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NLM Announces 2018 History of Medicine Lecture Series

The National Library of Medicine announces its History of Medicine Lecture Series for 2018. Complete details are available from the NLM History of Medicine Division.

Kicking off the series on Monday, January 29, at 11 am Eastern Time on the NIH campus and videocast, will be Stevens Institute of Technology's Theresa MacPhail, PhD, Assistant Professor Science and Technology Studies, who will speak on The Evolution of Viral Networks: H1N1, Ebola, and Zika.

Author of The Viral Network: A Pathography of the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic (Cornell University Press, 2014), Dr. MacPhail will address the culture of public health, the production of scientific knowledge, networks of expertise, information sharing, and everyday experiences of epidemiologists, microbiologists, biomedical scientists, and medical practitioners. Her lecture is the keynote address of Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History, which brings together scholars from various fields of medical history whose innovative research shows promise through the use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. The workshop is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) through a grant to Virginia Tech, and is a collaborative outcome of the NLM’s ongoing partnership with the NEH. Learn more about the workshop, its selected participants, and its significance through its official web site, and this news release from Virginia Tech.

Dr. MacPhail's lecture will take place in the NIH Natcher Conference Center, Building 45, Balcony B Auditorium. To insure adequate space, we ask people who plan to attend to RSVP here.

The NLM History of Medicine Lecture Series promotes awareness and use of NLM historical collections for research, education, and public service in biomedicine, the social sciences, and the humanities. The series also supports the commitment of the NLM to recognize the diversity of its collections—which span ten centuries, encompass a range of digital and physical formats, and originate from nearly every part of the globe—and to appreciate the individuals of various disciplines who value these collections and use them advance their research, teaching, and learning.

Additional events in the 2018 Lecture Series include:

  • A Conversation about Graphic Medicine, a special program in conjunction with Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well Drawn, a new NLM special display, traveling banner exhibition, and online exhibition launching soon
  • Trevor Owens, Head of Digital Content Management, Library of Congress, who will speak on Scientists' Hard Drives, Databases, and Blogs: Preservation Intent and Source Criticism in the Digital History of Science, Technology and Medicine
  • Heidi Morefield, MSc, 2017 NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellow in the History of Medicine, Doctoral student, Department of the History of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, who will offer the 2nd Annual Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine, on the subject of Transplanting Technology: Dr. Michael DeBakey and Cold War Technology Transfer
  • David S. Jones, MD, PhD, A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine, Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the Faculty of Medicine, Harvard University, who will offer the 10th Annual James H. Cassedy Memorial Lecture in the History of Medicine, on the subject of Making the Case for History in Medical Education

All NLM History of Medicine Lectures are free, open to the public, live-streamed globally, and subsequently archived, by NIH VideoCasting. This videocasting and archiving is made possible through a generous gift to the NLM from the Michael E. DeBakey Medical Foundation. The NLM is authorized to accept donations in support of its mission.

Interviews with the speakers in the History of Medicine Lecture Series are published in Circulating Now, the blog of the NLM History of Medicine Division. Explore interviews with past lecturers on the blog and stay informed about the Lecture Series on Twitter at #NLMHistTalk.

Since its founding in 1836, the National Library of Medicine has played a pivotal role in translating biomedical research into practice and is a leader in information innovation. NLM is the world's largest medical library, and millions of scientists, health professionals and the public around the world use NLM services every day.