition, and responsibility.
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194.
Title: Treatment in mental disorders
Date: 1949
Run Time: 13 min.
Names: Page, James D.; University of Rochester
Abstract: This film shows practices in a psychiatric hospital, including interviews, physical examination on admission, forced feedings, "wet-pack," "continuous tub," hydrotherapy, heat therapy, use of sedatives, narcotics, insulin, metrazol, fever therapy, occupational therapy, and recreational management.
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195.
Title: Trouble in mind. [Part 2]
Date: 1965
Run Time: 34 min.
Names: Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic; United Mental Health Service of Alleghany County; WIIC (Pittsburgh, Pa.)
Abstract: This film focuses on the obstacles people face in asking and getting help for mental illness. Among those discussing the need for counseling, social services, and nurses as co-therapists are a general practitioner, nursing staff, various clergy, and other staff at mental health facilities. There is a general review of community-based mental health services, which are found lacking, and mention of federal pilot programs, including one to help parents whose children may be showing early signs of mental disturbance. None of the speakers are identified by name, simply by profession; e.g. general practitioner, nursing supervisor.
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196.
Title: Unconscious motivation: an instructional film
Date: 1949
Run Time: 39 min.
Names: Beck, Lester F.; Association Films
Abstract: This is a film record of hypnosis of two subjects during which an experimental neurotic conflict is produced, is allowed to manifest itself in the post-hypnotic conscious state, and is then relieved by helping the subjects to recall the implanted traumatic material through the interpretation of manifest dream symbols and free association to modified psychological projective tests. The film is excellent as a demonstration of the scientific use of hypnosis and the value of projective techniques in eliciting repressed ideas.
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197.
Title: Verbal facility masking concept deficit
Date: 1964
Run Time: 13 min.
Names: Jewish Guild for the Blind; National Institute of Mental Health; Benjamin, Lawrence; Gillman, Arthur E.; Kass, Walter
Abstract: This is part of a series of diagnostic studies of emotionally disturbed blind and visually-impaired children. The film gives the case history of an eleven-year-old partially blind child and shows parts of the diagnostic studies that are carried out.
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198.
Title: Wake-up
Date: 1967
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Brown Camps Residential Treatment Centre; Brown Camps Ltd.; Allan King Associates; Canadian Educational Programs
Abstract: This film describes and demonstrates the wake-up process used at the Brown Camps Residential Treatment Centres for emotionally-disturbed children. The program stresses the importance of remembering that the disturbed child is first and foremost a child with the same basic needs as children everywhere. Emphasis is placed on the staff-child relationship, and staff work to help the child overcome his reluctance to associate with the external world. The wake-up process is used to tune in to his anxiety, help him mobilize, and prepare him as well as possible to cope with the day ahead. The child is therefore awakened by the staff member with whom he has established the best relationship. In this presentation, Terry, the head of House 2, arrives and determines the waking order of the children. She bases this determination on such factors as how the children have slept, nightmares, acting out, and her own knowledge of the children. She is shown as she proceeds from child to child and demonstrates different methods of waking the children. These methods include such actions as opening the blinds or moving cups, offering coffee, gentle touching, caressing, or calling the child. With each child she tells them what day it is and describes the weather. In some instances she makes an error in judgment, awakens another child, and returns to try again. After all the children have risen and dressed, they go downstairs for breakfast. Breakfast is considered to be the final stage of the wake-up and, as such, is an informal affair.
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199.
Title: We, the mentally ill
Date: 1955
Run Time: 29 min.
Names: Denber, Herman; Dix, Dorothea Lynde; Overholser, Winfred; American Medical Association; Smith, Kline & French Laboratories
Abstract: The host is a man with mental illness, leading viewers through the history of the care of the mentally ill in the United States. The first section is a play about the work of Dorothea Lynde Dix, an advocate for better treatment of the mentally ill, staged by patients from St. Elizabeths Hospital. The second section describes the crowded conditions of the New Jersey State Hospital in Trenton, where there is one nurse per 118 patients and one psychiatrist per 600 patients. The final section shows a woman who hears voices at her hospital admission, and is shown again at her release after being treated with newly developed drugs. Dr. Herman Denber speaks about two new drugs to treat mental illness, and Dr. Winfred Overholser talks about the future of caring for the mentally ill.
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200.
Title: Wellmet House
Date: 1969
Run Time: 30 min.
Names: Wellmet House; Kantor, David; WTTW-TV (Chicago, Ill.)
Abstract: This program presents the staff and residents of Wellmet House, a halfway house located in a residential section of Boston. It stresses the importance of the group as a family, efforts to help patients avoid being placed in mental hospitals, and the role of the community in accepting and welcoming these patients. Scenes are shown of long-term patients in an institution who do very little, day after day, for years. They make no decisions and little is demanded of them. The program then focuses on the establishment of Wellmet House in an effort to take patients out of this environment and create an atmosphere where more is expected. The roles of the director of the home, the housemother, and the students are explored. The residents are shown in meetings, at meals, and at various social functions as they discuss their problems and new experiences. They describe their reactions to being out of the hospital and part of the community again. In a staff meeting, the students describe their reaction to the program and explore what can be done to raise the morale of the staff. Dr. Kantor expresses his belief that Wellmet House is currently suffering from too much success and is now mistakenly trying to have everyone conform. He stresses the need for individuals to retain some of their incompatible components and use these conflicts constructively.
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201.
Title: Working and playing to health: (as we see it)
Date: 1953
Run Time: 36 min.
Names: Bettag, Otto; Appel, Kenneth E.; Bay, Alfred Paul; International Film Bureau; Mental Health Film Board (New York, N.Y.); Illinois Dept. of Public Welfare
Abstract: Set in a state mental institution in central Illinois, this film presents information on, and reenactments of, the delivery of occupational, recreational, and industrial therapies to help patients. The message is that while doctors and nurses are necessary, other kinds of non-medical intervention are needed, too, for those suffering from mental illness. Therapists and staff are shown working with patients and discussing effective approaches with one another. Music therapy, patients learning job skills, bouncing balls to one another -- all are demonstrated. Respect and understanding of patients is emphasized.
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