CHAPTER 31	INDEXING PRINCIPLES FOR CATEGORY J 
	(TECHNOLOGY, INDUSTRY, AGRICULTURE AND FOOD) 
 

31.1		Category J is devided into TECHNOLOGY, INDUSTRY, AND AGRICULTURE  
(J1) and FOOD and BEVERAGES (J2).   Most terms in this category are IM and for  
the most part are self-explanatory and relatively easy to index. 
 

31.2		All the headings involving fields of activity refer both to the  
field and to the practitioners and workers in that field. Thus, TEXTILE INDUSTRY  
is both the industry and the textile worker: MINING is the industry but also the  
miner: ENGINEERING is the field but also the engineer. See also 31.13. 
 

31.3		There are two sets of allowed qualifiers which are generally allowed  
with Category J terms. The J list includes: 
 
/hist		/methods	/statist	/instrum	 
/class		/legis		/econ		/man	 
/stand 
 
These are used chiefly with occupations and technologies.  
 

31.4		With food substances, materials and manufactured products usually  
only the substances list is used: 
 
/adv eff	econ		/rad eff	/supply 
/anal		/hist		/stand		/tox 
/class		/pois		/statist	/util 
 
When in doubt about the use of a given subheading with a specific main heading,  
check the AQ field in MeSH for that heading. 
 
 

31.5		FOOD (J2) and its many related headings (analysis, supply, handling,  
etc.) are in this category. In relation to FOOD are COOKERY (J1), DIET (E5, G6),  
DIET THERAPY (E2), DIETETICS (G2), and NUTRITION (G2, G6). Many of them overlap  
even within the context of an article. Follow these precepts as a guide to  
indexing: 
 
FOOD and ANIMAL FEED...the substance you or the animal eats. FOOD is also used  
as an NIM coordinate for "re-feeding", for example: 
 
Bovine dietary protein metabolism after 24 hours of fasting. (this is a  
veterinary article) 
FASTING / * metab 
DIETARY PROTEINS / * metab 
ANIMAL FEED 
TIME FACTORS 
CATTLE / * metab 
 
Dietary protein metabolism after 24 hours of fasting. (This uses nude mice) 
FASTING / * metab 
DIETARY PROTEINS / * metab 
FOOD 
TIME FACTORS 
NUDE MICE 
MICE (check tag) 
ANIMAL (check tag) 
 
DIET	what you eat, how much you eat, when you eat and how you eat (consider  
also EATING BEHAVIOR)  
 
COOKERY	how the food is prepared 
 
NUTRITION	why you eat and what happens to it after you eat it 
 
DIETETICS	principles of nutrition applied to feeding persons or groups of  
persons 
 
DIET THERAPY	a specific diet prescribed by a physician in treating a  
disease  
(usually will be seen as /diet ther) 
 
In almost all instances each of the above headings is IM. 
 

31.6		In addition to the main headings above, MeSH has many other food-  
and drink-related headings which appear to overlap: EATING (G10), DRINKING  
(G10), DRINKING BEHAVIOR (F1), and FEEDING BEHAVIOR (F1). While these themselves  
overlap, it is easy enough to differentiate them from the food terms in Category  
J. There is also no problem in indexing APPETITE (F2, G10) and HUNGER (F1, G10). 
 

31.7		Meat as food is indexed under MEAT (IM) and the animal source (NIM),  
as beef: MEAT (IM) + CATTLE (CHECK TAG); pork: MEAT (IM) + SWINE (NIM);  
horsemeat: MEAT (IM) + HORSES (NIM); chicken meat: MEAT (IM) + CHICKENS (NIM);  
turkey meat: MEAT (IM) + TURKEYS (NIM). 
 
For poultry not in MeSH, coordinate MEAT (IM) and POULTRY (NIM).  In addition  
MeSH has SEAFOOD for fish used as food plus the more specific SHELLFISH.  MEAT  
PRODUCTS, FISH PRODUCTS, and POULTRY PRODUCTS are available for processed foods  
such as sausage, scrapple, or chicken nuggets. 
 

31.8		Many terms indented under FOOD and BEVERAGES are also in Category B6  
as PLANTS, EDIBLE. Check the Alphabetic MeSH for all potential foods before  
indexing: do not work exclusively with Category J for specific plants used as  
food. Each heading may be indexed to indicate either the food or the plant  
aspect.  
 

31.9		Index food plants, plants as food or edible plants under FRUIT or  
VEGETABLES or the specific indentions under these if the identity of the edible  
plant can be ascertained from the text of the article. 
 
If the indexer is not able to determine whether the edible plant is a fruit or a  
vegetable, index under PLANTS, EDIBLE (Category B6). 
 
Very often the country where the edible plant is eaten as a staple is  
significant. In such cases, add a geographical heading. See 36.25. 
 

31.10		PLANTS AS TISSUE: (seealso 22.30) 
 
When the point of an article is plant tissue research rather than plants as  
food, index as specifically as possible using the headings from category B6.   
Use the specific name of the plant if it is in MeSH.  If the specific plant is  
not in MeSH then, using the text of the article or an authoritative reference  
book, try to index the plant into its correct taxonomic position using the terms  
in B6 indented under PLANTS.  If none of these terms are appropriate then index  
under PLANTS (IM or NIM).  Do not use PLANTS, EDIBLE for plant tissue research,  
rather, reserve PLANTS, EDIBLE for plants as food.  Remember that MeSH also has  
PLANTS, MEDICINAL and PLANTS, TOXIC, these may be either IM or NIM.  The MeSH  
heading PLANTS, TRANSGENIC is NIM except in very general articles and may be  
used in combination with other plant headings. 
 
Culturing mango cells for genetic engineering. 
PLANTS / *cytol  
(not FRUIT since it is tissue research)  
*CELL CULTURE  
*GENETIC ENGINEERING  
 
The nutritional value of mangoes. 
FRUIT / *chem 
 NUTRITIONAL VALUE  
 
The effect of x-rays on plants, using rice as the test plant. 
RICE / *rad eff  
 
The therapeutic use of rice in peptic ulcer diets. 
*RICE  
PEPTIC ULCER  / *  diet ther  
 
Standards of transgenic plant use in biotechnology. 
BIOTECHNOLOGY / *    stand  
*PLANTS, TRANSGENIC  
 
Expression of the barley Beg1 gene product in Arabidopsis. 
Beg1 protein / * biosyn / genet 
(from the Chem Tool) 
BARLEY / * genet 
(the source of the gene is IM) 
ARABIDOPSIS 
(the 'host' is NIM unless particularly discussed) 
GENES, PLANT 
 

31.11		The subheadings /adverse effects, /poisoning and /toxicity are  
available to this category and are often used with the specific foods in  
Category J. 
 
FOOD POISONING (IM) is for general articles on food poisoning. For poisoning by  
a specific food in category J2, index under the specific MeSH heading with the  
subheading /pois (IM) and add also FOOD POISONING (NIM). If a subheading is  
required with FOOD POISONING then it may be added NIM also. 
 
An outbreak of shellfish poisoning in Canada. 
SHELLFISH / * pois 
*DISEASE OUTBREAKS 
FOOD POISONING / epidemiol 
CANADA / epidemiol 
 

31.12		For food allergies, the heading FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITY (Category C20)  
is available. Index an allergy to specific foods in Category J with the  
subheading /adverse effects (IM) and coordinate with FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITY (IM).  
Do not assume, however, that all adverse effects of food are food allergies. 
 

31.13		In addition to INDUSTRY in this category, consider also OCCUPATIONS  
in Category N1. 
 
As stated in 31.2, the term for the industry or occupation or commercial  
endeavor (COMMERCE) will refer to the occupation itself or the person engaged in  
that occupation. That is, FISHERIES is the industry and the packer in the  
fishery is also indexed under FISHERIES. Do not add /manpower merely to  
represent the worker. 
 
The personality of the waitress. 
*PERSONALITY 
*RESTAURANTS 
(not RESTAURANTS / man) 
 
The training of barbers. 
BARBERING / * educ 
(not BARBERING / man) 
 
The availability of laundry workers. 
LAUNDERING / * man 
 

31.14		INDUSTRY is related to OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE and OCCUPATIONAL  
DISEASES in the following way. 
 
INDUSTRY is for the industrial milieu, OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE is the specialty  
and OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH is for the medical and physiological aspects of industry  
or industrial workers. OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES refers to the patient with the  
occupational disease or the occupation-related disease. 
 
Manpower in various industries in developing countries. 
INDUSTRY / * man 
*DEVELOPING COUNTRIES 
 
Epidemiological methods in industry. 
OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE / * methods	 
*EPIDEMIOLOGIC METHODS 
 
Mandatory physical examinations in industry. 
*PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 
*OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE 
(not INDUSTRY) 
 
Mandatory physical examinations in biotechnology. 
*PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 
*OCCUPATION MEDICINE 
*BIOTECHNOLOGY 
 
Smoking habits of workers. 
*SMOKING 
*OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH 
 
Occupational lung diseases. 
*LUNG DISEASES	 
*OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES 
 
Leukemia in vinyl chloride workers. 
LEUKEMIA / * chem ind 
VINYL CHLORIDE / * adv eff  
OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES / * chem ind 
 
Leukemia in vinyl chloride exposed workers. 
LEUKEMIA / * chem ind 
VINYL CHLORIDE / * adv eff 
OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES / * chem ind 
*OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE  
 

31.15		Use OCCUPATIONS for all occupations not specifically listed among  
those indented under INDUSTRY in this category or not elsewhere in this or other  
categories. 
 
When indexed, OCCUPATIONS or any specific occupation is probably IM. 
 

31.16	Diseases in persons engaged in any occupation or profession will be  
indexed under the name of the disease (IM), the name of the specific occupation  
if in MeSH (IM) and OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES (IM) - not OCCUPATIONS, not INDUSTRY,  
not OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE. 
 
If the disease is one of those indented under OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES in Category  
C21 (e.g., OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS; SILICOSIS) index under the specific disease  
and not under OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES. 
 
Salmonella infections in slaughterhouse workers. 
*SALMONELLA INFECTIONS  
*ABATTOIRS 
*OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES 
 
Joint diseases in ballet dancers. 
*JOINT DISEASES 
*DANCING 
*OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES 
 
Dermatitis in barbers. 
*OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS 
*BARBERING 
 
Dermatitis in dentists related to their work. 
*OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS 
*DENTISTS 
 
Non-work-related dermatitis in dentists. 
*DERMATITIS 
*DENTISTS 
 
Occupations open to diabetics. 
*DIABETES MELLITUS 
*OCCUPATIONS 
(not OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE) 
 
Optimal working hours for diabetics. 
*DIABETES MELLITUS 
*OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH 
WORK SCHEDULE TOLERANCE