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Woodmont Country Club

By 1921, the Town and Country Club, founded by members of Washington's German–Jewish community, had reached a membership of 250 and started looking for more spacious quarters outside of the District. What they settled on was “an old, run-down country house, complete with a tuneless grand piano” – Winona in Bethesda. The house and land were purchased from Walter G., Beverly K., and Agnes Peter, three of the children of Armistead and Martha Peter.

Town & Country Club Dedication Day Sunday, September 24, 1992 at the country club house, Bethesda, Maryland. Courtesy Woodmont Country Club. Town & Country Club Dedication Day Programme Sunday, September 24, 1992 at the country club house, Bethesda, Maryland. Courtesy Woodmont Country Club.

Courtesy Woodmont Country Club

Extensive renovations turned the Georgian brick house into a white columned mansion and the surrounding land into a nine-hole golf course (expanded to eighteen holes by playing each hole from two sets of tees). The double row of sycamore trees near Rockville Pike still marks the entrance drive to the clubhouse. In 1930 the club officially became Woodmont Country Club, the name by which it had been informally known.

Map of the golf course at the Woodmont Country Club. Courtesy Woodmont Country Club. Woodmont Golf Course

Rita Mhley. Woodmont Country Club, a history, Rockville, MD., 1988.

Courtesy Woodmont Country Club

The club house at the Woodmont Country Club. Courtesy Woodmont Country Club Courtesy Woodmont Country Club

Colored atlas of Montgomery County focusing on Woodmont Country Club from F. H. M. Klinge's Atlas of Montgomery County. Courtesy Montgomery County Historical Society. F. H. M. Klinge. Atlas of Montgomery Country , v. 1. Lansdale, Pa., 1931.

Courtesy Montgomery County Historical Society


The Club suffered from a loss of members and income during the Depression and World War II. Then, just as it was beginning to enjoy the post-War prosperity (it had leased an additional ten acres from a fourth Peter heir, George Freeland Peter, to expand the golf course to eighteen holes and had made plans to renovate the club house), the Federal Government announced its intention to purchase the property for NIH in 1948. The Club relocated five miles north on Rockville Pike, where it still remains, while the Bethesda property and house were operated as the public Glenbrook Golf Course until 1955. Ground was broken for the National Library of Medicine in 1959.

Post-War Club Activities

Cordial Invitation to the Woodmont Country Club Formal Dinner-Dance, November 30, 1946. Courtesy Woodmont Country Club. Formal Dinner-Dance, 1946
Courtesy Woodmont Country Club

Illustrated flyer for a Saturday Night Summer Dance at Woodmont Country Club, June 21, 1947. Courtesy Woodmont Country Club. Saturday Night Summer Dance, 1947
Courtesy Woodmont Country Club

Flyer announcing the Woodmont Country Club expanded golf course, May 30, 1947. Courtesy Woodmont Country Club. Woodmont Country Club Expanded Golf Course, 1947
Courtesy Woodmont Country Club