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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - quick-relief drugs

COPD - quick-relief drugs

Description

Quick-relief medicines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) work quickly to help you breathe better. You take them when you are coughing, wheezing, or having trouble breathing, such as during a flare-up.

These medicines are also called rescue drugs. Since they relax the muscles of your airways (bronchi) and open them up for easier breathing, they are also known as bronchodilators (meaning medicines that open the airways).

You and your doctor can make a plan for the quick-relief drugs that work for you. This plan will include when you should take your medicine and how much you should take.

Make sure you get your medicine refilled before you run out.

Quick-relief beta-agonist inhalers

Quick-relief beta-agonists help you breathe better by relaxing the muscles of your airways. They are short-acting, which means they stay in your system only for a short time.

Some people take them just before exercising. Ask your doctor if you should do this.

If you need to use these drugs more than 3 times a week, or if you use more than one canister a month, your COPD probably is not under control. You should call your doctor.

Kinds of quick-relief beta-agonists

Quick-relief beta-agonists include:

  • Albuterol (ProAir HFA, Proventil HFA, Ventolin HFA)
  • Levalbuterol (Xopenex HFA)
  • Metaproterenol
  • Terbutaline

Most of the time, these medicines are used as metered dose inhalers (MDI) with a spacer. Sometimes, especially if you have a flare-up, they are used with a nebulizer.

Side effects might include:

  • Anxiety.
  • Tremor.
  • Restlessness.
  • Headache.
  • Fast or irregular heartbeats. Call your doctor right away if you have this side effect.

Oral steroids

Oral steroids (also called corticosteroids) are medicines you take by mouth, as pills, capsules, or liquids. They are not quick-relief medicines, but are often given for 7 to 14 days when your symptoms flare-up. Sometimes you might have to take them for longer.

Oral steroids include:

  • Methylprednisolone
  • Prednisone
  • Prednisolone

References

Anderson B, Conner Anderson B, Conner K, Dunn C, et al. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). https://www.icsi.org/_asset/yw83gh/COPD.pdf.Accessed May 5, 2014.

Balkissoon R, Lommatzsch S, Carolan B, Make B. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a concise review.Med Clin N Am

Evensen AE. Management of COPD exacrbations. Am Fam Physician

Shapiro SD, Reilly JJ Jr, Rennard SI. Chronic bronchitis and emphysema. In: Mason RJ, Broaddus VC, Martin TR, et al.Murray & Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine

Update Date 4/26/2014

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