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Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is a congenital (present from birth) growth disorder that causes large body size, large organs, and other symptoms.


The cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is unknown, but it may be genetic. Most cases are associated with a defect in chromosome number 11.

Infancy can be a critical period because of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), omphalocele (when present), and an increased rate of tumor development. Wilm's tumor and adrenal carcinoma are the most common tumors in patients with this syndrome.


Exams and Tests

The signs of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome include:

  • A ridge in the forehead caused by premature closure of the bones (metopic ridge)
  • Enlarged fontanelle (soft spot)
  • Enlarged kidneys, liver, and spleen
  • Large size (90th percentile)
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)

Tests for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome include:


Infants with low blood sugar may be treated fluids given through a vein (intravenous solutions).

Defects in the abdominal wall may need to be repaired. The child must be watched closely for the development of tumors.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome who survive infancy do well, although no long-term follow-up information is available. Mental development appears to be normal to very slightly decreased. Swelling of the tongue can cause problems with feeding and sleeping.

Possible Complications

  • Development of tumors
  • Feeding problems
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Respiratory difficulties from obstruction due to large tongue
  • Seizures

When to Contact a Medical Professional

If you have a child with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and worrisome symptoms develop, call your pediatrician immediately.


There is no known prevention for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Genetic counseling may be of value for families who would like to have additional children.


Cohen P, Hosono H. Hyperpituitarism, tall stature, and overgrowth syndromes. In: Kliegman, RM, Behrman RE, St. Geme III JW, Schor NF, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 554.

Update Date 5/10/2013

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