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17-Ketosteroids urine test

17-ketosteroids are substances that form when the body breaks down male steroid sex hormones called androgens and other hormones released by the adrenal glands in males and females, and by the testes in males.

How the Test is Performed

A 24-hour urine sample is needed. You will need to collect your urine over 24 hours. Your health care provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly to ensure accurate results.

How to Prepare for the Test

Your health care provider will ask you to temporarily stop any medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about all the medicines you take. These include:

  • Antibiotics
  • Aspirin (if you are on long-term aspirin)
  • Birth control pills
  • Diuretics (water pills)
  • Estrogen

Do not stop taking any medicine before talking to your doctor.

How the Test will Feel

The test involves normal urination. There is no discomfort.

Why the Test is Performed

Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of a disorder associated with abnormal levels of androgens.

Normal Results

Normal values are as follows:

  • Male: 8 to 20 milligrams (mg) per 24 hours
  • Female: 6 to 12 mg per 24 hr

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Increased levels of 17-ketosteroids may be due to:

Decreased levels of 17-ketosteroids may be due to:

  • Adrenal glands not making enough of their hormones (Addison's disease)
  • Kidney damage
  • Pituitary gland not making enough of its hormones (hypopituitarism)
  • Removal of the testicles (castration)


There are no risks with this test.



Guber HA, Farag AF. Evaluation of endocrine function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 24.

Update Date 10/29/2013