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Most horrible and Shocking Murders banner.

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A correct likeness of Dr. Parkman [in top hat and suit, with arms folded behind, walking]. As last seen previous to the murder.  (Illustration from Trial of Professor John W. Webster, 1850.) The restoration of Dr. George Parkman's skeleton. (Illustration from Trial of Professor John W. Webster, 1850.).
EVER SINCE THE INVENTION OF moveable type in the mid-1400s, the public’s appetite for tales of shocking murders —“true crime” —has been an enduring aspect of the market for printed material. For more than five centuries, murder pamphlets have been hawked on street corners, town squares, taverns, coffeehouses, news stands, and book shops. Typically, a local printer would put together a pamphlet that claimed to be a true account of a murder, consisting of a narrative, trial transcript, and/or written confession of the murderer before his or her execution.

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'True Crime' Murder Pamphlets in the Collection of the National Library of Medicine banner.