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Stent

A stent is a tiny tube placed into an artery, blood vessel, or other hollow structure in your body (such as the tube that carries urine) to hold it open.

Coronary artery stent

Description

When a stent is placed into the body, the procedure is called stenting. There are different kinds of stents. Most are made of a metal or plastic mesh-like material. However, stent grafts are made of fabric. They are used in larger arteries.

An intraluminal coronary artery stent is a small, self-expanding, metal mesh tube. It is placed inside a coronary artery after balloon angioplasty to prevent the artery from re-closing.

A drug-eluting stent is coated with a medicine that helps further prevent the arteries from re-closing. Like other coronary artery stents, it is left permanently in the artery.

Why the Procedure is Performed

Most of the time, stents are used when arteries become narrow or blocked.

Stents are commonly used to treat the following conditions that result from blocked or damaged blood vessels:

Other reasons to use stents include:

Alternative Names

Drug-eluting stents; Urinary or ureteral stents; Coronary stents

References

Teirstein PS, Lytle BW. Interventional and surgicaltreatment of coronary artery disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds.Goldman's Cecil Medicine

White CJ. Atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds.Goldman's Cecil Medicine

Zeidel ML. Obstructive uropathy. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds.Goldman's Cecil Medicine

Update Date 5/27/2014

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