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Dirt - swallowing

This article is about poisoning from swallowing or eating dirt.

This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poisoning. If you or someone you are with is poisoned, call your local emergency number (such as 911) or the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

Poisonous Ingredient

There are no specific poisonous ingredients in dirt. But dirt might contain chemicals that kill insects or plants, fertilizers, parasites, or animal or human waste.

Symptoms

Swallowing dirt may cause constipation and a blockage in the intestines. These can cause stomach pain.

Before Calling Emergency

Have this information ready:

  • Person's age, weight, and condition
  • Time it was swallowed
  • Amount swallowed

Poison Control

The National Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) can be called from anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.

This is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

What to Expect at the Emergency Room

The person may not need to go to the emergency room. If they do go, treatment may include:

  • Intravenous fluids (through a vein)
  • Medicines to treat symptoms
  • Tube placed down the nose and into the stomach (if the intestines are blocked)

Outlook (Prognosis)

Recovery is very likely unless the dirt contains something that can cause health problems.

References

Dent AE, Kazura JW. Strongyloidiasis (Strongyloides stercoralis). In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 295.

Messacar K, Dominguez SR, Levin MJ. Infections: parasitic and mycotic. In: Hay WW Jr, Levin MJ, Sondheimer JM, Deterding RR, eds. Current Diagnosis and Treatment: Pediatrics. 22nd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2014:chap 43.

Update Date 7/12/2015

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